(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Breeder and Sportsman (1905)"






III 










D 


E007 037331b fi 

California Stale Library 



> ♦ < ' 



o, 134240.... Received. MAf 1906 



VOL.. XL.VII. No. 1. 
36 GEARY STREET. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 8, 1905. 



SUBSCRIPTION 
THREE DOLLARS A TEAR 




2 



(The Qxs&bsx cmfr gpxrrteutcm 



[July 8, 1906 



CALIFORNIA STATE FAIR, 1905. 

SACRAMENTO, SEPTEMBER 2d, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th and 9th 
Guaranteed Stakes for Harness Races. Entries Close July 10, 1905. 



PROGRAM 
11- 



ME. 



Saturday, September 2d, 

1— OCCIDENT STAKES, $400 added Closed Jan. 1, 1903 

2— STALLION STAKES, Pacing Division Closed June 1, 1903 

3— 2:09 CLASS PACE $800 

4— 2:15 CLASS TROT 700 

Tuesday, September 5th. 

5— STALLION STAKES, Trotting Division Closed June 1, 1903 

6— 2:13 CLASS PACE $600 

7— 2:12 CLASS TROT 700 

Wednesday, September 6th. 

8— 2:20 CLASS PACE $600 

6—2:30 CLASS TROT 600 

10— CLAIMING RACE FOR 2:25 CLASS PACERS 500 

Winner to be sold at auction at the conclusion of the race for 1300. If sold for more 
than $300, one-half of the surplus to go to the second horse and one-half to the State 
Agricultural Society. Any horse In the race exoept the winner to be olaimed for 
$300 and the amount of second money. 



Thursday, September 7th. 

-OCCIDENT-=STANFORD PACE 



14 

15- 
10 

17 

IN 
19- 



For three year-old pacers that were originally entered in either the Stanford or 
Occident Stakes. $50 entrance and $100 added by the State Agricultural Society for 
each starter over three and up toslx. Colts must be named July l, 191 Jo, and entrance 
money due and must be paid August 15th. ao follows: $40 from those having made 
tlrst payment. $25 from those having made first and second payments, nothing from 
those having made first, second and third payments in the Occident Stake; $45 from 
those having made first payment. $40 from those having made first and second pay- 
ments. $30 from those having made first, second and third payments in the Stanford 
Stake. Only pacing colts having baen entered in the Occident and Stanford Stakes 
of 1905 are eligible to this Stake. 



-2:18 CLASS TROT 

-CLAIMING RACE FOR 2:27 CLASS TROTTERS 



$600 
500 



Winner to be sold at auction at the conclusion or the race for $300. If sold for more 
than $300, one-half of the surplus to go to second horse and one-half to the State 
Agricultural Society. Any horse in the race except the winner to be olaimed for 
$300 and the amount of second money. 

Friday, September 8th. 

-STANFORD STAKE, $300 Added Closed June 1, 1903 

-2:18 CLASS PACE $600 

-FREE-FOR-ALL TROT 800 

Saturday, September 9th. 

-2:25 CLASS PACE $1500 

-FREE-FOR-ALL PACE 800 

-2:24 CLASS TROT 1500 



N. B.— Races Nos. 3, 4V, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 13, 13, IS, 16, 17, 18 and 19 Close MONDAY, JULY 10, 1905, and all Entries by Mall must bear Postmark not later than that Date. 

SPECIAL CONDITIONS. 



Entrance five per cent. 

Five peroentof the amount of the stakes closing July 10th (except the Stanford Occident Pace) 
will be deducted from money winners. 

All races, mile heats, three In five, except otherwise stated. 

Moneys to be divided 50, 15, 15 and 10 per oent. unless otherwise speolfied in conditions. 

All races to fill satisfactory to the Board of Directors or they may be declared off. 

Distance In all heats 83 yards, but If the field is more than eight, 100 yards. A horse not win- 
ning ot making a duad liuat In three, to be ruled out, but will retain his position in 
summary, except otherwise stated 

If there are less than four starters the Society may, if they so decide, allow them to contest for 
the entrance moneys only paid in, to be divided 60 30 and 10 per cent. 

Stakes are for the amount guaranteed— no more, no less. 

When only two start they may contest for the entrance money paid in, to be divided per cent 
the first and 33M per cent to the second. 
A horse distancing the field will only be entitled to first and fourth moneys 



Hopples barred in trots, but allowed in pacing races, except where otherwise stated. 

The society reserves the right to start any heat after the fourth score, regardless of the position 

of the horses. 

The Board of Directors reserve the right to change the hour and day or any race, except when It 
becomes necessary to antedate a race in which instance the nominators will receive three days' 
notice by mail to address of entry The right reserved to declare off or postpone any or all races on 
account of weather or other sufficient cause. 

Racing colors should be claimed with entries, must be named by 5 p. h. on the day preceding the 
race and must be worn on the track in all races. Colors will be registered In the order In wbloh 
they are received, and If not named, or when colors conflict, drivers will be required to wear colors 
selected by the Secretary. 

Drivers must weigh in by 12 o'clock noon day of race they are to drive. 

The Board reserves the right to Inflict penalties for non compliance with the above conditions. 
Otherwise than as herein specified, National Trotting Association (of which this Society Is a 

member) rules to govern. 



B. F. RUSH, President. 



Address all communications to the Secretary. 

AL. LINDLEY, Secretary, SACRAMENTO, CAL, 

NOTICE TO OWNERS AND TRAINERS. 

Spbcial— Owing to the demand for stabling the Society -will only provide stall* for horses entered in races. Special stalls for horses shown for premiums. 
It Is not Intended to give any specials. If you want to start your horses or secure stalls, enter In advertised races. 



The Crowley Stake No,2 

A SIDE STAKE FOR STARTERS IN 
THE THREE YEAR-OLD DIVISIONS 

OF THE 

Pacific Breeders Futurity Stakes No. 5 

(FOALS OF 1905-TO TAKE PLACE IN 1908) 

Entries to Close Tuesday, August I, '05 

CONDITIONS. 

A Side Stake of 125 each for Trotting and Paoing Foals of 1905 that were entered or substituted 
and will start in the Three-Year-Old Divisions of the Breeders Futurity In 1908. All money paid In 
on trotting foals to be divided among those starting in the trotting division, and all money paid in 
on pacers to be divided among those that start in the paoing division. Moneys divided 75 and 35 per 
cent and to go to the first and second horses in this side stake, according to their positions in the 
fioal summary of each race. In case all those in the side stake should be distanced in the first beat 
ot either of th? regular events, they shall start In another race, beat two heats in three, on the same 
day, to decide the money winners. Entrance to the side stake $25 each. The money to be deposited 
in some reputable bank, to remain at Interest until the stake is trotted. 

Entries Close Tuesday, August 1st, with F. W. KELI.EY, Secretary P. C. T. H. B. A. 

30 Geary St , San Francisco. 







X 




















Special Light, Low 
Seat, Pneumatic 
Speed Cart, No. 1, 
Especially adapted 
for track use. 



I« the l.lclitfut 'Long-Shaft 
Track Cart In the World. 



TOOMBY 

TWO WHEELERS 

ARE THE LEADERS. 

Sulkies in Ail Sizes. 

Pneumatic 
Road and Track Carts. 

Pneumatic Pole Carts 

for Team Work on both Road 
and Track. 

High Wheel Jog Carts, 

Long Shift Breaking Carts. 

Send for latest Catalogue to 

S. TOOMEY & CO. 

Canal Dover, Ohio, V. S. A. 

O'BRIEN & SONS 

COAST AGENTS 

Golden Gate Ave. & Polk St. 
SAN FBANCISCO, CAL, 



Additional Guaranteed Stakes 
Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders Association 
Fresno Race Meeting 

JULY 19, 20, 21 and 22, 1905, 

Entries Close Monday, July 10. 

WEDNESDAY, JULY 19. 

2:13 Class Pacing, Hanford Stakes $600 

THURSDAY, JULY 20. 
Three-Year=OJd Trotting, Geo. L. Warlow Stakes $400 
FRIDAY. JULY 21. 

Three* Year=01d Pacing, Sunny Side Stakes $400 

2:12 Class Trotting, Blasingame Stakes 600 

SATURDAY, JULY 22. 
2:22 Class Trotting, Grand Central Hotel Stakes .... $600 

Conditions same as for Stakes that closed on June 15th for this meeting. 
Send all communications to the Secretary. 
E. P. HKAl.lt. F. W. KELLEY, Secretary, 

President 36 Geary Street, San Francisco 



DEXTER PRINCE STABLES 

TRAINING, BOARDING AND SALE 

Cor. of Grove and Baker Streets, just at the Panhandle Entrance to Golden Gate Park 

(Take Hayes, McAllister or Devlsadero Street Care) 

Best located and healthiest Stable In San Francisco. Always a good roadster on band for 
sale. Careful and experienced men to care for and exercise park roadsters and prepare horses for 
track use. Ladies can go and return to stable d not have their horses frightened by automobiles 
or cars. 

fiionk park lea A. J. MARTIN, Prop. 



BOARDING AND LIVERY 

1530 F'ZEHJIls 8TREJE1T 



HEST OF ACCOMMODATIONS. 
CALL AND SKE FOK YOI KSELK. 



BET. LYON AND CENTRL AVE. 

Hayes St Cars Pass the Door 



P^H i frrt*f*e. Tf\ hi 1 1 f\ t^rl and type written reafl y for Naming 

rCUlglCCa I dUUiaiCU Write for prices. BREEDER AND 
Sportsman, 36 Geary Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



134240 



July 8, 1905] 



3 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

F. W. KELLEY, PBOPRIBTOR. 

Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast, 

— OfHOB — 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O BOX 2300. 
Telephone: Black 586. 



Brmi— One Year S3, Six Months SI. 75, Three Months 81 
STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 
^Motley snould be sent by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
iddressed to F. W. Kellby, 38 Geary St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee 
of good faith. 



San Francisco, Saturday, July 8, 1905. 

A BIG SUCCESS la the Los Angeles meeting. 
Racing has been first class since the opening day, 
the time has been fast, contests good and clean, and a 
large crowd has been in attendance every day. The 
Los Angeles Harness Horse Association deserves the 
thanks of every horseman in California for its effort. 
The energetic gentlemen who organized it, showed 
their faith in the popularity of the sport by offering a 
splendid program of $1000 purses, and the horsemen 
responded by giving them a good entry list, and the 
best racing that Los Angeles has seen for years. The 
L09 Angeles Association has shown what energy and 
enthusiasm can do. There are a dozen towns in Cali- 
fornia where successful meetings could be held every 
year, if only the people most interested in harness 
horse breeding and development had a little of the 
energy and push the Los Angeles horsemen have. 
They have the tracks and everything else that is 
necessary except the enterprise. Cannot some of the 
horsemen who are at Los Angeles this week discover 
the energy germs, capture a few, bring them north 
and innoculate the harness horse people and track 
owners here? They are nearly all afflicted now with 
the sleeping sickness, and we think the Los Angeles 
germ might effect a cure if it could be introduced into 
this section. 



CNTRIES CLOSE MONDAY NEXT for the State 
Fair harness events and also for six additional 
purses for the Breeders meeting at Fresno. These 
are the only remaining meetings advertised for Cali- 
fornia this year except the Santa Rosa meeting for 
which entries are already closed, so if owners wish to 
race they must make entries at these two places. The 
new track at Sacramento is almost finished and will 
be ready to jog over within two or three weeks. A 
big force of carpenters and laborers is at work on the 
grounds and things will be in readiness for the first 
fair at the new grounds, which is already the talk of 
the State. The harness program is a most liberal one, 
providing generous purses and three races each day. 
Every owner, breeder and trainer who has any interest 
in the breeding or developingof names' horses should 
do everything in his power to aid the State Fair this 
year. Make entries if you can, and solicit your friends 
to make entries. Make the fair a success so far as 
your efforts go, and help to build up a State institu- 
tion that under intelligent management will be one 
of great good to all. Entries close Monday next, 
July 10th. 



Left Denver for Eastern Tracks. 



reasonable offer is made, it is more than probable that 
this son of Strathway will remain in the West. The 
trotter has shown great speed this season, but seems 
scarcely over his indisposition of last season. 

MissGeorgie went wrong in the only race she started 
here; Bon Voyage has not been right since he as- 
tonished horsemen by stepping a last quarter in :30, 
and Sally Lunn is now indisposed. 

The match race between Getaway and Delia Mc- 
Carthy did not come off, the owners of the mare pay- 
ing forfeit. Delia McCarthy Is a good maro and 
probably worth the money paid for her, but the Den- 
ver trainers do not think she is a 2:10 prospect by a 
good deal, 

Hallina Morgan, the three-year-old filly, stepped a 
quarter in 29 seconds in a workout the last day of the 
meeting. She is barely three years old being a June 
foal. She is owned by Joseph Barrett of Albuquerque, 
and has won nearly $2000 this year, most of her starts 
being against aged horses. Her present record is 2:21, 
made at Las Vegas, but she was a close second In 
2:133 at Denver this week. 



Last Saturday the first consignment of harness 
horses that have been racing at Denver loft for the 
East. The first carload contained the W. A. Clark 
Jr. string, including Bon Voyage, Mi9s Georgie, Mo- 
rone, Sally Lunn and Will Clark. With this string 
were shipped Oregon Maid and Getaway ol the J. A. 
Richardson string, Helen Norte and Belladi of the 
Brent stable, and Moroeco 2:12 and Mack Mack 2:12}, 
who are in charge of Driver Henry Hellman. 

These owners planned to stop off at L.berty ville, 
111., to take advantage of the six days' race meeting 
there. They will then split up. Driver Rutherford 
of the Brent string and Hellman will probably take 
their charges direct to Detroit. The Clark horses 
■ will go through to Read vllle, Mass. They will start 
at Saugus, Me., and other New England meetings, 
avoiding the Detroit and Buffalo meetings, and will 
start on the Grand Circuit at the Hartford meeting. 

The Clark string is not exactly in the best condition 
just at present. Mr. Clark has had any number of 
offers from horsemen who would like the privilege of 
using Will Clark, his green trotter for a year, but has 
received no offers that look good to him. If some 



Fast Mile by Tom Axworthy. 

The other day at Cleveland, Tom Axworthy, the 
gelding that took a four-year-old trotting record of 
2:08} last year in October, was down on the matinee 
program for an effort to beat 2:13} to wagon. Id the 
absence of his owner, F. G. Jones of Memphis, H. K. 
Devereux drove him. Of course everybody looked 
for a winning mile, but no one anticipated the ex- 
treme speed he displayed. Tom Axworthy is a giant, 
and built on the lines of a greyhound. He hasn't the 
slashing, determined gait of most great horses— a gait 
that is Impressive of extreme speed— but he glides so 
smoothly, so tigerishly stealthy, and so seemingly 
without barely touching the ground , that he deceives 
one as to his speed. He did not look to be going fast, 
but when he finished the mile the watches showed 
2:09, with the last half in 1:03J, and the last quarter 
in 31 J seconds. When Mr. Devereux finished the per- 
formance he said : "My, but that is a fast horse. He 
did not look to be going fast, and the fact is that he 
was only jogging apparently through the stretch. I 
never urged him. " With the exception of Lou Dillon 
no trotter ever negotiated a mile in time as fast at 
this season of the year. What Tom Axworthy will 
do later on no one will venture a prediction. Mr. 
Jones will start him frequently at the matinees, aDd 
when the inter-city meeting takes place Tom Axwor- 
thy will be a starter for the gold cup. 



Racing at Concord, July 4th. 

Three good races were pulled off over the new track 
at CoDcord on Independence day with an attendance 
of 600 interested spectators. The weather was hot 
the mercury climbing to 100 degrees. E. J. Randall 
officiated as presiding judge and starter, while Messrs. 
Williams and Mitchell held the watches. The results: 

First race, 3 In 5, purse $100. 

Edna De Beck by Hamb. Wilkes (Palmer) 3 2 111 

Pilot by Abbotsford, Jr (Flemmlng) 112 4 2 

Goldle by Orator (Clark) 2 3 3 2 3 

Fly Away by Comet Wilkes . ... r (Durham) 4 4 4 3 4 

Time— 2:22 , 2:23, 2:24'/j, 2:25, 2:27. 

Second race, 2 in 3, purse $75. 

Diabless by Diablo (Day) 2 l l 

Jakle F. by Sldmoor (Palmer) 1 2 2 

Dick McGinty by Sldmoor (Perry) 3 3 3 

Time— 2:28, 2:24^, 2:31.. 

Third race, 3 in 5, purse $35. 

All Welcome by Welcome (Perry) 12 2 11 

Dewey by Strathmore (Palmer) 2 113 2 

Rae C. by Rey Direct (Clark) 3 3 3 2 3 

Keno Wilkes by Comet Wilkes (Holliday) 4 l w 

Time-2:34</j, 2:35, 2:36, 2:37tf, 2:35.S 



Officers Chosen. 



Frank Herdic Still in the Game. 



Los Angeles, July 5.— At a meeting of the stock- 
holders of the Los Angeles Jockey club to-day the 
following diredtors wore chosen: Epes Randolph, J 
J Fay, J M Hale, W R Dunn, George Rose, Thomas 
Fitzgerald and J W Brooke. The officers chosen for 
the ensuing year are as follows: Fpes Randolph, 
president; J J Fay, vice-president; J W. Brooks, 
manager. It was decided to open the winter race 
meeting on Thanksgiving Day. J W Brooks, who 
leaves for the Fast August 1, states that the outlook 
for the coming season is the most promising of any 
yet held by the Ascot organization, 

S. Christianson of ibis city has returned from his 
trip to Denver, where he spent a week attondingthe 
Overland Park meeting. He says ho saw some fine 
racing, but the high altitudo makes horses Inconsist- 
ent, as they will go a fast race one day and be all out 
In slower time at their next start. Mr. Christianson 
speaks in the highest terms of the Gentlemen's Driv- 
ing Club, of which he was a guest while there. It has 
240 members, fine club rooms, and 1b very prosperous. 
Its matinee racing is held on a track in the park, and 
no races are trotted or paced for money. Mr. C. 
brought back samples of this club's year books, sta- 
tionery, etc., to show the members of the new driving 
club which is being organized here in San Francisco 



[Amerloan Sportsman.] 
No man is better known to the horsemen of the 
country than the pool seller, Frank Herdic, Mr. 
Herdic was quite ill this winter, and not long ago a 
Pennsylvania horseman brought the news to this office 
that he had suffered a relapse and would hardly re- 
cover. The following letter from Mr. Herdic explains 
itself: 

Williamsport, PA., June 22, 1905. 
American Sportsman:— As I see In your paper I had 
had a relapse and was very low, I drop you this line 
to let you see I am very much alive and will start in 
next month at Pittsburg and go along with the boys. 
Have had quite a race and am lucky to get a heat, but 
second money will do where you don't want a record. 
Looks as though we might have some races at that, 
and Cleveland's coming back in the ranks again looks 
like old time sport. I expect to see good racing where 
they trot horses and pace them, and not try to make 
running horses out of the trotter and pacer. The more 
they fuss with the old stylo of racing, the more they 
OJt off the revenue, and the tracks need all the com- 
missions they can get to pay out, and I know it. But 
there are those who have an idea and are always ad- 
vancing opinions when it don't cost them a cent— agri- 
tators and kickers, say iDg people want short races and 
quick action for their money. I never saw any time 
in my life where a man could win $25 or $50 or more 
that he was not willing to stay until dark. They tried 
the dash system at Empire City and Brighton Beach 
last year, and we worked as hard as two men could — 
that's Undo Bill Riley aDd self— and could simply not 
do 25 per cent of what we should have done. The 
public will not put their money on dashes, for if they 
get in wrong they have no chance to get out, and 
what they can do to books is good and plenty. It 
opens a hole, and there you are. I could say a whole 
lot, but guess I will let them use their own judgment. 

Truly yours, Frank L. Herdic. 

Gaiting a Saddle Horse. 

An expert in gaiting horses gives the following 
hints: 

Always select the gait you wish to go and make the 
horse take it; don't allow the horse to decide. Always 
go into the other gaits from the flat foot walk. Never 
let your horse rush away when first mounted, but in- 
stead start in a walk. Do not keep him constantly at 
one gait, but change quite often, otherwise he will 
soon become adapted to the one gait in which you 
ride, and practically lose the other gaits. 

For a trot slacken the reins a trifle, and steadily 
take hold of the mane or touch the neck with the 
right hand, and at the same timo rise slightly In the 
saddle, urging on the horse gently. If he makes a 
mistake, and mixes, pull him back co a walk at once, 
and repeat the maneuver. For the canter, slacken 
the reins, incline your body forward, raise your right 
hand as if to salute, and cluck to the horse. When 
he starts, take sufficient hold of the reins to pull in 
his nose and make him arch his neck. 

Many highly trained horses will go into a canter at 
the mere inclination of the body. For a rack, or 
single foot, tighten the reins and give the bit a num- 
ber of almost impreceptlble jerks, at the same time 
urge him on with voice or whip, as he requires. If 
you fed him falter, or as if he was going to change 
into another gait, slightly shake the bit and urge him 
on. It is well to remember that this last gait is the 
hardest of all on the horse; for this reason he should 
not ordinarily be asked to go at this gait for more 
than a mile without change. 

New Track at Los Alamos. 



Messrs. J. Doherty and E. P. Holloway are just 
oompleting the grading of a new five furlong track 
at Los Alamos, Santa Barbara county. It is located 
just a half mile southeast of the town and is pro- 
nounced by all the horsemen who have seen it an ex- 
osllent track. The proprietors proposo to get up 
some colt stakes to be trotted and paced in the fu- 
turo, and will give meetings with such purses as they 
can afford. There is much interest in horse breeding 1 
and training in that locality, and the uow track will be 
popular with tho public. 

Horses Growing More Valuable. 

Horses are growlog more valuable overy day. The world's sup- 
ply is loss than In any year for a decade. The theory that auto- 
mobiles, street cars, traction engines etc , would In time super- 
sede the horso has not been verlHed. Good horses are higher 
to day than ever. This should put breed*™ and horse owners In 
general on their guard to protect their brood mares und colts 
against all forms of contagious and debilitating diseases, such as 
distemper, Influenza, pinkeye, shipping fever, etc. Preventive 
measures should bo adopted in all cases. Craft's Liquid Distem- 
por Cure will cure every case started and will prevent othors.no 
matter how exposed, from attack. It acts on the. blood and 
glands and expels the germs that cause the disease. It Is simple 
and easy to give; absolutely harmless to anything but thegerms 
of disease. It Is sold by all druggists and turf goods houses, or. 
the manufacturers, Wells MedlclnoCo., 13 Third street, Lafayette 
Indiana. 



4 



erne gvceoev cmfc ^portfiman 



[July 8, 1905 



Good Prospects for Fresno Meeting. 

The horsemen of Fresno and vicinity are doing a 
lot of hustling for the meeting there July 19-22 and 
from the present outlook it will be one of the best 
weeks of racing on the Coast this year. The follow- 
ing from the Fresno RepvbUran tells the story of what 
is going on at the liaisin City track: 

A great deal of interest is being taken in the Fresno 
meeting to be held July 19-22 and prospects are first 
class for a week of goo i sport. A week will intervene 
between the Los Angeles meeting and tbe Fresno race 
goers will have a chance to see the campaigners in 
their work, as most of them will be shipped here 
arbout next Sunday. 

Any lover of harness horses can spend several in- 
teresting hours any morning at the Fresno Fair 
Grounds track watching the different trainers getting 
their trotters and pacers rrady for the races. The 
Fresno track has long had the reputation of being 
one of the fastest track? in the country, and although 
interest in the looal horse business has not been as 
lively in the pa6t few years as it might have been, the 
track is as good as it ever was and Fresno may yet 
regain tbe name of being one of the best race horse 
centers on the Coast. 

There are now about fifty head of horses in 
training here and of these the best work this 
season has been shown by the dun mare The- 
donna by Athadon 2:27, owned by J. M. McKay, of 
Fresno, and in the string of Schuyler Walton. This 
mare was purchased as a two-year-old for less than 
8100 from Colonel Hay, and has been trained but very 
little until this year, yet she has shown such a re- 
markable turn of speed that Monroe Salisbury offered 
$5000 for her. Thedonna has never started in a race, 
but recently paced a mile in 2:103, w ' tn tne ' ast half 
in 1:02J, and good judges say she will surely go in 2:04. 

Another one in Mr. Walton's stable that will race 
here is Geo. L. Warlow's great three-year-old stallion 
Athasham that earned a two-year-old trotting record 
last season of 2:20. He is a good looking, nice-made 
colt by Athadon 2:27, dam Flora Wicker9ham by 
Jun'.o, and if nothing goes wrong with him, should 
develop into one of the best three-year-olds of the 
year. Last week Athasham trotted a work-out mile 
in 2:1 B pretty handily and it looks as if a mile in 2:15 
would be easy for him. 

Others in Mr. Walton's stable that look promising 
are Mr. Warlow's two-year-old colt Stanford Mc- 
Kinney by McKinney, dam Avena by Palo Alto 2:083. 
Clara, a three-year-old St. Clair colt, owned by Louis 
Bacbant of Fresno that has raced a mile in 2:22}, with 
a half in 1:083; Mabel C. 2:20} by Strathway, owned 
by Joe Corey of Hanford; the pacing mare Babe, 
owned by Harry Bernstein of Hanford and Teddy J. 
and Bobby J. both owned by R. B. Parker, which 
have shown ability to step in 2:25. 

One of the nicest gaited trotting mares at the track 
is a bay daughter of Athadon, ow ned by a local en- 
thusiast and in the stable of Charley Clark. This 
mare has had but very little training and has not 
beaten 2:20 in her work, but is a very promising mare 
and will be heard from later. Mr. Clark has quite a 
number of good green trotters in his charge, but will 
not have anythnig to race until next season. 

The best race prospect in the string of Charley 
Middleton is the seven-year-old bay mare by Junio, 
out of Susie Hall by El Capitan. She has been 
trained but little and has never been a9ked to step a 
fast mile, but has shown a remarkable turn of speed 
for a trotter and is a most promising prospect. Mr 
Middleton is also training Louis Bachant's pacer 
George 2:18}, that, will start in the Fresno Driving 
Club race, and a lot of green prospects, mostly two 
and three-year-olds. Among tbe latter Is a handsome 
three-year-old by Athablo, dam Daybreak, owned by 
L. Stock of Fresno. 

Joe Depoister is training a number of good green 
ones, among the best of which are the three year-old 
colt Guy by Guy McKinney, dam by Dexter Prince 
and Milton Gear, a pacer by Harry Gear, dam Lulu 
N. by Dawn. 

Denver Meeting. 

Two harness events with good fields were on the 
racing program at Overland Park Friday afternoon. 
Martha R., owned by J. Fr, I llobert9, and driven by 
Harry Bush, won the 2:1 1 pa , i ' lit heats. The 

fastest time was 2:09}, made in the first heat. 

Dewey, the wfnner of the Yellowstone trotting 
stake, took the 2:30 trot in straight, heats, the fastest 
time being 2: 15 J, in the second heat. 

In the first heal of the pace tbe field got away to 
the eighth in :15}. The quarter was reached in :31}. 
When the half was passed in 1:03} the enthusiasm in 
the stands grew marked. Martha B. gave evidence 
of her speed qualities, and the three-quarters was 
reached in 1:36 flat. They raced home, covering the 
mile in 2:09}. 



The second heat was materially slower. The six- 
teenth was passed in :16, the quarter in .33, the half 
In 1:06, and the three-quarters in 1:40. The time for 
the mile was 2:12}. Thesummares: 

Pacing, 2:11 class purse*500. 



Martha B, bm by Ashland Wilkes (Bush) 1 1 

JessC . s g by Catata (Frank) 4 2 

Yr ung Hal. b h by Hal Dillard (Frost) 2 5 

Kiowa, b k by Garnet Wilkes (Gonzales) 3 4 

Amble W , b m, by Alta Boy (Cassidy) 5 3 

Tlme-2:09K 2:12V4. 
Trotting, 2:30 class, purse S500. 

Dewey, s g by Superior (Smith- Loomis) 1 1 

Woody R., b g by Woody C (Johnson) 2 2 

J. J. M , Jr., br h by Robin (MoGuire) 4 3 

Iosa, b m by Phlllonldes (Steller) 3 4 



TIme-2:16X,2:15«.| 

But one harness race was on the program for Satur- 
day, the 2:20 class pace, and this proved a very tame 
affair as there were but two startere, Geo. Easter- 
brook's mare Florodora greatly outclassing her 
opponent, the bay horse Foxy Quiller, own brother to 
the champion trotting stallion Cresceus, although 
Foxy Quiller might have made her go faster had he 
tried. Loomis evidently thought that Ed Geers' re- 
mark was a wise one when he said that many a good 
horse is ruined trying to beat one that is known to be 
much faster, and he acted accordingly. The sum- 
mary : 

Pacing, 2:20 class, 1 1000. 

Florodora, b m by Dadrien (Maguire) 111 

Foxy Quiller, b m by Robert McGregor (Loomis) 2 2 2 

Time-2:14H. 2:21*, 2:162£. 

On Monday, Golden Gite, "Smokestack" Brown's 
Bay Bird pacer, took a record of 2:13} in the first heat 
of the 2:30 pace, and was second in the remaining 
heats, thereby getting second money. Harold D., 
the favorite, won the second heat In 2:12}, but was 
distanced in the next heat, and the race went to Lady 
M. Summary: 



Pacing, S:?0 class, purse (500. 

Lady M., b m by Pomona (Cummlngs) 4 3 11 

Golden Gate, b g by Bay Bird (Brown) 12 2 2 

Harold D , ch g by Dexter Prince (Dunlap) 8 1 dis 

Halina Morgan, b m by Duplex Hal (Frost) 2 3 dis 

Pueblo Girl, blk m by Harris (Loomis) 5 4 dis 



Time— 2:13*, 2:12*. 2:13*, 2:154. 

A holiday crowd packed the grand stand July 4th, 
the last day of the harness racing, so far as the 
regular program is concerned. The results of the two 
harness events are as follows: 

Pacing, 2:13 olass, purse {1000. 

Florodora. b m by Dadrien (McGuire) 3 3 111 

Rey Del Diablo, ch g by Diablo (Chaboya) 112 4 2 

Jess C. and Dr. Almont also started. 

Time— 2:12X. 2:145£, 2:l4tf, 2:16^, 2:17. 

Trotting, 2:35 class, purse $500. 

Redemption, ch g by Superior (Hooper) 1 1 

Rosalind, b m by Stam B (Newman) 2 2 

The Jester, Nettie Vangrundy and King Bezant also started. 
Tlme-2:173tf. 2:22. 



San Francisco Driving Club. 



The races of the San Francisco Driving Club at 
Ingleeide track drew a crowd of about 2000 people on 
July 4th. Four harness and two runningevents made 
up the card. Two books handled tbe coin and did a 
thriving trade. The purses raced for amounted to 
about $150 in each case. For each harness e*ent the 
books hung up $100 to which was added the entrance 
fee of $10 for each horse. The results were as follows: 



First race. 

Lady Diana l l 

Little Jim 2 3 

General Hughes 3 2 

Girlie, Nora Hagerty, White Cloud and Peggie also started. 
Best time 2:34J<. 

Second raoe. 

Vic Schiller 6 5 11 

KlngV 2 12 2 

Kitty D 14 4 3 

Lady Jeffries, Welladay and Harry Hurst also started. Best 
time 2:20 In Urst heat. 

Third race. 

Bill Ellsworth » l l 

Dynamite l 5 2 

Grace McKinney 4 3 2 

Toughy A., Tehama Boy and Mixer also started. Best time 2:25^ 

Sixth race. 

Dan Alden g l i 

Fred Chase l 3 7 

Senator Hearst 3 2 2 



Don L , Mofflt D., Ed Rea, and Billy K. also started. Best 

Mme2:38!4- 

State Fair Notes. 

The last outstanding liability, consisting of purees 
due horsemen and other minor obligations, will be 
paid within the next fortnight. The total indebted- 
ness amounts to less than $25,000, and the appropria- 
tion which became available July 1st, is more than 
sufficient to settle what is due. 

Over one hundred men and seventy-five teams are 
now engaged in grading for the new track and in 
laying foundations for the buildings. 

The grading on the track was finished last evening 
and the track is now ready for the top coat. 

Architect M. A. Allen, who has superintended con 
struction of Harlem, Hawthorne, Emeryville, TanI 
foran and Ascot Parks, says that conditions are most 
favorable for securing a fast track at the new park. 
The soil, he says, is of springy character, a mixture 
of clay and loam that is always a guarantee of speed 
upon a well-constructed track. 



The cross-grades on the turns are so constructed 
that a horse rounding them at a two-minute gait 
maintains his exact equilibrium. 

The premium list for the livestock and poultry 
exhibits will go to the printer in a few daj s. It will 
offer about $20,000 in prizes. 

It has been decided to give three running races each 
day, the smallest purse to be $200 and the average to 
be considerably more. 

For the Stanford, Occident and Stallion Stakes, in 
the harness events, the payments have been as numer- 
ous as during any past year, and the directors have 
advertised liberal money in all harness races, intending 
to give this department special encouragement. 
Entries will close July 10th. 

At the meeting of the directors to be held on July 
8th bids will be opened and contracts let for the 
construction of buildings for sheep, swine and exhibi- 
tion horses. It is expected that this work will cost 
about $20,000.— Sac. Union. 



Charley Herr 2:07. 

Charley Herr was as true, as honest, as game, as 
reliable and as mismanaged a trotter as ever lived. 
No horse of recent years has ever occupied the same 
place in public esteem as this remarkable stallion, and 
had fortune been kind enough to have taken from his 
path the many obstacles that where strewn in his 
way it is more than probable that his list of victories 
would have been doubled. Charley Herr was one of 
the very few absolutely reliable trotters this country 
has ever seen; he never trotted a bad race when he 
was fit; he never left his feet except when an accident 
befell him; he tried every inch of the journey, and 
was probably driven for more heats than any trotter 
that ever lived whose campaign was no longer than 
his. His very honesty commanded the respect and 
admiration of every lover of gameness in an animal, 
and the honest little Irishman who owns him and who 
should have reaped a rich reward through theowner- 
ship of so remarkable a horse, was himself in this 
respect an example for all horsemen. Nearly all of 
Charley Herr's races where hard battles, and in each 
he sovered himself with glory, for in victory or defeat 
he struggled gamely for supremacy, and could always 
be depended upon to stick to a trot. He has probably 
been driven from "eend to eend" more frequently 
than any other horse in turf history, and has gamely 
stood enough gruelling and severe punishment to 
have put an end to any other horse. Possibly the 
most sensational race in his career was the one in 
which he was overcome by Cresceus at Read ville, and 
in this game struggle he lost only by the narrowest of 
margins. It will be remembered that in the fir6t two 
heats he was returned a winner and lost tbe third by 
an eyelash, so close in fact was the finish that none 
but the judges could tell which of the two stallions 
had the best of it at the wlie.— Hawley in Ky. Stock 
Farm. 



The Cart Horse Parade in London. 

The London Cart Horse Parade recently held in th • 
British metropolis is reported to have been one grand 
success from end to end. Never, according to the ad- 
vices we have received, have tbe exhibits been of euch 
high class nor yet in such superlative condition. It 
was well shown that the man w'ho first conceived the 
idea of the parade builded better than he knew. Tbe 
last was the twentieth parade that has been held and 
about 1000 horses and nearly as many drivers were in 
line. Only two of the men who founded the parade 
were present on this last occasion and these were Sir 
Walter Gilbey and Mr. Burdett Coutts, both of whom 
have labored early and late, In season and out, for the 
improvement of the British horse and the ameliora- 
tion of his condition. It is said that they had a ncost 
handsome reward. Support has for years been lent 
to the parade by both the Shire and Suffolk pedigree 
record associations, the Scottish Clydesdale society 
not yet having taken the same step directly. En- 
thusiastic indeed are some of the accounts so far 
received concerning the very marked improvement in 
the feet and ljgs of the draft horses now to be seen on 
the London streets compared to what they were 
twenty years ago. Not only that but year after year 
the same old faces are to be seen behind the same 
horses, proving that the encouragement of the Lon- 
don Cart Horse Parade is redounding not alone to 
the amelioration of the horses but to the benefit of 
their owners as well. Tbe entry this year consisted 
of 75 single-horse two-wheeled vehicles, 714 single* 
horse four-wheeled vehicles, 72 pairs and 36 unicorns. 



Caustic Balsam Does More Than We Claim. 

VALADOSTA, Tex . Deo. 4, 1004 
The Lawrence-Williams Co., Cleveland, O. 

I am a local veterinary. Treat all kinds of domestic animals 
for various diseases, and I have learned by expedience and prac- 
tice that Gombault's Caustic Balsam Is the best medlelne for 
what it is recommended I ever used. It will do more than you 
claim it will. J.A.Davis. 



July 8, 1905] 




Notes and News. 




If the owner of the pacing horse Bob, formerly 
owned by Robert Burress and driven by William 
Brown desires to sell the horse, he can probably Bed 
a buyer if he will address Holmes & Scott, Fair 
Grounds, Oregon, stating price and present condition, 
and whether he has had any brack work this season. 



Hully Gee! But they're stepping at Los Angeles. 



Six new 2:10 performers on the opening day of the 
meeting. 

And Zolook. son of McKinney reduces his record 
from 2:09} to 2:06. 

The word success is being written all over the ac- 
count of the first meeting held by the Los Angeles 
Harness Horse Association. 



Grace Kaiser, dam of Coney 2:02, etc , will be bred 
to Ben Liebes 2:174, the big son of McKinney owned 
by H. L. Frank. 

John R Conway 2:13, winner of the 2:17 pace at Los 
Angeles, is another new member of Diablo's rapidly 
growing and extensive list of 2:15 pacers. 



Ed Malloy haslet Lou Dillon step a mile in 2:15 since 
reaching Cleveland, and Mr. Billings expects to begin 
giving her some faster miles from now on. 



State Fair entries close on Monday next, July 10th. 
As the fast records made at Los Angeles will be a bar 
at Sacramento, there should be a big entry list. 



Don't forget that six additional purses for the 
Breeders meeting at Fresno will close Monday next. 
Look over the advertisement in our business columns. 



Nutwood Wilkes gets a new 2:10 performer in Tidal 
Wave 2:09. There are two or three more of his get 
that should get into the extreme speed list this year. 



Bob Mason is now the sire of three 2:10 performers, 
the mare Virginia winner of the second heat of the 
2:27 class pace at Los Angeles last Monday being by 
that horse. 

W. L. Cadman, of Walla Walla, Wash., has pur- 
chased from E. E. Gray, Hinsdale, 111., the pacer 
Edgar Boy 2:08}, by Edgar Wilkes, dam Clara, by 
Gambodo. Price $2500. 



It is said that no meeting will be given at Wood- 
land. This is too bad as Woodland has one of the fin- 
est tracke in the State and large crowds always attend 
the meetings held there. 



With Dr. W. 2:08$, Vision 2:09} and Tidal Wave 
2:09 out of the 2:13 class pace, the 8600 purse for that 
class to close Monday next for the Breeders Fresno 
meeting should get a big list of entries. 



One of the secrets of a successful trainer is a suf- 
ficient knowledge of the art of farriery to enable him 
to have the blacksmith properly shoe and balance his 
horses. Faulty action may often be remedied by 
proper shoeing. 



Mr. E. C. Peart, of Colusa, who is advertising an 
auction sale of horses In the Breeder and Sports- 
man writes: "Your paper is doing me good. This 
mail brings me letters from Fresno, Merced, Sacra- 
mento and Oakland." 

The McKinneys are starting out this year winning 
races and reducing records. There is no family that 
trains on any better than the one established by the 
greatest son of Alcyone. They get the money and the 
records, and improve with age. 



Is this "tainted money?" The owner of Florence 
Nightingale 2:15} regularly donates a part of the win- 
nings of the mare to the Presbyterian Home Mission. 
On this account the mare is known throughout Ohio 
as the "Home Missionary mare." 



William Cecil reached Cleveland safely with the Mc- 
Kinney mare Lady Mowrv 2:28 and a three-year-old 
sister to her that he is training. Lady Mowry worked 
a half in 1:05$ at San Jose before she was shipped 
East and Is a likely 2:10 performer. 



Helen Keyes, the daughter of Sidney Dillon, will 
not start in the M. & M. according to an Eastern re- 
port. She may noi be raced at all this year, Mr. De 
Ryder considering her too valuable a mare to take any 
chances with until she is just ready. 



On the first day of the Los Angeles meeting, Walter 
Maben drove the mare Mamie Elizabeth by Red 
Regent, dam by Chimes, a mile against time to give 
her a record. She trotted the mile in 2:21 J. The 
next day she was started in the 2:17 class trot and got 
second money. She was second to The Commonwealth 
in the first heat of this race in 2:15}. 



It is announced in the press dispatches from the 
West that Japan intends to send several representa- 
tives to study closely the horses shown at the Lewis 
and Clark Exposition in Portland this fall. It is also 
stated that China will be officially represented in this 
regard. Much hope is held out that the Island Em- 
pire may make large purchases of breeding animals. 



Nora McKinney 2: 1 2 J, regarded by many horsemen 
as the finest road mare ever seen in New York, is said 
to have gone lame in her work a few days ago. She 
trotted faster than 2:10 in a race at the Empire track 
last season and won many brushes on the Speedway. 
William Simpson, who owns her, had counted on a 
record of 2:06 for the daughter of McKinney this 
season. 



On the opening day of the Den ver meeting in the 
third heat of the 2:30 pace, the pacing mare, Lady 
M., driven by Walter Cummings was distanced. 
This caused Cummings to lose his temper, aDd when 
Henry Dunlap accidentally got in his way as the horses 
were all being pulled up, Cummings struck him 
across the face with his whip. The judges fined 
Cummings $50. 

Mr. L. M. Ladd, of Hollister, has shipped his Palo 
Alto bred four-year old stallion Monbello to S. E. 
Kent at Los Angeles for training. Monbello is by 
Monbells, son of Electioneer and Beautiful Bells, and 
is out of the great broodmare LauraC. by Electioneer, 
second dam the thoroughbred mare Fannie Lewi9 by 
imported Buckden. Monbello shows a great turn of 
speed, and is a most promising trotter. 



Fred H. Chase & Co. will hold a sale of fifty head of 
road and carriage horses at 1732 Market street on 
Monday, July 24th. The larger part of this consign- 
ment is from the Occidental Land and Improvement 
Company (Sharon Estate), Fresno, and contains many 
handsome horses by Jim Monroe, Teheran and other 
good sires. The others are consigned by Mr. C. E. 
Needham, of Bellota, and are a very fine lot. 



Barondale 2:11}, the Iowa stallion that stood at San 
Jose in 1903 and 1904, had seven new performers last 
year, and the way his get are stepping this year over 
the Iowa tracks, makes it look as if as many more new 
ones would be added to his list this year. Many Cali- 
fornia breeders that own yearlings and sucklings by 
Mr. James' horse, hope he will bring him back here, 
as they would like to have more of the same kind. 



At the iec6nt New York Driving Club matinee the 
team race between L. A. Burke's West Wilkes and El 
Moro and W. M. C. Floyd-Jones' King Chimes and 
Gov. Holt, was the best race of its kind ever seen on 
the Yonkers track. El Moro has a record of 2:13$. 
He is by Longworth and was bred by the late A. C. 
Deitz, at Ventura, Cal. El Moro was owned for a 
time by Mr. Graham Babcock, who used him as a 
pole horse with Toggles 2:08$. 



The 2:09 class pace at Santa Rosa should prove a 
hot one. The entries are Zolock, Kelly Briggs, Alone, 
Daedalion, Queen B., El Diablo, Tom Carneal, Rajah, 
Billy Red, Miss Idaho and Reta H. On his Los 
Angeles showing Zolock should win, but if he is not 
on edge there are three or four horses entered that 
can contest the heats with him from end to end. It 
is good betting that the track record of 2:06 made 
there by Clipper in 19o0, will be broken. 



The two fastest beats ever paced in California are 
to the record of "the little red horse," John R. 
Gentry. In 1899, Gentry, Joe Patchen and Anaconda 
were engaged to give two special performances at the 
Los Angeles meeting. One was on the opening day of 
the meeting, October 21st, the other on the closing 
day, October 28th. John R. Gentry won both events 
in straight heats, and record time for a California 
track. The heats on the opening day were in 2:05 and 
2:04, and on the second day 2:04J and 2:03}. 



Golden Gate, William Brown's pacer by Bay Bird, 
won the first heat and a record of 2:13} at Denver 
on Monday. This gelding has been a very consistent 
performer at the Denver meeting and has been a good 
money winner although he has not won a race. 



The Helm Stake, which is a free-for-all pace, will be 
one of the exciting races at Fresno. Zolock 2:06, Ed- 
win S. 52:08, Tern Carneal 2:08$, Kelly Briggs 2:00} and 
Daedalion 2:10 are the entries and the probability is 
that every one will start. Look out for a split-heat 
race with a mile in 2:05, and all below 2:10. 



Dr. De Foe, of San Jose, has two colts that are as 
well bred as the best bred ones we hear so much 
about. One is a three-year old by Mendocino 2:19$, 
dam Rose McKinney the dam of Almaden 2:22}. The 
other Is a yearling by Nutwood Wilkes 2:16$, dam 
Carrie Malone, own sister to Charles Derby 2:20. 
Those two colts would do to head a stock farm, breed- 
ing mares by one to the other. 



The program of the Spokane Inter-State Fair has 
been issued. It provides for six days racing, the nice 
sum of $11,000 being offered. The 2:14 pace and 2:16 
trot, and the Spokane Derby and the Inter-State 
Relay race are $1000 each. There are several $500 
purses for harness horses, and purses range from $150 
to $500 for the over night running events. The fair 
will beheld during the week beginning October 9th. 
Entries close August 15th. Robt. H. Cosgrove is 
Secretary and Manager. 



The racing at Los Angeles 1b as good as they have 
anywhere and It is on the old three in five system, 
with auction pools and mutuels as the only means of 
betting and big crowds are in attendance every day. 
Some of the turf writers who are always crying for 
new methods probably imagine that the meeting could 
be Improved if there were a dozen or so bookmakers 
doing business and the races were on the two in three 
or the dash system, but the people who breed, train 
and own trottere and pacers don't think so. 



There is more profit or at least less loss to men wh 
breed horses to sell a five-year-old for $225 than to 
keep the same horse until he is ten years old and sell 
him for $700. It is poor economy to hold for high 
prices until they eat their heads off several times. 



On the opening day of the Lima, Ohio, meeting, 
June 27th, the Diablo gelding Pacific King by Diablo, 
trained by \ance Nuckols, won the 2:30 pace after 
dropping two heats In the fourth heat Pacific Kim* 
stepped the mile in 2:15} and could havo gone faster! 
The same day Bogan by Bow Bells won the 2:35 trot 
getting a record of 2:19} and Jack Wilkes by Guy 
Wilkes won the 2:18 trot, reducing his record to 2:20$. 



The Tom Hal family of pacers has flourished in the 
Blue Grass region of Kentucky since 1859, when the 
founder of the family was foaled. The offshoots of 
this family have found their way into many States of 
the Union, and the cross of the family occurs in a 
great many trotting and pacing pedigrees. It is said 
that the original was a roan horse called a Canadian 
pacer, and that he was taken to Lexington from 
Philadelphia. He died the property of Benjamin N. 
Shropshire, Harrison, Ky. He was supposed to be 
the grandsire of Tom Hal. 



Mr. A. B. Rodman, of Woodland, has received many 
congratulations over the winning of the 2:45 trot at 
San Jose by his big gelding Patrose, whose record of 
2:12$ made in third heat makes him the first new 2:15 
trotter for the year on this Coast. Mr. Rodman not 
only bred Patty Washington, theldam of Patrose, but 
he also bred his grandam Patty P. by Richmont. 
Patrose started four times last year, but failed to win 
a heat, but was not in condition at any time. This 
year he is all right, and never lifted his nose once 
during the race which he won at Los Angeles. He 
should trot in 2:10 before the season is over. 



Australia is fast becoming a market for the Ameri- 
can trotter. Charles W. Wright of Owensboro, Ky., 
left New York on June 13 on the British steamer Breiz 
Huel with four high bred ones for a trip of 16,000 
miles of ocean travel for Melbourne, Australia. The 
four animals are Couniess Todd three-year-old filly by 
Todd 2:14}, Blondie Grattan four-year-old filly by 
Grattan 2:13, Edna Patch five-year-old mare by Dan 
Patch 1:56, and Beatrice Master six-year-old mare by 
Quartermaster 2:21}. Mr. Wright is a competent 
tutor, as he has driven to record the following: Baby 
Ruth 2:06}. Parker S. 2:06$, Will Kerr 2:07$, Lord 
Clinton 2:08| and Henry F. 2:09$. He will instruct the 
far Southerners how to train and race the American 
trotter. 



That story sent out from Tulare a few weeks ago 
about Geo. W Kirkham of that city selling a glats 
eyed pacer for $13 000 to Geo. A " Pounder of Los 
Angeles, was a pretty hot one, and while it was at 
least $10,000 to bigs the pacer is a wonder and dem- 
onstrated it last Wednesday at Los Angeles when he 
won the two year-old event in straight heats, pacing 
the first mile in 2:15$, doubtless the fastest mile ever 
paced by a two-year-old in July. Rockaway is the 
name under which he started in his first race, but be 
was called Little Jim by his breeder, and is best known 
by that name in Tulare county. He has two "glass" 
eyes, a bald face and three white legs and is not much 
for beauty. He is a pony in size, but when he starts 
pacing has two minute speed. It is believed that with 
special preparation he could pace a half in oue minute 
before he gets out of his two-year-old form. He was 
entered in both the two-year-old and three-year-old 
pacing events at Los Angeles. 



J. M. Johnson of Calais, Me., has bought Ponkapoag 
the breeding farm of the late J. M. Forbes. There are 
one hundred and sixty acres in the farm and the price 
was $60,000. There are five dwelling houses including 
a fine mansion house, stabling of the best construction 
for one hundred and fifty horses, and a three-quarter 
mile track It lays at the foot of Blue Hill on Its 
western side and is about two miles from the Readville 
track. Mr. Johnson owns a largefarm within thecity 
limits of Calais, Me., which is provided with well built 
large barns and a half mile track. He aho ownes a 
farm in Andover, Mass., situated near the famous 
Hood farm. He owned the great race and broodmare 
Nancy Hanks, the stallion Lord Roberts, by Arion 
2:07 J, dam Nancy Hanks, and is reputed to have an 
interest in Todd now standing in Kentucky. He has a 
stable of fifteen horsesin training at Read ville, another 
at Calais, Me., in charge of Jesse Humphreville, and 
quite a lot of horses on his Andover farm. The cata- 
logue which he issued last spring of his Calais farm 
stock contained the names of fifty fine horBep, all 
highly bred. 



Senator Stanford used to think that when he got a 
colt that could trot, sired by a trotting stallion and 
out of a thoroughbred mare, that he had a stock 
horse. The bay colt Electro, foaled April 22, 1903, is 
one of this sort. He is by Sutter 29069, record 2:18}, 
and his dam is the grandly bred thoroughbred mare 
Buchu by Buchanan, winner of the Kentucky Derby. 
Buchu's pedigree can be traced through a dozen 
generations in the American Stud Book, where she is 
registered. Electro is owned by Mr. E. C. I'eart o' 
Colusa, who bred him, and will be sold with the others 
catalogued for the sale at Colusa August 9th. In 
Electro there is high class producing blood combined 
with high class lace winning thoroughbred blood, 
some of the best Kentucky ever produced, and as Mr. 
Peart says he ought to gut a world beater. He stands 
15 hands high and weighs 1025, is as pretty as a picture 
and likes to trot. Has been jogged only but can show 
better than a 2:40 gait. Will make a valuable stud as 
well as a race horse. Is entered in the Stafford and 
Occident Stakes for 1906. Mr. Peart says, "This is 
my ideal colt and the man that gets him will get 
something good. " Send for a catalogue of the August 
sale. Address E. C. Peart, Colusa. 



6 



gvetfoKV ttttfc gftK>rt*mcwi 



[JCLY 8, 1905 




11 



CIRCUIT OPENS AT LOS ANGELES. 

Racine: is Best Ever Held in the Southern City and 



Attendance is Larsre. || 

^^igE^*!^^ E^^fj^T^ x ~ 



Los Angeles, July 3— With flags flying every- 
where and the band playing "Home Aint Nothin Like 
This" tho initial meeting of the new Los Angeles 
Driving Club and incidentally the first of the year on 
the Coast, opened at Agricultural Park this after- 
noon. The weather was a trifle hot for comfort but a 
big crowd was on hand just the samo and was treated 
to a great afternoon of 6port as the horses raced all 
afternoon and only one of the three races was com- 
pleted when darkness came. The meeting looks -like 
a winner right from the jura [i aud already many old 
timers have begun to call it "the best meeting ever 
held on the Coast." The traok was In good condition 
as the time will Indii e, the racing was keen through- 
out and there wa? a general run of enthusiasm during 
the entire afternoon. The auction pools and the pari 
mutuels were well patronized aad the betting promises 
to be lively during the meeting. The judges are Capt- 
J. C. Nawton, Dr. Wm. Dodge and C. A. Canfleld; the 
timers are Dr. Ralph Hagan, J. A. Fairchild and C 
O. Canfield while Chas. Saddler is doing the starting. 
These gentlemen seem to have the situation well in 
hand and no attempts were noticed to ''juggle with the 
cards." 

The first race was the Willard Stimpson Stake for 
2:13 pacers which brought out a field of seven side- 
wheelers ,with I. C. Mosher's chestnut horse Tidal 
Wave an equal choice over the field. They were sent 
away for the first heat with Doctor W. at the pole 
and as soon as the word was given Leggett took him 
out in front at a merry clip and beat the favorite from 
wire to wire in 2:08}. Old Tidal Wave with all his 
rigging was out for business, however, and after trail- 
ing Dr. W. to the head of the stretch he set his sails 
and nosed out the black gelding in 2:09. All this time 
Fred Ward had been riding in the ruck pretty easily 
with tne brown gelding Vision and he won the next 
two heats in such handy fashion that he looked to 
have the race at his mercy but Doctor W. came back 
in great shape this trip and barely nosed him out after 
a mile in 2:11. Then the race was postponed on 
account of darkness. 

Seven other good pacers scored down for the word 
in the Christopher Stake for the 2:27 class, and this 
race demonstrated among other things that the Los 
Angeles matinee horses can hold their own with the 
best of them, as after a very fast and hard five-heat 
race the winners of first and second moneys turned up 
in the pacers that parade in the amateur event when 
there is no bigger game to shoot at. C. J. Cleveland's 
handsome little mare Virginia by Bob Mason was the 
tip of the wise brigade and they played her like it 
was all over but cashing the tickets, bui she failed to 
land although she won the two fastest heats in the 
race and was beaten by very narrow margins in the 
other three. The winner turned up in Geo. A. 
Founder's chestnut gelding Glen by Glenwood, out of 
Nettle by Hobt. McGregor. He was driven in good 
style by Will Durfee and was "there or thereabouts" 
in each of the five heats. Argyle showed flashes of 
speed during the race and is undoubtedly a pacer of 
promise, but was hardly up to a bruising race of this 
kind. The other four starters caught the flag before 
the race was ended. 

M. J. Reams.' black gelding Oro Belmont was 
susposed to be the proper caper for the 2:45 trot, but 
Frank Wright had a little surprise party up his sleeve 
and won the only heats trotted with the big Falrose 
gelding, Pat Rose, owned by A. B. Rodman of Wood- 
land. Pat Rose has had the reputation of being a 
little erratic in his work but he did not lift his nose 
today aad both of the heats won by him were takon 
into camp pretty handily. Oro Belmont was c'ose up 
all the way in the opening heat and finished second, 
but went to a break in the second and the place went 
to the black gelding Charlie T. that was a good third 
in the first beat. Sam Washington, driving Lady 
Gipsy, had a collision with the fence in the first heat 
but neither the mare or her driver were damaged to 
any extent and she was allowed to start again. The 
summaries: 

The L J. Cl Istopher Stake, 2:27 olass pacing, purse $1000. 
Glen, oh g by c: :"nwooo>-Nettle by Hob:. McGregor 

(Durlee) 12 2 11 

Virginia, oh m by li b Mason (Delaney) 2 1 1 2 S 

Argyle, b s by Chan -- Derby (Springer) 4 3 4 S 3 

J. A. C , oh s by Dlrech (Washington) 6 4 3 4 ds 

John K. Conway, oh s by Diablo (Chadbourne) 3 ds 

Logancita, s m by Gen. L< .n (Knowles) 5 ds 

Bud, b s, breeding unknown (Baiter) 7 ds 

Tlme-2:12, 2:10, 2:11, 2:13, 2:14*. 

SECOND DAY. 

Los Angeles, July 4. — A holiday crowd of about 
8000 came out to Agricultural Park today and It Is 



safe to say that tbey all stayed for the finish as it was 
one of the greatest day's racing ever seen here and of 
variety enough to suit the most critical. There were 
three regular events and two unfinished races on the 
card and each one of them furnished something worth 
seeing. The 2:09 pace was naturally looked upon as 
the feature of the afternoon and it not only resulted 
in a little upset for the talent, but also in the fastest 
race of the year. Frank Wright's brown pacer, 
Kelly Briggs, has been working some sensational 
miles hero recently, and the wise brigade expected 
him to win with colors flying, but they got in wrong 
without a chance to hedge as the race resulted in a 
sensational straight victory for Ben Davies' handsome 
brown McKinney stallion, Zolock, who carries a new 
record of 2:06 as a result of his hard earned victory. 
The winner drew the pole for the first heat and when 
Vet Kent, who was driving him owing to the illness 
of Henry Delaney, took out in front and won from 
wire to wire in 2:10A, the talent thought little of it as 
the sidewheelers behind him appeared to have paced 
an easy mile, and Zolock tickets could still be had at 
a very cheap figure. In the second heat they went 
away boiling, and this time Kelly Briggs raeed head 
and head with Zolock to the half in 1 :03 and to the 
three-quarter in 1:35, and the wise ones figured that 
this was about as far as Zolock would care to go at this 
clip, but instead of backing up he came on faster and 
baat out the pacer from Woodland with something to 
spare in 2:0ti. Le Roi and Ira both caught the flag in 
this beat. In the third heat Jonesa Basler tried to 
turn the trick where Kelly Briggs had failed but the 
effort was without avail as Zolock raced them on even 
terms f> the three-quarter in 1:36 and then left them 
by the wayside by pacing the last quarter in .30} 
seconds, finishing out the mile in 2:06}. Zolock's mile 
la 2:06 reduces his record over three seconds and his 
two miles in 2:06} and 2:06 sets a new record for the 
Coast. He was far from being all in when he finished 
his mile in 2:06 and could probably have come close to 
the 2:05 mark if necessary. At any rate, Zolock stock 
is soaring tonight. 

Another good thing went wrong in the 2:20 pace 
when the much touted green pacer Fearnot was 
beaten in straight heats by James Long's bay mare 
Nellie R., driven by John Quinn. Fearnot is said to 
have shown some of the fastest work ever shown here 
by a green horse and, as there were only three horses 
in the race, was supposed to be in a soft spot; but the 
Pleasanton trained mare beat him to it, although it 
was necessary for her to pace the second heat in 2:10. 
Thefirst half of this mile was in 1:03 and the second 
quarter was in 31 seconds, but Nellie R. was equal to 
the emergency and looks like a 2:05 mare. 

There were five starters in the 2:11 trot, and after 
Ole had won the first heat in 2:10}, distancing H. D. B. 
and Robizola, he had rather an easy thing of it as 
neither Briney K. nor Lady Madison were ablo to 
give him much of a race. Walter Maben had the son of 
Silas Skinner out in the lead from wire to wire in each 
of the three heats, and did not appear to be in diffi- 
culty in any of them. Briney K. took second money 
from Lady Madison. 

After a well-judged drive in the unfinished pacing 
race Fred Ward won the long end of the purse with 
Vision in 2:09i|, while Pat Rose finished up the 2:45 
trot by beating Charlie T. and Kinmont after a great 
mile in 2:12} . The summaries: 

The Willard Stlmson Stake, 2:13 class pacing, purse $1000. 
Vision, brg by Vanqutsh-dam unknown. ..(Ward) 4 5 112 1 

Dr. W., bl s by Robt. Basler (Leggett) 1 2 6 2 1 2 

Tidal Wave, ch s by Nutwood Wilkes. . (Mosher) 2 1 2 3 3 3 

Bonnie Aisle, br m by Faustlno (Kent) 6 3 4 4 ds 

Frlskarina, brm by Bayswater Wilkts (Hoy) A 7 5 ds 

<jueen B , b m by Comet (Lindsay) 7 4 3 ds 

Cresoo Wilkes, bsby Nutwood Wilkes (Albertson) 3 6 ds 
Time— :32 1:04 l:3i 2:08* 

:3I* 1:03 1:38* 2:09 

:32 1:03M 1 36 2:09 S4 

:3iH 1:03* 1:37 2:11* 

:32 1:03* 1:38 2:11« 

:32! : 1:04* 1:36* 2:09* 

Five heats July 3. 

The Geo. A. Pounder Stake, 2:45 class trotting, purse $1000. 
Pat Rose, b g by Falrose-dam Patty Washington by Geo. 

Washington (Wright) 1 1 1 

Charlie T., bl g by Zombro (McDonald) 3 2 2 

Oro Belmont, bl g by Oro Wilkes (Reams) 2 7 4 

Kinmont. br g by McKinney (Durfee) 6 3 3 

Dew Drop, br m by Richard's Eleotro (Zlbbell) 4 5 6 

Sam Bowers, oh g by Jos Simpson (Lindsay) 7 6 4 

Zombretta, br m by Zombro (Ward) 5 6 ds 

Lady Gipsy, bl m by Henry McKinney (Washington) 8 ds 

Time— 2:15*. 2:15*, 2:I2><. 

Two heats trotted July 3. 

The Hotel Lankershlm Stake, 2:09 olass pacing, purse $1000. 

Zolook, br s by McKinney, dam Gazelle by Gosslper 

(Kent) 1 1 1 

Kelly Briggs, br g by Bayswater Wilkes (Wright) 2 2 3 

Jonesa Basler, br s by Robt. Basler (Owens) 3 3 2 

Ira, b g by Iris (Maben) 4 dla 

Le Roi, b g by Altamont (Lindsay) 5 dis 

Time— :31* 1:03* 1:36 2:10 
:32* 1:03 1:38 2:06 
:33}< 1:03 1:36 2:08* 



The William Garland Stake, 2:11 olass trotting, purse $1000. 

Ole, b g by Silas Skinner, dam by Nutwood (Maben) 1 1 1 

Briney K , b g (breedine unknown) (Durfee) 2 2 2 

Lady Madison, b m by James Madison (Ward) 3 8 3 

Robizola, b m by Robin (Abels) ds 

H. D. B., t g by Arthur Holt (Wright) ds 

Time— 2:10*, 2:1?, 2:1454-. 
The C. A CanBeld Stake, 2:20 class paotng, purse $1000 
Nellie R., br m by Wayland W , dam Topjy by Whlpple- 

ton (Qulnn) l l l 

Fearnot, bs by Lynmont (Stewart) 2 2 2 

Ring Rose, b g by Falrose (Reams) 3 8 3 

Time— 2:11, 2:10, 2:14><. 

THIRD DAY. 

Los Angeles, July 5. — Things cooled down to a 
normal temperature to-day at Agriculural Park and 
no miles in 2:10 or better were seen, but the racing 
was good just the same and every event furnished a 
good horse race. The most sensational feature of the 
afternoon was the great performance of the two-jear- 
old pacer Rockaway that won the first race on the 
oard. That he won the race was no surprise, as he 
was an even money favorite over the field, but the 
first mile was paced in the remarkably fast time of 
2:15}, which is a performance almost unheard-of for a 
two-year-old at this season of the year, and is a good 
mark for the baby pacers to shoot at all summer. 
There were only four starters in the race, and when 
the word was given for the first heat Rockaway went 
out to the front by himself and was at the quarter in 
:33 J and the half in 1:07, almost a dozen lengths in 
front of the others. Here Sam Hoy commenced to 
move up with the good Diablo colt McFadyen, and 
when they entered the homestretch he forced Rocka- 
way to a mild drive, but the effort was useless as the 
latter was pacing with plenty In reserve, and it looked 
like he could have paced pretty close to 2:12. Hoy 
tried different tactics in the second heat and sent 
McFadyen after the winner with a rush, and for a 
time it looked like he was on the right scent, for 
Rockaway made a break going around the first turn 
and for a second seemed in difficulty. He soon set- 
tled, however, and after taking the others to the half 
in 1:07 he had things all his own way and jogged 
home an easy winner in 2:19}. McFadyen, owned by 
E. D. Dudley, is a high-class colt and paced a great 
race, and might have a chance to trim Rockaway 
later in the season, but the latter was too much for 
him to day and the victory was a clean one. Rocka- 
way is a son of Stoneway, is owned by the local horse- 
man Geo. A. Pounder, and was driven by his old 
trainer, Jacob Brolliar. 

The 2:17 trot brought out a field of five and it 
developed into a hard fought and interesting contest. 
Will Durfee's Jupiter B. appeared to be the class of 
the race and was an even money favorite over the 
field in the auctions before the first heat. He won 
the race in good style, but the big Shadeland Onward 
stallion, The Commonwealth, had him stepping his 
best about all of the time and every heat was a hard 
one. Jupiter B. drew the pole and when the word 
was given Durfee took him out in front and was lead- 
ing at the half In 1:07} by quite a good margin. 
Here Lindsay commenced to let out some sail with 
The Common wealth and as they swung around the 
second turn was racing head and head with the 
favorite. As tbey came down the stretch both 
teamsters were driving hard and it appeared to be 
any one's race up to within one hundred yards of the 
wire where Jupiter B. went to a break and The Com- 
monwealth got the verdict in 2:15}. The latter made 
a bobble about the same time as Jupiter B. went Into 
the air, but was on his stride again in a hurry and 
reached the wire first by over a length. They started 
on the second heat in about the same fashion as in 
the first, Durfee having taken Jupiter B out in front 
again, with The Commonwealth close up. They 
trotted the whole mile close together and entered the 
stretch like a team, but Jupiter B. was out for busi- 
ness this time and won the heat by half a length in 
2:13}. The third heat was won by Jupiter B. in about 
the same fashion but In the last The Commonwealth 
went to pieces and Durfee had no trouble in winning 
in 2:16} from What Is It. The latter was third the 
tir.-t three heats and second in the fourth and trotted 
a good race but was not up to a hard race of this sort. 
Zambra and Mamie Elizabeth showed speed in spots 
but botn were erratic. 

The Charles Derby mare Economizer was a luke 
warm favorite over a field of six in the 2:17 pace but 
was not quite equal to the emergency and was third 
In the summary after a four heat race. The favorite 
was right out in front when the word was given and 
held the lead until they turned into the stretch where 
Vet Kent came along with Mistake and beat him at 
the wire in 2:13}. In the second heat the field was 
pretty well bunched to the three-quarters and it looked 
like a toss up between Mistake and Economizer but 
neither one was the winner as Fred Chad bourn came 
along with a nice burst of speed with the chestnut 
stallion Jonn R. Conway and beat them both easily in 
2:13. The winner of this race had things all his own 
way in the next two and won with something to spare 
in slow time. He made a disastrous break in the last 



July 8, I905j 



n 



heat and lost about fifteen lengths near the half mile 
pole but came out very fast and was going easily at 
the end. The summaries: 

The J. A. Falrchild Stake, two-year-old pacers, purse $500, 2 in 3 

Rookaway, ch c by Stoneway-dam untraced (Broiler) 1 1 

McFadyen. ch c by Diablo (Hoy) 2 2 

Maglidi. b f by Del Norte (Delaney; 3 4 

Siegfried, b c by Silver Coin (Ward) 4 3 

Time— 2:16^, 2:19'^. 

The Henry Berry Stake, 2:17 class trotting, purse $1000. 

Jupiter B., b g by Gen. Beverly, dam by Gossiper 

(Durfee) 2 111 

The Commonwealth, br s by Shadeland Onward 

(Lindsay) 12 2 5 

What Is It, g g by Direct (Chadbourne) 3 3 3 2 

Zambra b g by McKinney (H.Ward) 5 5 4 3 

Mamie Elizabeth, ch m by Red Regent (Maben) 4 4 5-1 

Time— 2;I5M, 2:13^, 2:14, 2:16/,. 

The Dr. Wm Dodge Stake, 2:17 class, paoing, purse $1000. 

John R. Conway, ch s by Diablo, dam by Legrand 

(Chadbourne) 3 111 

Mistake, br g by Trouble (Kent) 13 3 3 

Economizer, b m bv Chas. Derby (Silva) S 2 2 2 

Anna Turner, b m by Sterling (Ward) 5 4 4 ds 

Major Sultan, b g by Lord Sultan (Hackney) 4 5 5ds 

Time-2:13'/ 2 , 2:13, 2:17, 2:15. 
FOURTH DAY. 
"Dad" Trefry showed up a high class three-year- 
old by McKinney today, but after winning an easy 
heat with him in 2:17, the colt made a disastrous break 
in the second heat and was distanced. It was one of 
those unfortunate occurrences that come when least 
expected. Kenneth C, as the colt is called, was the 
favorite and it looked as if he could win without ex- 
tending himself as he was known to have great speed 
and won the first heat handily. He is out of the dam 
of the pacer Tom Carneal 2:08£, but is one of the best 
gaited three-year-olds on the track. After his break 
the filly Princess Louise by McKinney's son Coronado 
2:12£ went on and won in straight heats, her miles 
being in 2:20, 2:19 and 2:21, stamping her as a very 
high class filly. She is the first of the get of Coronado 
to start and is owned by Mrs. L>. J. Hastings of Los 
Angeles. Her dim is a mare by Woolsey, own brother 
to Sunol 2:08|. The records made by Kenneth C. and 
Princess Louise are the fastest made by any three- 
year-old trotters this early in the season for years, 
and the manner in which the fiily finished her race 
showed that had the colt kept his feet, a horse race 
would have been on which might have resulted in one 
or both being in the 2:15 list when it was ended. 

The 2:27 trot was second on the program and strung 
out to five heats, all being trotted within a second of 
the same notch. The big bay gelding Modoc by 
Daly took the first heat in 2:19J, and Old Hickory, a 
chestnut gelding by Aeolus, took the second in 2:19, 
but the brown gelding Wildbell, a son of Wildnut and 
the once champion yearling Bell Bird, owned by Capt. 
Ruhstaller of Sacramento, came on and won the next 
three heats in 2:18J, 2:18£ and 2:19$. Old Hickory 
took second money and Modoc third. This field of 
horses will make a race at any time in which the win- 
ner will be hard to pick a3 they are ali pretty evenly 
matched. 

In the 2:24 pace, 2:10 was equalled twice by the 

Bob Mason mare, Virginia, who wonin straight heats, 

with Glen, who beat her the first day, a good second. 

Mis3 Winn, a daughter of Demonio, won third money, 

and Bessie Barnes and Argyle were shut out in the 

last heat. The summaries: 

The H. N. Hsnderson St3ke, for three-year-olds without records 
purse $600. 

Princesj Louise, b f by Coronado, dam by Woolsey 

(Julian) 2 111 

Osoola, br c (Mosher) 3 2 2 2 

Kenneth C , br c by McKlnney-Mountain Maid by 

Cresco (Trefry) 1 dls 

Time— 2:17, 2:20, 2:19, 2:21. 

The Chas. Saddler Stake, 2:27 class trotting, purse $1000. 
Wild Bell, br g by Wildnut- Bell Bird by Electioneer 

(Freeman) 5 4 111 

Old Hickory, ch g by Aeolus (Wallace) 2 12 3 3 

Modoo, b g by Daly (Zibbell) 1 2 3 4 4 

Miss Mabel, bm (Maben) 4 3 5 2 2 

D E. Knight, b g by Lynmont (Abies) 6 6 6 5 5 

Talisman, ch g by Stelnway (Stewart) 7 5 4 dis 

Glennita.bm (Kent) 3 7 dis 

Time-2:19K, 2:19, 2:18!^, 2:18H, 2:19^. 

The Hotel Putter Stake, 2:24 class pacing, purse $1000. 
Virginia, ch m by Bob Mason, dam by Grandee. . (Maben) 1 1 1 

Glen, ch g by Glenwood (Pounder) 4 2 2 

Miss Winn, ch m by Djmioio (Reames) 5 5 3 

Bassie Barnes, blk m by Zombro (Sherwood) 2 3 dls 

Argyle, bh by Chas. Derby (Springer) 3 4 dis 

Time-2:10, 2:10, 2:12'/,. 

NOTES. 

Secretary A. W. Bruner is to be complimented upon 
the up-to-date and thorough manner in which the 
meeting is being managed and much of its success is 
due to his faithful efforts. The racing is started 
promptly, there are no delays between heats, every- 
thing goes on in a business like manner and there is a 
completeness about the whole thing that is commend- 
able. This is the first meeting of consequence held 
here in some time, but it has made a most favorable 
impression on both the horseman and the public and 
it is to be hoped that Los Angeles is in the game to 
stay. 

The trainers from the north are beginning to real- 
Iza that the horses trained in Los Angeles are pretty 
tough propositions and that miles around the 2:10 
mark can be expected any time they score for the 
word. So far the horses trained at the local track 
have won the lion '9 share of the money and it is rea- 



sonable to expect that they will continue to do so, but 
the trainers from the northern tracks are doing very 
well under the conditions and have no great cause for 
complaint. 

Chas. Saddler did the starting on Monday but since 
then the flag has been handled by Capt. J. C.Newton. 
The latter has been very successful and as a rule he 
his been able to send them away in good style without 
any delay. 

The fields have been rather small all week owing to 
sickness and lame horses in several of the stables. 
The racing, however, has been high class every day 
and makes up in quality what is lacking in quantity. 

The 2:13 pace was a great eye-opener for the week 
and was a race that will long be remembered. It is 
not often that the first three heats are won by differ- 
ent horses and all of them in 2:09J or better. 

The two-year-old pacer Rockaway that won the 
pacing stake on Wednesday and earned a mark of 
2:1 5^ is one of the most remarkable little horses one 
ever saw, not only because of his wonderful speed but 
also because of his peculiar markings and general 
makeup. He isn't much bigger than your fist, is a 
light sorrel, with a coat well sprinkled with white, 
has three legs that are white to the hock, a blaze face 
and two glass eyes. You can imagine that he wears 
the hopples when ready for busine?s. This is the horse 
that created quite a little talk this spring when he 
wascalled Little Jim and was purchased by bis present 
owner Geo. A. Pounder from Jacob Brolier, at a price 
that ran away up into the thousands. He was started 
once as a yearling at Tulare when he won a half mile 




ZOLOCK 3:06— Winner of 2:09 Pace 

heat race in 1:12 and is undoubtedly one of the fastest 
youngsters since the days of Directly for since coming 
to the local track he has shown a half in 1:02 and a 
quarter in 30 seconds and the limit of his speed is not 
known. He is by Stoneway, son of Strathway and his 
dam was a mare always used on the road and whose 
breeding is not known. 

The boys are still talking about Zolock 2:06 and the 
great race he won the other day and it goes without 
saying that it was one of the greatest races ever seen 
on the Coast, and it might be that if the son of Mc- 
Kinney and Gazelle was tuned up for a trip against 
the watch he might step a mile right close to the two 
minute mark. He has been-in the stud regularly up 
to a month ago and within the past two weeks has 
served a half dozen mares, so his two heats in 2:06 and 
2:06$ under the circumstances make him look pretty 
good. He raced in hopples for the first time the other 
day and although Henry Delaney did not drive him it 
proved that be knew what he was talking about when 
he said that all Zolock needed to be a 2:04 horse was 
the straps. 

Walter Maben gave the boys a little treat on 
Wednesday morning by stepping Mr. Canfield's black 
pacing gelding, Highball 2:08$ by Silkwood 2:07, a 
mile in 2:06$. Highball was not entered here in any 
of the regular events but a special free-for all has been 
substituted for the two-year-old trot and Highball 
will probably be seen in this. A mile this fast was 
hardly expected of him, but he did it well within him- 
self and paced each of the quarters at about the same 
rate of speed. He is a level headed, good mannered 
horse and should give a good account of himself if he 
starts with the free-for-allers. 

It is not often that a horse takes to the hopples as 
easily as did John It. Conway 2:13. Fred Chadbourne 
trained him all spring at Pleasanton without thinking 
of the straps and he was working easy miles In 2:12 
and was considered a right good prospect but his 
showing in the 2:27 pace on Monday was so bad that 
his trainer concluded that he was either sick or full 
of the devil. He was entered on Wednesday and as 
he appeared to be in good shape it was decided to 
start him, also to race him in hopples and he was 
given his firet warm up in pajamas about twenty 
minutes before the race. This seemed to be about 
what he wanted as he won the race handily and 
could have stepped faster than was asked of him. 

B. MoMAHAN. 



Aids to Action in Horses. 

About this time of the year horses with high action 
are always in keen demand. This is true of all seasons 
of the twelve-month, but just before the advent of 
warm pleasant weather there is always a little more 
urgency to the Inquiry than at other times of the 
season. This naturally draws attention to the high- 
stepper in a more than ordinarily poinled manner 
and as a result we receive letters asking how horses 
may be made to lift knees and hocks higher and 
generally, in a word, "how to improve their action." 
This is a hard proposition. Time and again we have 
detailed the most usual methods, such as the posts 
laid on the ground and over which the horse is led, 
being forced in that manner to raise his knees and 
hocks away up in order to get his feet over the 
obstacles. The ditch full of some yielding footing 
and other contrivances have also been described in 
reply to inquiries of this sort. We doubt if very much 
has ever been accomplished by an Inexperienced man 
attempting amelioration of action by 9uch methods. 

Action is a hard thing to make. Dr. Grenside has 
told readers of this journal in good set terms how 
essential to the development of action a good mouth 
Is. Without a really responsive mouth a horse will 
never show the highest class of /action in front or 
behind. A horse that has too soft a mouth will never 
go up on the bit enough to get the proper amount of 
headway on, while the horse that pulls hard gets too 
much head way on and is not under proper control. 
Hence it will be seen that the making of action in a 
horse begins at least with his breaking and while it is 
true that something can be done later to make a horse 
go higher in front, it is an uphill job, unless the 
breaking has been properly accomplished from its 
initial stages. Therefore those who are seeking to 
breed high-priced carriage horses must never lose 
sight of this fact. If they let their horses' mouths be 
ruined at the start they have lost half or rather more 
than half of the battle. 

Naturally this immense call for high-acting horses 
has caused many inventions to be exploited as just the 
thing to make horses go right. Various sorts of 
hopples, some with springs and some with rubb r 
pulleys, all designed to make the horse bend his legs 
fore and aft sharply at knee and hock, have been on 
the market, but none have ever gained any permanent 
sale. In the very nature of things rubber and springs 
can only aid the horse to jerk his feet up and then 
slam them down again on the ground, and that is no 
sort of action at all as action really is. Genuine high 
action of the typical sort is seen when the horse raises 
his front foot off the ground gracefully, brings it up 
high with a wide bend and then sets it forward and 
downward as though following the rim of a rolling 
wheel. That is about as unlike the jerky action 
described as it can be, and the judges nowadays give 
due weight to the possession of the right movement. 
Behind the hocks should be sharply flexed, carried 
close together, raised up high and then the foot set 
forward squarely beneath the body without any twist- 
ing inward or scythelike outward sweep. 

In order to obtain this sort of action it is necessary 
to breed for it, not try to make it. Those who are 
essaying to produce carriage horses should see to it 
that they use in the stud only stallions possessingsuch 
action and perfect balance of conformation. A horse 
may have a star-gazing way of going and threw his 
front feet away up into the air and yet be far from 
commanding a high price, simply because he lacks 
balance. He never can be taught to do anything with 
hocks, for the same reason that he is all in front. The 
horse that goes high in front is better than the one 
that goes not at all, but the aim of the breeder should 
be to get all the money, so to speak, and not only 
part of it. Hence the well balanced stallion is the one 
to buy. If he can go well fore and aft and has the 
typical conformation he is worthy paying a lot of 
money for, and will surely do his owner good. Then 
If the colts by such a sire are properly broken their 
natural bent will suffice admirably to produce the 
action and contrivances of one kind and another will 
not be required. There is no short cut to the pro- 
duction of hign-class carriage horses with the right 
kind of action. The way to get them is to breed for 
them from well selected parents, not to take animals 
bred for some other purpose and then try by moans 
of ingenious devices to transmogrify them into the 
semblance of the real article. The futility of the 
latter practice was well brought out at all the great 
horse shows of America the last two seasons. — 
Breeders 1 Gazette. 

Belle Hamlin 2:12}, the first trotter to bring fame 
to the late C. J. Hamlin as a breeder, is now owned 
by John Bradburn, for many years superintendent at 
Village Farm. The old maro has been bred to Prince 
Ideal. 

Strikel — If they don't give youJackson's Napa Soda 
when you ask for it. 



[JULY 8, 1906 




ROD, GUN AND KENNEL. 



Conducted by J. X. De WITT. 



Comiag Events. 



April 1-Sept. 10. Oct. 18-Feb. 1— Open season for taking steel- 
lead In tidewater. 
Aprli 1-Sept. 15— Closed season for lobstei-s and crawfish. 
April 1-Nov. 1— Trout season open. 
Judb l-.lan. 1— Open season for black bass. 

July 8— Saturday Fly-Casting Contest No. 8. Stow lake. 2:36 
p. m. 

July9— Sunday Fly Casting Contest No. !• St. « lake, 10 a. m. 
Sept. 10-Oct. Id-Close reason In tidewater for steelbead. 
Sept. 10-Oct. 16— Clor j season for catching salmon. 
Oot. 16-Nov. 15— Close season for taking salmon above tide, 
water. 

Nov. 1-Sept. 1— Open season for crabs. 

Nov. 15-Sept. 10— Season open for taking salmon above tide 
water. 



DOINGS IN DOGEOM. 



SANTA CR17. SHOW. 

The second annual show of the Pacific Sheep Dog 
Club (formerly The Pacific Collie and Old Enfilish 
Sheep Dog Club) began at Santa Cruz on Thursday 
with the following number of entries by breeds: St. 
Bernards 9, Great Danes 4, Deerhounds 1, Pointers 10, 
Setters 14, Dalmatians 2, Irish Water Spaniels 2, Field 
Spaniels 4, Cocker Spaniels 28, Collies 28, Old English 
Sheep Dogs 1, Bull Terriers 5, French Bulldogs 4, 
English Bulldogs 10, Boston Terriers 10, Airedale 
Terriers 5, Fox Terriers 6, Irish Terriers 6, Skye 
Terriers 2, Scotch Terriers 1, English Toy Spaniels 6, 
Japanese Spaniels 1, Daschundes 4, Pomeranians 1. 



Feb. 15-Sept. 1— Closed season for mountain quail, grouse and 
•age hen. 

Feb. 15-Oet. 15— Closed season for quail, ducks, etc 

April 1-Oct. 15— Close season for English snipe. 

June 27, 30— The Interstate Association's Grand American Han- 
dicap Target tournament, Indianapolis. Ind.; t!000 added money. 
Elmer U. Shaner, Secretary-Manager, Pittsburg, Pa. 

July Washington Gun Club. Blue rocks. Kimball-Upson 

grounds, Sacramento. Cal. 

July 1-Feb. 15— Dove season open. 

July 16— Mount View Gun Ulub. Blue rocks. Mount View, 
Cal. 

July 0— Empire Gun Club. Blue rocks. Alameda Junction. 
July 9— California Wing Club. Live pigeons. Ingleside. 
July 9, 23 -Fish and Game Gun Club. Blue rocks. San Jose. 
July 16— Union Gun Club. Blue rocks. Ingleside. 
July 30— Millwood Gun Club. Blue rocks. Mill Valley 
Junction. 
Aug 1-Oct. 15— Deer season open. 

Aug. 6— Golden Gate Gun Club. Blue rocks. Ingleside. 
Aug. 6— Blue Rock Gun Club. High-street grounds, Alameda. 
Aug. 29. 30-Interstate Association tournament. Blue rocks. 
Denver, Col. 

Sept. 9, 10— Empire Gun Club. Merchandise shoot. Blue rocks. 
Alameda Junction. 

Sept. 12, 13, 14— Interstate shoot. Blue rocks. Ingleside. Elmer 
E. Shaner, Manager. Pacific Coast Handicap under auspices of 
S. F. Trap-shooting Ass n., A. M. Shields, Secretary 

Sept. SO-Oct. 1— Two-day blue rock tournament. Biggs, Butte 
county. H. Haselbusch, manager. 

Sept. 30-Oct. l-BiggsGunClub. Two-day blue rock tournament. 
Biggs, Cal. 

Bench Shows. 

July 6, 7,8-Paciflc Sheep Dog Club. Seoond annual show. Santa 
Cruz. Geo. W. EMU, Secretary. A. K. C. rules. 

Aug. 15, 18— Orange County Agricultural Society. Middletown, 
N. Y. D. A. Morrison, Secretary. 

Aug. 23. 25— Rockland County Industrial Association. Bench 
show in New York City. A. A. Vanderbllt, Secretary. 

Aug. 31-Sept. 2— Newport Dog Show. Newport, R. L Francis M. 
Ware, Secretary. 

Sept. Stockton Kennel Club. F. A. Gelsea, Secretary, Stook- 

ton.Cal. 

Sept. 16— Englewood Kennel Club. Englewood, N. J. M. W 
Robinson, Secretary. 

Sept. 27, 28— Valley Fair Kennel Club. Brattleboro, Vt. 
Howard C. Rice, Secretary. 

Oct. 3, 8— Danbury Agricultural Society, Danbury, Conn. Q. 
M. Rundle, Secretary. Jas. Mortimer, Superintendent. 

Nov. 15, 18— Boston Terrier Club Specialty Club. Boston. F. 
H. Osgood, Secretary. 

Nov. 28-Djc. 1— Philadelphia Dog Show Association. Phila- 
delphia. J. Sergeant Price, Secretary. 

1906. 

Feb. 12, 15— Westminster Kennel Club. New York. Robt. V. 
MoKlm, Secretary. 

Feb. 20, 23— New England Kennel Club. Boston. Wm. B. 
Emery, Secretary. 

March 7, 10— Duquesne Kennel Club. Pittsburg, Pa. F. S. 
Steadman, Secretary. 

Field Trials. 

Aug. 15— Iowa Field Trial Club. Geo. C. Cooper, Secretary, P. 
O. Box 55, Des Moines, la. 

Aug. 23— North Dakota Field Trial Club. Inaugural trials. 
Grand Forks, N. D. A. E. Palmer, Secretary, Grand Forks, N. D. 

Sept 4— Nebraska Field Trial Association. 4th annual trials. 
O'Neill, Neb. H. H. McCarthy, Secretary. O'Neill, Neb. 

Sept. 6— Manitoba Field Trial Club, 19th annual trials. La 
Salle, Man. Eric Hamber, Secretary, Wlnnepeg Man. 

Sept. 21— British Columbia Field Trial Club, 3d annual trials. 
Ladner, B C. H. S. Rolston, Secretary, Vancouver. B. C. 

Oot. 23— Ohio Field Trial Association. Washington Court House, 
O. C. T. Phillips, Secretary, Columbus, O. 

Oct. 30— American Field Futurity Stake. For Pointers and 
Setters whelped on or after January 1, 1904, whose dams have 
been duly qualified. Robinson, 111., entries closed July 1. Address 
Am. Field Publishing Co., Chicago. 

Oct. 31— Connecticut Field Trial Club. Hampton, Conn, F. M. 
Chapin, Secretary, Pine Meadow, Conn. 

Nov. 6— Independent Field Trial Association. Hutsonvllle. Ilk. 
S. H. Socwell, Secretary, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Nov. 13— Illinois Field Trial Association. Robinson, 111. Wm. 
R. Green, Secretary, Marshall, III. 

Nov Indiana Field Trial Club, (Week following Illinois 

Champion Stake). C. F. Young, Secretary, Clay City, Ind. 

Nov. 21— International Field Trial Club. Ruthven, Ont. W. B. 
Wells, Honorary Seoretary, Chatham, Ont. 

Dec. 2— Continental Field Trial Club, Uth annual trials, . 

John White, Secretary, Hempstead, Long Island. 

Deo. Pointer Club of America (following the Continental 

trlais). Barber, N. C. C. F. Lewis, Secretary, 126 Maiden Lane, 
New York. 

DeSTtt- Eastern Field Trial Club Waynesboro, Ga. S. C. 
Bradley, Si .-rotary, Fairfield, Conn. 

1906. 

Jan Pacific Coast Field Trials Club, 23d annual trials. 



Bakersfleld, Cal. Albert Betz, Secretary, 201 Parrott Bldg. 
Francisco. 



and could not in any way affect the standing of a 
breed, as, no matter how they may be divided fof 
such show purposes, their characters would remain 
the same," as follows: 

Sporting: Bloodhounds, Otter Hounds, Foxhounds, 
Harriers, Beagles, Basset Hounds. Dachshunds, Grey- 
hounds, Deerhounds, Russian Wolfhounds, Irish 
Wolfhounds, Whippets, Pointers, Setters, Retrievers, 
Irish Water Spaniels, Water other than Irish Spaniels, 
Clumber Spaniels, Sussex Spaniels, Cocker Spaniels, 
Chesapeake Bay. 

Non-Sporting: French Bulldogs, Bulldogs, Mastiffs, 
Great Danes, Newfoundlands, St. Bernards, Colli* s, 
Old English Sheepdogs. Dalmatians, Poodles, King 
Charles Toy Spaniels, Blenheim Toy Spaniels, Ruby 
Toy Spaniels. Tri-color Toy Spaniels, Pekinese 
Spaniels, Japanese Spaniels, Italian Greyhounds, 
Chow Chows, Griffons Bruxellols, Pomeranians, 
Foreign Dogs, Pugs, Shlpperkes. 

Terriers: Airedale, Bedlington, Black and Tan, 
Bull, Boston, Dandie Dinmont, Fox, Irish, Scottish, 
Skye, Welsh, Yorkshire, Toy, White English. 

Which latter classification is now the official one. 



COLLIE NOTES. 

Glen Tana Collie Kennels of Spokane sold Ch. Bo 
Peep, a grand brood bitch and a good producing dam, 
to J. S. Klober. of Green River. 

Mr. Griffith advises us that he has for sale a list of 
the best stud dogs, brood bitches and best bred 
puppies in the West today. It will pay Collie fanciers 
to write for a descriptive circular. 



San 



TAPE OB SPECIE? 

Cash prizes or ribbons is a vexed question with 
many exhibitors on the Atlantic side of tne plantation 
and the argument is having a lively flailing out by 
the scribes, and fanciers who like to write to the 
papers. As to the merits of the case in the East, we 
are not prepared to say, circumstances and conditions 
there being beyond our sphere of observation. The 
champions, under both the silk and specie banners, 
are having their say, with the honors about even. 

The matter came up on the Coast when the S. F K. 
C. first decided to change the routine and award rib- 
bons and medals instead of coin. There was, of 
course, some opposition and much comment, but now 
the counter product has evidently come to stay, for 
this precedent has been religiously followed by about 
all of the Coast shows and seems to work, now, 
harmoniously. 

One point made by an Eastern writer and one whom 
we believe most thoroughly understands dog shows 
and all that pertains to the fancy, is that ''Ribbon 
shows are the happy medium through which a pleas- 
ant chance to win a few honors is afforded that would 
not be possible in the money shows where the big 
kennels and professionals sweep down and gobble up 
all the grist, which of course they have a perfect right 
to do, and by the same token the other exhibitor has 
a perfect right to show for a ribbon. A lot of fellows 
who cry out about shows doing this, that and the 
other, for exhibitors who do not help them out when 
they get In a hole, at least very few of them do, have 
very little idea of the expense and risk of even a rib- 
bon show, and especially is that risk great whea the 
show is held in some country place where the gate has 
to be guaged with a microscope." 

Shows shall not die: For 

ribbon prizes ! Nay : 
The Kennel Club goes to't, and 
the small, gilded specialty 
club) 

Does lecher in my sight. 
Let ribbon shows thrive 

Yea, let ribbon shows prosper, for many good 
reasons, among these we might urge the one, that if 
ribbon shows will help to cut down show expenses 
there might then accrue a fund for one legitimate 
expense, and we would thus avoid the unpleasant duty 
of respectfully.declinlng the contribution of requested 
gratuitous advertising. 



DOVE SEASON. 

The dove season opened on July 1st and closes 
February 15th next. Such is the State law, but this 
open season has been abridged in many counties, among 
them Santa Clara, Yuba and Placer, where the open 
season begins August 1st. 



A. K. C. CLASSIFICATION. 

The Slud Book Committee recommended the follow- 
ing divisions of breeds to the last A. K. C. quarterly 
meeting which suggestion was adopted and the recog- 
nized breeds of dogs are now known as sporting, non- 
sporting and Terriers. 

Regarding the division of breeds into sporting and 
non-sporting divisions the Committee wasof the opin- 
ion that il they are so divided the recommendation of 
allotment be the following: 

Sporting: Chesapeake Bay, Bloodhounds, Otter 
Hounds, Foxhounds, Harriers, Beagles, Basset 
Hounds, Dachshunde, Greyhounds, Deerhounds Rus- 
sian Wolfhouads, Irish Wolfhounds, Setters, Retriev- 
ers, Irish Water Spaniels, Water other than Irish 
Spaniels, Clumber Spaniels, Sussex, Spaniels, Field 
Spaniels, Cocker Spaniels, Pointers, Fox Terriers, 
Irish Terriers, Scottish Terriers, Welsh Terriers, 
Dindle Dinmont Terriers, Skye Terriers, Airedale 
Terriers, Bedlington Terriers, Whippets. 

Non-Sporting: French Bulldogs, Bulldogs, Mastiffs, 
Great Danes, Newfoundlands, St. Bernards, Collies, 
Old English Sheepdogs, Dalmatians, Poodles, Bull 
Terriers, Black and Tan Terriers, Toy Spaniels (as 
separately divided), Japanese Spaniels, Pekinese 
Spaniels, Yorkshire Terriers, Maltese Terriers, Italian 
Greyhounds. Chow Chows, Pomeranians, Pugs, Schip- 
perkes, Griffons Bruxellois, Boston Terriers, Chihua- 
huas, Foreign Dogs. 

••Your Committeedesires the association to consider 
tho advisability of dividing the breeds into three sec- 
tions, as follows: sporting, non-sporting and Terriers, 
believing that such a division might facilitate the 
judging of special prizes, which is the cause of this 
matter having been referred to the Committee. 

It would make fewer and more equal contestants 



In the June issue of the Kennel Gazette, the frontis- 
piece is a half tone picture of the Bulldog Ch. Felton 
Prince. The picture Is a grand illustration of type 
and an object lesson in one respect. The dog is jvell 
spread at the shoulders and has sturdy, almost 
straight forearms in contradistinction to some low- 
legged cripples that pass current for the upper crust 
In the breed. 

Dalmatians, notwitbstand icg the comparative scar- 
city of good ones, are in demand on the Coast We 
refer our readers to the announcement of Mr. Buck, 
of Sutter Creek, which appears on page 15 of this 
Issue. 

Mr. James Cole of Kansas Ci'y judged at a show 
held at Calgarry, Alta, N. W. T..Can., on Wednesday. 



Kennel Suggestions. 

There has been a good deal said of late about kero- 
sene and salt as a cure for follicular mange and those 
obstinate skin diseases that sometimes visit the best 
of regulated kennels. Several instances were first 
given in the English papers of the efficacy of this very 
simple remedy, and we are in a position to add our 
mite. 

Some time ago a Cocker Spaniel was afflicted with 
what seemed like blood poisoning-. The lips and legs 
and head swelled to abnormal size; great bulbs of soft 
mattery stuff formed on the sides, the shoulders and 
legs; looked like puff balls, and when pressed would 
exude a bloody matter; on some parts of the body 
dark blue spots would appear and on these being 
pressed, thin blood would spurt out, sometimes to the 
distance of a yard. The legs swelled out of all shape 
and were corrugated like an elephant's hide. At one 
time the flesh around the shoulders and neck took on 
the appearance of the rough part of an alligator's 
hide. The bair fell out in most of the affected parts 
but not in the others, although the dog was finally 
almost denuded of hair The animal suffered a lot of 
pain. The eyes became affected. Every handy remedy 
that had proved efficacious on ordinary cases of skin 
diseases was tried, but without result and in most 
cases seemingly made the dog worse. The skin at 
times burnt like fire, and was very red. 

Finally the kerosane and salt was tried. Two table- 
spoonsful of salt being put to the pint of kerosene. 
The salt is not soluble in the oil so we cannot see 
where it is of any benefit except perhaps as a cleanser. 
However, after twoapplications(the first being a very 
weak solution) the swelling began to subside, and the 
dog to liven up, and continued to do so for two days, 
when the animal was washed in a hot bath. Some 
remains of the original trouble being still visible the 
dog was done over again with the kerosene mixture, 
and this left on for a day, when after another hot bath, 
the dog's skin began to peel off In scales leaving the 
surface as smooth as a glove. 

All swellings disappeared, the legs and head assumed 
their natural form, appetite picked up and the dog 
began to take an interest in life once more, and Is al- 
most as lively as ever, and moreover, the hair is be- 
ginning to come in again and everything looks as if in 
a month or two the Cocker, will be as well as before. 
Th's was the worst case of three, though all were 
afflicted with exactly the same conditions. They 
were taken down very suddenly. They had been run- 
ning with several other puppies that have not been 
affected. Their quarters and feed and care have been 
of the very best, and the only way to account for the 
trouble is that when a neighboring field was spread 
with manure, they ate a couple of little puppies that 
had been thrown into the manure during the winter. 
This is not known as a fact but is presumed. 

The other puppies, brothers and sisters, have bad 
no troubles. Here is a case that is pertinent to the 
discussion as to the efficacy of this kerosene treat- 
ment and which we can personally vouch for We 
might say that with the idea of avoiding blistering 
the skin, the first time the kerosene was applied it 
was diluted with water, but that subsequently when 
it was found that this did not take hold as expected 
the full strength was applied with no blistering effects. 
In another case of obstinate skin disease that had re- 
sisted all the ordinary treatments, two or three appli- 
cations of the oil brought out a splendid coat with no 
recurrence of the trouble. The coat does not seem to 
be damaged in any particular, in fact the coat Is Im- 
proved. The low cost of the remedy brings it within 
the reach of all. Particular care must be taken after 
the oil is applied that the dog is kept quite warm and 
free from draughts, or salivation may set In and all 
sorts of complications ensue that generally end in 
death — The American Stock- Keeper. 



JuLy 8, 1905J 



9 



Big Basin Road Project. 

The importance of a direct road into the Big Basin 
Park from the Santa Clara Valley, San Jose being 
the Initial starting point, is felt to be an urgent neces- 
sity. The construction of a broad boulevard, from 
the valley to the park, that will always be open to 
teams and automobiles, by the most direct route, is a 
project now in the hands of a joint committee com- 
posed of representatives of the Sempervirens Club, 
Native Sons of the Golden West, and Santa Clara 
County Pioneers. An appeal has been promulgated 
in the name of these worthy associations, to the people 
of this State, to build this* much needed highway by 
public subscription. 

So well has the movement been received thus far 
that several individual subscriptions of $500 each have 
been received. 

The Big Basin Road Committee composed of: Arthur 
M. Free, Chairman; Andrew P. Hill, Secretary; Bank 
of San Jose, Treasurer; J. G. McMillan, Surveyor; W. 
P. Lyon, L. A. Spitzer, Jackson Hatch, Arthur M. 
Free, A. P. Hill, A. P. Murgotten, Finance and 
Executive Committee; Joint Committee— Alex. P. . 
Murgotten. George S. Andrews, L. A. Spitzer, A. R. 
Wood hams, W. D. J. Hambly, Page Hollister, Pioneer 
Society; Rev. E. S. Williams, Dr. A. E. Osborne, W. 
P. Lyon, A. P. Hill, Lester Morse, Judge J. R. Welch, 
SempervirensClub; Arthur M. Free, Fayette Mitchel- 
t>-ee, H. W. McComas, G. B. Cottle, Fred Doerr, Chas. 
A. Thompson, Native Sons, have issued a circular de- 
scriptive letter together with subscription blanks 
which are being mailed to many individuals with 
the request for a donation for the laudable purpose 
explained. 

There has been a ready response in nearly every 
instance. A letter of inquiry addressed to Mr. Arthur 
M. Free, Chairman, or in fact, any of the above named 
committee, will meet with prompt attention. We 
recommend the enterprise to all of our readers who 
are interested in the development of this State to help 
make accessible this great natural attraction. The 
early completion of this road will make the Big Basin 
easily reached by a drive of about seventeen miles 
from the Santa Clara valley — from Saratoga Summit 
to the Park; a road open at all times and thus making 
the Park accessible to the whole State 

The State Redwood Park (Big Basin) and its Plio- 
cene forests, lying in the Santa Cruz mountains ten 
miles in an air line from the Santa Clara Valley, forty 
miles south of San Francisco, seventeen miles north- 
west from Santa Cruz, five miles distant from the sea, 
nineteen miles southwest of San Jose and ten miles by 
road from Boulder Creek, is a feature unique among 
California's marvels. 

It is one of the few spots that, owing to its peculiar 
geographical and geological formation, has retained 
the°wealth of flora and beauty of the Pliocene Age. 
It has been bequeathed to us in its primitive condi- 
tion, almost unmarred, with itsgigantlc Sempervirens 
trees (some having a diameter of more than twenty 
feet) the oldest and largest of their species. The 
rugged and romantic scenery of the Basin is especially 
pleasing. It Is surrounded by a mountain rim, 
traversed by great ridges of forest land3 and deep 
wooded canyons with their gorges, and waterfalls and 
sparkling streams filled with trout contribute greatly 
to its interest. Its wonderful forests (said to contain 
fifty-four varieties of plants), its moss covered rocks 
and graceful ferns, wild azaleas and tiger lillles, tend 
to make„a scene that for beauty, educational purposes 
and general interest stands unrivalled by any forest 
in the world. Its scientific and practical value to 
mankind is widely recognized. It is in a warm belt, 
possesses a peculiarly hygenlc climate, owing to the 
topography of the country, and iB in a district where 
frost is seldom known. This Park is destined to be- 
come as famous for a winter as it is for a summer 
resort. It has excellent facilities for camping. A 
survey made in June of the present year, 1905, shows 
that the altitude at the oamping points selected 
varies from 1100 to 1500 feet. The elevation of the 
rim surrounding the Park varies from 1600 to 2600 
feet above the sea. 

The Park can be made a place of such attraction 
that all tourists who visit California will feel that they 
should see at least the giant redwoods of the Big 
Basin before returning to their homes or completing 
their tour. 

GOSSIP FOR SPORTSMEN. 



committee who will select a site upon which will be 
erected an elegant club house. The club will be in- 
corporated with a capital stock of $50,000, divided 
into shares of $100 each. The club membership will 
be limited to 100. 

TRUCKEE IN LINK. 

Early in June some fifty of Truckee's representative 
citizens and sportsmen met for the purpose of hearing 
Deputy Fish Commissioner Welch of this city and 
Game Warden Neate of Sacramento and also to com- 
plete the organization of a local association — The 
Truckee River Fish and Game Protective Association. 

The officers elected were: William Rowlison, presi- 
dent; W. O. Blinn and R. C. Koepkie of Iceland, vice- 
presidents; F. M.Rutherford, secretary and treasurer; 
Trustees, J. C. Hadley of Floriston, W. H. Rapp, 
Herman Wilkie, Chas. Cole and Stewart McKay. 



HUNTING DOGS. 

The season is now at hand when sportsmen will be 
eager to find a suitable dog to work to the gun during 
the coming open season. For upland shooting the 
Setter or Pointer has the call. For duck shootiDg the 
Irish Water Spaniel is the choice of many marsh 
hunters. Notwithstanding this climate is free from 
the rigorous conditions prevailing in the East and 
Middle West during the winter ducking soason, or 
even which prevails up north, still it is asking too 
much of a short or thin coated dog to work in the 
water, for weather conditions here are cold enough at 
times to cause a dog much suffering. 

Finding a suitable bird-dog is one of the hardest 
possible things for the hunter. Some acquaintance 
may recommend a dog to him and claim for it every 
good quality with which a kind providence has en- 
dowed the denizens of dogdom, yet when he inspects 
the animal the hunter will see nothing extraordinary 
abouthim and think he issimply and ordinary "purp." 

Frequently the hunter, especially if he is not 
familiar with dogs or type, will allow the general ap- 
pearance of the animal to have great weight with him. 
He may disapprove of the way the dog hangs his 
head, or because he is not always snooping around as 
if he were sniffing out game, or about to point. 

The only thing about a dog which always is doing 
these things which makes the average hunter think 
he wants him is the fact that it always keeps the 
spectator in a 8tate of suppressed excitement. This is 
not the quality of a high class dog, and nine times out of 
ten that style of dog is a false pointer and seldom an 
effective ranger. 

Few high class dogs of today have a great deal of 
tail action or style when ranging at speed, and only 
9how this characteristic when nearicg the game. 
The reason for this is due to the natural tendency of 
conservative energy. A great deal of unnecessary 
energy is consumed by excessive tail action and excite- 
ment. Many experienced trainers are coming to doubt 
the capacity of a dog which seems to be "making 
game" all the time. 

When is a dog broken? This is another question 
which seems to bother many. Dogs, which under the 
handlingof one man show the greatest intelligence, are 
frequently singularly lacking in sense when another 
takes charge of them. These people seem to think a 
dog will remember anything when it is once taught. 
This is not true. A dog which is well broken this 
season is apt to forget a great portion of his teachings 
when next year comes and has to be broken over 
again. 

Many of the finest dogs are sensitive and seem to 
fear having strangers near them. They are not timid 
when working after the game, however, and their 
owners need to remember that some of the best dogs 
in the country have this fault. Some Deerhounds 
will quit a trail and turn tail to it if they meet a 
stranger in the woods. Foxhounds, Beagles and even 
some Greyhounds seem to be afflicted this way, but if 
care and patience are shown they can soon be broken 
of this faulty habit. 

The Sutter Dove Club, composed principally of 
Sacramento sportsmen has been organized with a 
membership of twenty-two. The club has secured a 
lease of the McDermot tract near Hangtown Crossing 
and the preserve has been posted against poachers 
and trespassers. ^ 

AT THE TRAPS. 



second, W. R. Murdock and "Slade" divided third 
and fourth, W. S. Wattles fifth, Second class — H. 
Klevesahl first, F. Knick, McElwaine and C. Ashlin 
divided second, third and fourth money. Third 
class — C. Cuneo first money, Harvey second, E. Bowen 
third. B. Patrick and W. Johnson divided fourth. 

Following the club shoot five contestants shot for 
the Phil B Bekeart challenge cup — the previous win- 
ner, J. W Bradrick, not being on the field — A. J. 
Webb won the match, breaking 90 targets out of 100. 
This is the third time Webb has won this contest. 
The score 90 i9 the lowest yet made in the event. 

Club race, 100 targets (50 on the straight bulkhead, 
50 Sergeant system) $100 added— $25 for each class — 

Champion Class. 

Schultz, Ed 25 22 20 83 90 

Forster, Ed 23 23 22 22—.' I 

Webb 23 23 23 19— 8H 

Feudner. 24 20 23 20— 97 

Iverson 23 19 21 22—85 

Halglit 22 20 20 20-82 

Nan man IK 18 19 20—75 

First Class. 

Goloher 24 23 23 19-89 

Schultz, F 20 21 22 22—85 

Murdook 21 17 20 20 -78 

•'Slade" 20 19 18 21—78 

Wattles 20 20 19 18—76 

Potter 18 16 19 11— 74 

Donohoe 16 13 22 21—72 

Second class 

Klevesahl, H 22 24 20 20—86 

Knick 22 22 14 18—76 

MoElwalne 15 22 19 20—76 

Ashlin 19 15 21 21—76 

Bruns 16 20 18 16—70 

Shields 11 15 18 15—59 

Third class. 

Cuneo 23 19 15 19—76 

Harvey 19 18 18 16-71 

Bowen 16 17 20 17— 7o 

Patrlok 16 19 17 17—69 

Johnson 19 16 16 18—69 

Sylvester, Dr 19 15 17 16—67 

Phil B. Bekeart perpetual challenge cup race, 100 
targets, 16 yards, $5 entrance. 

Webb... 17 18 18 19 18—90 

S;hultz,E 17 18 18 16 18—87 

Haight 15 17 18 18 15-83 

Feudner 18 17 18 18 11—82 

Nauman 16 17 16 14 12—75 



NEW TERRITORY FOR SPORTSMEN. 

Within a comparatively short period new country 
for the angler and hunter will be opened by means of 
several projected lines of railroad. 

One road contemplated will be constructed from 
Weeds station on the Southern Pacific in Siskiyou 
county to Klamath Falls, a distance of about 100 
miles. This region Is practically unknown to the 
angler and devotee of rifle or shotgun. 

The California Northwestern Railway has within a 
3"ear or so extended its line first to WillUts and re- 
cently to Sherwood, Mendocino county, thus opening 
up for the sportsman a region hitherto only accessible 
by vehicle or horseback, a trip denied for obvious 
reasons, to the main body of sportsmen. 

The proposed electric line, which will tap the coast 
shore region between this city and Santa Cruz, will 
give access to a territory bountiful in the extreme for 
outing, camping, trout and sea fishing, deer and small 
game shooting. 

A SWELL MARY8VILLE CLUB. 

The recently organized Tule Hunting Club of 
Marysville has leased nearly 18,000 acres of what is 
claimed to be "the finest shooting grounds in the 
world," for a period of ten years. The opportunities 
for duck shooting, trout and black bass fishing, com- 
bined, are unequalled. The Initiation fee for member- 
ship is placed at $100, a low figure. It Is expected the 
club will be fully organized within a short period. 
Col. E. A. Forbes, Dr. J. H. Barr, A. O. Frye, C. F 
Aaron, H. D. King and J. W. Stewart compose a 



A big team shoot will come off at the grounds of 
the Vallejo Gun Club on Sunday, July 23d. The fol- 
lowing clubs will enter five man teams: Golden Gate, 
Union and Empire Gun Clubs of San Francisco, Santa 
Rosa Gun Club, St. Helena Gun Club, Vallejo Gun 
Club and Hercules Gun Club of Pinole, Cal. Each 
club is privileged to enter as many teams as desired. 
The race will be for a trophy — best two out of three 
wins for permanent ownership, 25 targets and $5 
entrance per team. The winning team to name place 
of next contest for the trophy. 

The committee In charge of the shoot will be: M. A. 
Clark, Vallejo Gun Club, Captain of the day; Thos. 
L. Lewis, Secretary of the Union Gun Club, Manager; 
and J. W. Ellas, Secretary of the Vallejo Club; F. W. 
Hesse, Jr , Captain of the Santa Rosa Gun Club; 
Edgar L. Forster, Secretary of the Golden Gate Gun 
Club: J. B. Hauer, Secretary of the Empire Gun Club; 
W. Hanson, Captain of the Hercules Gun Club and 
W. Sink, Captain of the St. Helena Gun Club. 

This shoot will be well attended by members of the 
clubs mentioned and visiting shooters. 



The Vallejo Gun Club shoot, June 25th, was well 
attended. O'Hara, Chappell, Clark, P. Magistrini 
and C. Mayfield of Napa were the high guns for the 
day. C. Drake was high gun in the club race. The 
club grounds are now fitted up with two sets of traps 
Among the latest names on the membership list are 
those of C. Mayfield and W. White At the last shoot 
a number of team events were shot. Captain Chap- 
pell's team prevailed over Captain Drake's. 

The scores in the regular club shoot at 25 targets 
were: Drake 24, Chappell 23, Comfort 22, Clarke 21, 
Carter 20, Mayfield 19, P. Magistrini 18, Burnett 18, 
O'Hara 18, Shouse 18, Dr. Turner 18, Wisecarver 17, 
Coe 17, S. Magistrini 16, Elias 16, Evans 16, W. Beve- 
ridge 14, Rose 13, Dr. Arnold 12, G. Murray 11. 

A high wind was blowing during the shoot, which 
accounts for the lower percentage of several shooters. 
The club is in an exceedingly prosperous condition 
and is planning many new improvements, among 
which are a grandstand for the ladies, as many of the 
wives and friends of the members find a great deal of 
enjoyment in attending the shoots. Another bulk- 
head and set of traps, which will make three altogether 
will be put in and will be ready this season, when the 
big shoot is held. 

At the Bakersfield Blue Rock Club shoot, June 25th, 
F. N. Schofield made the highest approximate aver- 
age, 63 out of 70 targets, 90,° '; Clem Wilson was next 
with 87%, 110 out of 115. Captain Shatter, U. S. A., 
scored 84%. There is much enthusiasm over the sport 
in Bakersfield and the club is in a flourishing con- 
dition. The scores made at this shoot were: 

Shot at Broke Per Ct. 

Soofleld, F. N 70 63 90 

Wilson, Clem 115 100 87 

Shatter, Captain 115 97 84 1 3 

Bakeman 70 55 78 1-2 

Tupman, Arthur 126 98 78 1-3 

Getchell, C. E 110 88 75 1-2 

Henry 185 90 72 1-2 

Price, George 55 39 71 

Oswald, John 90 63 70 

Jewett, P 180 83 69 1-6 

Jewett, Wright- 100 96 66 

Gilbert, Claud 80 51 63 3-4 

Whitney, Al 105 58 55 14 

Packard, Bert 145 80 55 1-ti 

Cartwright •• HO 64 53 1-3 

Hochhelmer, M 70 35 50 



Twenty-six guns lined up before the bulkhead on 
the 2d inst. at Ingleside at the Golden Gate Gun Club 
shoot. Weather conditions were almost too warm for 
comfort and undoubtedly affected a number of scores. 

The winners In the club race, 100 targets, were: 
Champion class — E. L. Forster and Ed Schultzdlvlded 
first and second money, A. J. Webb third money, M. 
O. Feudner fourth, aud M. J. Iverson fifth money. 
First class— W. J. Golcher first money, F. Schultz 



Sunday, June 25th, a shoot came off between San 
Luis Obispo Gun Club and Paso Robles Gun Club 
shooters. The former club won by a big margin— 148 
to 117. Six events were on the card and a barbecue 
was an appetizing and appreciated side issue during 
the luncheon hour. The first prize in the merchan- 
dise event was annexed by Curtis of Pa60 Robles. 

The results in the team shoot were: 

San Luis team — Younglove 14, Van Schaick 14, Mo 
Caffreyll, Van Scoy 13, Guthrie 10, Soto 14, Maino 
12, Taylor 14, Holmesley 8, Estudlllo 16, Greenfield 11, 
Call 11; total 148 out of 200. 

Paso Robles team — Johnson 8, Brown 8, Tognaz- 
zinll2, Cullean 12, L. McDaniel 8, Ooley 12, Gaxiola 
5, Janney 11, Mader 10, Curtis 9, J. McDaniel 11, 
Hamilton 11; total 117. 

James Drumgoole of Anaconda won the state cham- 
pionship medal at the recent Bczeman tournament. 
He also annexed the medal for high average. He was 
the receplent of a handsomeleatber gun case presented 
by the Anaconda Gun Club for making the best con- 
secutive run of breaks— 290 straight, a pretty good 
record. 

The old State Fair grounds at Sacramento are now 
a thing of the past, the tract having been out up into 
building lots The favorite trap shooting grounds 
for Sacramento sportsmen passed at the same time. 
The location for the new fair grounds Is now in full 
preparation for the coming fair in September. Frank 



p 



10 



[July 8, 1905 



Newbertand L. S. Upson, representing the Capital 
ClU Blue Rock Club, have been Inspecting a location 
for a new shooting ground within the park and have 
opened negotiation! with the society for a lease of 

same. 

A meeting at the traps on June 18th between repre- 
sentatives of the Windsor and Guerneville Gun Clubs 
brought the Windsor shooters to the Rood by 13 
target" The summaries in a number of 10 target 
races were as follows: g ( ? ( 

MoCutcnan g g 4 4 4 4 (> 

Wilson B g 7 g 9 7 .. .. 

Young 7 6 5 

Pyne.. 5 5 

McCraclien £ .... 

Bogart 4 j g 5 .. .. 

Jf e , ad ;-i; 8656347 .. 

Trlpplett 5 6 7 7 5 8.... 

Gorsule 5 2 8 10 7 7 .. .. 

Abbey 6 4 

Murray 6 6 



and fly-fishing can be had in an almost unfished 

territory. 

There are two routes into the valley, one by rail- 
road to Oakdale, where the angler can take the Sierra 
Railway to Chinese Camp, and thence by horseback 
into the valley; the other route is by railroad to Mer- 
ced and then by stage to his destination. The trip 
going and coming will take several days, but it is 
worth the time for a vacation. 

In the valley the angler can find good accommoda- 
tion at University Camp, which is maintained by the 
students of California and Stanford Universities. 



Trout fishing at Boca is reported excellent. Carlos 
G. Young and H. W. McNoughton left (or this famous 
Truckee angling resort a week ago. James S. Turner, 
J. Burns and wife and Joseph Dober will spend the 
coming week at that point. 



McGtu . 

Walla 2 

Wiseman 4 

Butcher 



Thomas C. Kierulff, the popular secretary of the 
Fly-Casting Club, together with his wife and son, are 
enjoying trout fishing in the vicinity of Dutch Flat. 



The results at Kenilworth Park on the 18th Inst, 
at the second shoot of the Peta uma Club were 

as follows: Club race 20 targets- .Drees 15 Clark 1., 
Atkinson 6, Dickson 13. Lopus 13, fteiger 14 Dr. HaD 
11, Goodwin 10, H F Smith 5, Bert Ayers 10, J. King 
10 Laf ranch i 4 Densmore 5. Tony Mego and Joe 
Clark were "high guns" for the shoot. ^ 

At the ehooi Held June 25th the scores in the club 
race, out of a possible 20 targets, were as follows: 
Summ«rfield 18, Velgar 11, Mego 14, Clark 16. G. 
Drees 10. Carter 13, Steltz 10, E Drees 12, SuUivan 8, 
DuokprH, H*-.per7, Murphy 14, Focha 7, Beggs 8, 
Limebaugh 8, Jos. Steiger 9. 

There has been quite a change made at the Ingle- 
side trap shooting grounds. The blue roc* bulkheads 
have been removed from the extreme east end of the 
grounds and set up again on the eastern portion of 
the live bird section. . , .« v 1. 

This change will be found to be decidedly for the 
better The western portion of the shooting ground 
Is well sheltered and surrounded by high fencing 
which is quite an advantage to the shooter when the 
westerly trade winds are hurtling across the outfield. 

Another advantage is that the shooters can now do 
all of tbeir trap shooting in one enclosure conveniently 
and without a rather long walk from one section to 

the other. 

The California Wing Club live bird shoot for July 
Is the card at Ingleside tomorrow. 

Blue rock shooters are invited to attend the regular 
monthly shoot of the Empire Gun Cub at Alameda 
Junction tomorrow. 

The Bakersfield trap shooting grounds aie equipped 
with a Leggett trap. 

WITH THE ANGLERS. 



The streams of the Yosemite Valley are annually 
"fished to death," so to speak. None but expert 
anglers, however, can usually show results for their 
efforts. Tradition has it that the Indians of the 
valley are the only fishers for trout who have been 
successful to any extent. The Indians are essentially 
market fishermen, and supply the hotels and camps 
with almost all of the "fresh trout" in the valley 
hotel cuisine That the Indians are infallible has 
been proven a myth time and again, when the know- 
ing angler went after trout. Good fishing in the 
valley is now to be found only at remote waters, 
where the general run of visitors do not care, or do 
not know, where to go. Joseph Leidig is a young 
man who was born in the valley and is a most skilled 
angler. Leidig knows every stream and rock in the 
Yosemite and Hetch-Hetchy valleys. 



Black bass fishing has been excellent recently in 
Ballard 's lake, near Olivette on the California North- 
western Railway. The killing lure now is a fly, red 
bodied, tinsel wound, with a canary tail and hare lug 
wings. This fly, on a No. 6 sproat, was found to be a 
killer by an angler at the lake, two weeks ago. Jack 
Sammi sent one down to John Benn, who immediately 
tied a number of flies according to pattern. They 
were found to be just what the doctor ordered. 

Black bass Ashing on the Russian river riffles be- 
tween Guerneville and Russian River Heights Is 
reported to be excellent. Fishing for bass in the 
river in the vicinity of Duncans is also good. A 
minnow bait is the proper lure for the river fishing. 

Striped bass fishing in Lake Merritt is productive 
of a deal of sport at present. On Sunday last there 
was a fleet of boats out about forty fish wera landed. 
Clam bait is the proper caper for catching bass In 
the lake President W. Price landed his first base, a 
four-pounder on the 4th. He went out on a venture, 
a regatta was booked there for the day and this prom- 
ised anything but sport for an angler. Nevertheless 
he rowed over to a spot indicated by John Fatjo, 
chummed with a dozen or so fat clams, put bis tackle 
over and before bis baited hook struck bottom he 
had a strike and caught a nice bass. Other anglers 
out on Tuesday returned to the boat house sunburnt 
and disguestod. 

A report received this week states that striped 
bass are exceedingly numerous again off San Pablo 
and that the fish average somewhat heavier than a 
few weeks ago. 

The San Antone has been prospected fruitlessly by 
several fishermen recently. Mr. Shattuck of the 
Petaluma Gun Club is credited with a take of sixteen 
fine fish a week ago. 

Sam A. Heller, a courteous gentleman and a true 
sportsman, passed away in this city last Sunday. Mr. 
H-ller was a popular member of the San Francisco 
Fiy-Casting Cluband alsoof the California WingClub. 
He was an enthusiastic angler and a most congenial 
comp mion on the stream In business circles of this 
city be bad the esteem and confidence of his asso- 
ciates and he was also an appreciated figure in a select 
social circle. His demise Is mourned by many friends 
with whom we tender to his surviving relatives our 
shrcere sympathy. 

Anglers who, have made the trip to the Hetch- 
Hetchy Valley are loud 10 their praises of a district 
whicn. It U claimed, is an ideal trouting country. A 
number of stream*, tributaries of the Tuolumne river 
—the Middle Pork, South Fork, Cherry CreeH, 
Rancheria Creek and Tiltlll Creek, are teeming with 
rainbow and brook trout of good size. In the lakes of 
this region, Elinor, Laurel, Harden and Tenalya, 
besides numerous o.hersmaller bodies of water, spoon 



John Butler returned from Castella on Wednesday. 
He spent a week at that point enjoying some spirited 
fly-fishing. 

Trout fishing at that point must be excellent, or 
will be until the spawning salmon arrive up river, for 
Judge K. M. Jackson, among others, has caught man v 
fish there. Last week Mr. Fred M. Halght received 
from the judge, a rainbow trout, that weighed dressed 
5J pounds. 

Salmon are running plentifully at Santa Cruz, 
Capitola and Monterey. Many fine heavy fish are 
being taken daily by anglers out in boats, the Wilson 
spoon seems to be the tempting tid bit (?) for the fish 
just at present. 

Otto Feudner and Ed Schultz stopped over at 
Rogue river on their return frcm the Northwest 
tournament at Portland. They spent several days 
on that grand Oregon trout stream at and near the 
fish hatchery some thirty-three miles from Metford, 
Or. Mr. Malcolm S. McKeown, a Metford business 
man, looked after the two anglers while in his baili- 
wick and they received royal treatment. 

The fishing was excellent, many large-sized rain- 
bows were taken. The Rogue river fish are "dead 
game sports" (after getting in the creel), they strike 
with a rush and put up a lusty fight, and our two 
shooters had most enjoyable sport. 



was won by Mr. W. Stannard, and first amattur aver- 
age by Mr. A. Molle, both shooting Peters' factory 
loaded shells. 

Quite a remarkable score was made on the grounds 
of the Indianapolis Gun Club, June 3d, by Mr. G. M. 
Kanouse of St. Paul, Ind. He was high man for the 
day, breaking 96% and attributed his excellent score 
to the use of Peters' factory loaded high gun shells.** 

At Ardmore, Ind. Ter., June 5th, 6th and 7tb^ 
Peters' shells were decidedly in evidence. Mr. C. F. 
Renst was high amateur and Mr. J. S. Day high pro- 
fessional. 

At Dublin, Ind., June 8th, Mr. C. A. Young was 
high gun, Mr. L. H. Reed second, and Messrs. Kirby, 
Peters and Clark tie for third. The entire bunch 
using Peters' shells, of course. 

On June 9th at Ruffsdale, Pa., Mr. R. S. Dennlker 
won high average, Mr. Ed Hickey second, and Mr 
Robert West, third— all using Peters' factory loaded 
shells. 

A SPLENDID 16-GAUGE SCORE. 

One of the greatest scores that has come to our 
notice of late, made with a sixteen bore gun, was the 
performance at Trinidad, Colo., on June 15, Mr. F. 
W. Caldwell, shooting a 16-gauge Parker gun, made 
a score of 72 out of a possible 75, making a straight 
score of three twenty-fours out of a possible twenty- 
five. This is a wonderful performance with a 16-gauge 
gun, and a short time previous vlr. Caldwell broke 48 
out of 50 at 16 yards with bis 16-gauge Parker. 

At London, Ont., Mr Harry Marlott, with the 
Parker gun, on June 8th, at 17 and 21 yards rise 
scored 162 out of a possible 175, winning high average. 
This is a pretty good record. 

Mr S. C Yocum of Shamokin, Pa., at the Shamo- 
kin Gun Club broke 47 out of 50 and 96 out of 100. 
M>\ Yocum is Btrictly an amateur and is a staunch 
supporter of his "Old Reliable" Parker. 

At the Ohio State tournament, Canton, O., D. A. 
Upson, shooting a Parker gun, won first general 
average for the three days, with 476 out of a possible 
500. F. H Snow shooting a Parker gun also, was 
second with 474 out of 500. Frank D. Alkire made 
the longest continuous run during the tournament "of 
ton days with high amateur average for the third 
day, losing 8 only out of 235. R. R. Rhoades with a 
Parker gun won high amateur ayerage the second 
day, losing only 5 birds out of 160. 

The "Old Reliable" Parker was much in evidence, 
and such records as above prove absolutely that the 
Parker is the winner of the age. 



Trout fishing is still reported to be good in the 
Santa Clara valley and contiguous Coast streams. 

Al M. Cummings at last accounts was at Webber 
lake and having great sport with the trout. 

Independence and Tahoe lakee are both inviting 
now to the angler, the fishing is first-class. 



TRADE NOTES. 



AVERAOEB REPORTED. 

Rochester. Ind., June 1 3t and 2d, W. R. Crosby, 
fir9t general average, 384 out of 400, shooting "New 
E. C." (Improved). R. O. Heikes, second general 
average, 371 out of 400, shooting "Du Pont." W. D. 
Stannard, third general average, 370 out of 400,shoot- 
ing"DuPont." H. M. Clark of Wabash, Ind., 362 
out of 400, "Du Pont." 

Chicago, 111 , June 3d and 4th, W. D. Stannard, 
first general average, 359 out of 380, shooting "Du 
Pont." F. C. Riehl, second general average, 356 out 
of 380, shooting "New E. C." (Improved). 

Sioux City, la., June 6th, 7th and 8th, Fred Gilbert, 
first general average, 579 out of 600, shooting 
'DuPont." Frank Riehl, second general average, 
556 out of 600, shooting "New E. C." (Improved). R. 
Barber, first amateur and third general average, 551 
out of 600, shooting "DuPont " Russell Klein and F. 
Bills, shooting "DuPont," tied for second amateur 
average, 550 out of 600. 

Bozeman, Mont., June 9th, 10th and 11th, J. C. 
Drumgoole of Anaconda. Mont , first amateur and 
second general average, 245 out of 265, shooting "In- 
fallible." E. P. Confarr, of Livingston, Mont , secerd 
amateur and third general average, 244 out of 265, 
shootirg "Infallible." F. M. Bybe of Idaho Falls, 
Idaho, and R ynolds Fraser of Helena, Mont , tied for 
third amateur average, 242 out of 265, shooting "In- 
fallible." 

PETER8' POINTS. 

At New Berlin, Ohio, May 30th, first average was 
won by Mr. E F Haak, third by Mr. F. A. Smith, 
and fourth by Mr. D. D. Gross, all shooting Peters' 
factory loads. 

At Columbia, Pa., May 30th, Mr. Neaf Apgar broke 
99 out of 100 with Peters' Ideals. Accounts do not 
state why he missed that lone target. 

At Chicago, 111., June 3d, first professional average 



MERIT ALWAYS COllNTS. 

A. J. Webb shoots an L. C. Smith gun. Webb won 
high average at the recent Northwest Tournament at 
Portland, be also won the diamond individual cham- 
pionship, made ten straights in various events 

On July 2nd at the Ingleside grounds be won the 
Phil B. Bekeurt perpetual challenge trophy for the 
third time. 

HIGH HONORS AGAIN FOR U. M. O. 

At Ingleside, June 2nd, the regular monthly shoot 
of the Golden Gate Gun Club was held. Twenty- 
three shooters faced the traps. The chief event of 
the day's meeting was the conteet for the Bekeart 
Cup — a very pretty race and closely contested by 
Messrs. Webb, Feudner, E. Schultz, C. C. Nauman 
and C A. Haight. Mr. Webb winning out with 
90%. Without exception the shooters in this event 
used U. M. C. ammunition exclusively. It should 
appear unnecessary to further emphasize the value of 
the U. M. C. products, a simple statement of the con- 
tinued use by experts being sufficient, to prove the 
sterling qualities of accuracy and genuine popularity. 
Of the twenty-three contestants in the regular 
shoot, twenty were exclusive users of the U. M. C. 
ammunition. 

AN IMPORTANT BUSINESS CHANGE. 

The following circular letters received this week are 
self-explanatory and will be read with interest by 
many of our readers. 

Mr. Phil B. Bekeart, President of the Phil B. 
Bekeart Co. states: 

I beg to ad vise you that I have sold out my Tire 
Agencies and Tire Repair Shcps, both in this city and 
in Los Angeles, to The Fisk Rubber Co., who after 
July 1st, will conduct these branches for their own 
account. 

Injustice to myself and The Fisk Rubber Co., I 
deem it proper te state that I resigned from the Fisk 
Agency, for the following reason: 

I could not handle the increased business of the 
Fisk Rubber Co. and still de justice to my largely 
increased gun business. 

I intend in the future to confine myself to my gun 
and sporting goods business. Before ceasing our 
business relations, I take this opportunity of thanking 
you for past favors, and of bespeaking your continued 
interest in the future, for The Fisk Rubber Co. and 
the Firestone Tire & Rubber Co. 

The Fisk Rubber Co. announces through Mr. G. E. 
Johnson, Pacific Coast Manager: We beg to advise 
you that on July 1st, we will open a branch in this 
city, temporarily located at 146 Second St., second 
floor, pending the completion of a building now being 
erected for us at 409 Golden Gate wvenue, where we 
will handle our own account on the Pacific Coast. 

This change has been. brought about at request of 
the P. B. Bekeart Co., who formerly handled our 
account in this territory, for reasons with which you 
are already familiar, through notice from them. We 
wish to thank you fer past favors given us through 
the Bekeart Co., and can assure you that with our 
policy to make the best goods possible, regardless of 
cost, and with building constructfd for our ute we 
can give you both goods and service, of which there 
will be no cause for complaint. 

The Phil B. Bekeart Company conducts the Coast 
Branch of the Ithaoa Gun Company. 



I 



July 8, 1905J 



<2D*te gvcetiev cms gpovteman 



11 




THE FARM 



The Babcock Test. 




One hundred pounds of milk consists 
of approximately eighty rive to eighty 
six pounds of water and fourteen to fi fteen 
pounds of solids of which in round 
numbers nearly one-third is butter fat. 
The Babcock test is simply a chemical 
means of measuring what proportion of 
milk is fat. A fair sample is measured 
into a bottle and an equal amount of sul- 
phuric acid breaks up the solids not fat, 
leaving the fat to raise into the neck of 
the test bottle by means of centrifugal 
force developed in the tester. 

In the process of churning the fat is 
collected together during which more or 
less water is imprisoned in it, also a little 
curd : the salt is added to it in the pro- 
cess of working so that butter contains 
something in addition to pure fat. A 
given quantity of fat will therefore make 
more butter than the actual pounds of 
fat. This mount of butter made more 
than the fat is commonly spoken of as 
over-run and will vary from ten to fifteen 
per 100 pounds fat in ordinary creamery 
It might through carelessness be entirely 
lost so that the churned butter would not 
be greater than the amount of fat in 
the milk delivered. Again under varying 
conditions which are not as thoroughly 
understood as is desired, it may run more 
than fifteen pounds. 

The question to whom this over-run 
belongs is one that is often raised. I 
believe that the simplest method of ac 
counting is about as follows: Supposing 
for instance the milk tested four and four- 
tenths. It would therefore contain four 
and four-tenths per cent butter fat. 1000 
pounds of this milk would bring to the 
creamery 440 pounds fat. If this made 
up into butter produces 506 pounds of 
butter there would be 'fifteen per cent 
over-run. Supposing this 506 pounds of 
butter to be sold when butter was worth 
twenty-eight cents a pound the creamery 
would receive $141.68. From this the 
creamery must pay its running expenses 
and pay for the fat. This mry be done in 
either of two ways. The actual expense 
may be deducted from the total receipts 
and the balance divided among the 
patrons on the basis of fat delivered, or if 
the creamery either a private or stock com- 
pany, agrees to make the butter for fixed 
price per pound, from tnree and one-balf 
to four and one-half being a common 
charge, for the saKe of illustration we will 
deduct four cents a pound for making. 
This on 506 pounds of butter would amount 
to $20.24, leaving $121.44 to be divided 
among the patrons Since this is the 
amount that 440 pounds of fat is worth, 
one pound of fat would be worth 1,140th 
or 27}£c. Each patron should therefore 
receive 27>£c a pound for each pound of 
fat delivered by him. 

In the case of a stock company, should 
the amount deducted at four cents a 
pound for making be more than enough 
to pay freight, commission, labor, fuel, 
repairs, etc., the balance may be held 
against a time when new equipment is 
needed or it may be apportioned among 
the stockholders as a dividend on the 
money they have invested. It is fair in 
either case since the patrons have received 
all the proceeds of the sale of their 
product less the four cents which the 
creamery was to get for making, and they 
get this whether the over-run be large or 
small. 

It is to the interest of the creamery to 
have as large an over-run as possible. 
The more pounds of butter there are sold 
the larger the receipts for making. On 
the other band there is no encouragement 
for them to either to raise or lower the 
test because their receipts are not in- 
fluenced by the results of the test, as the 
pounds of butter made depend on the 



pounds of fat actually delivered not on 
what the test, shows. 

With the present prices a good four- 
bottled tester is within the reach of any 
farmer who is milking four or five cows. 
He should have one not only to know 
whether or not the test is being cor 
rectly made at the creamery, but to 
know what his individual cows are do- 
ing. The difference In the cost of keep- 
ing different cows in a herd will as a rule 
not vary over $10 on an ordinary farm, 
while the returns per cow will vary as 
much as $3 or $40 between the best and 
poorest. It is not an uncommon experi- 
ence to find one cow not even paying for 
the feed she eats, to say nothing of hav- 
ing a margin for interest and deprecia- 
tion. This is a matter that needs 
attention. 

A man who keeps five or six cows as a 
sideline can no more afford to keep an 
unprofitable cow than he who Is keeping 
twenty as an important part of his busi- 
ness. — II. E. Van Norman, Indiana Ex- 
periment Station. 

American Bacon Hogs. 



Our bacon hog differs considerably from 
the English bacon hog. There is. how- 
ever, a growing tendency toward the 
tpyical bacon type The indications 
point to the fact that we are at the 
"parting of the way," and that in the 
future, we will have a place for the ideal 
bacon hog as well as for the fat or lard 
hog. 

Corn is at present being used for other 
purposes, such as the manufacture of 
corn starch, whisky, and oil. The latter 
is used for various purposes, as for lu- 
bricating, a table oil, as a substitute for 
olive oil, linseed oil, etc. This has caused 
the price of corn to go up to nearly what 
other grains, used as hog feeds, are worth. 
At the same time, a ration of all corn, 
which usually forms the principal part of 
the feed of the fat or lard hog, is coming 
to be generally recognized as detrimental 
to the best development of swine from 
the breeder's standpoint These things 
are the cause of a gradual drifting toward 
a more mixed ration in swine feeding, 
and usually a ration containing more 
protein or flesh forming material. Coupled 
with this, there is not so great a demand 
for fat pork as there formerly was, and 
shipping and cold storage facilities are 
much better, consequently more fresh 
and lean meats are used. 

These various factors are gradually, 
but most surely effecting a change in 
the character of swine in the United 
States. The all fat hog of the past will 
in the future be partly replaced by the 
bacon hog, and the fat or lard hog as 
a whole will in the future more nearly 
approach the bacon hog in form than 
in the past. Of course, there will always 
be a demand for lard, consequently 
there will always be a place for the fat 
or lard hog. But the bacon hog will 
occupy a more prominent position in the 
future than he has in the past. 

There is a demand from foreign coun- 
tries and more largely from our own 
country, for bacon, and there being few 
bacon hogs to supply the demand, the 
trade is supplied from the lighter hogs 
of the fat or lard hog type. This bacon 
however, does not command so high a 
price on the market as does bacon from 
typical bacon hogs. The bacon hogs 
under consideration here weigh from 
155 to 195 pounds, and range in age from 
six to eight months. They are simply 
hogs selected from the light hogs in 
general, that conform as nearly as pos- 
sible to the bacon type. They are not 
very fat, have fairly good development 
of muscle, or lean meat, and are as long 
and deep inside as is possible to obtain 
them. About 20 per cent of the light 
hogs that come to the Chicago market 
are of this type. 

Choice bacon hogs are the best of 
this class; they are hogs that show good 
length and depth, good quality and are 
smooth, well developed, and not very 



fat. They are hogs that have had con- 
siderable exercise and have not been 
fed on an exclusive corn ration. These 
bacon hogs are selected for the most 
part from shipments that come from 
outside of the corn belt, where the prin- 
cipal feed is similar to that used in 
Great Britain, Denmark and Canada for 
bacon production, viz., oats, barley, rye, 
peas, skim milk and pasture. 

These are the feeds that are conducive 
to the production of the best bacon 
when fed to hogs of the bacon type, and 
when fed to hogs of the fat, or lard hog 
type bacon hogs such as we have under 
discussion here are produced. These 
bacon hogs have more fat on the out- 
side and lees leaa meat on the inside of 
their carcasses than the typical bacon 
hogs, but are better in these respects 
than the typical fat, or lard hogs. In 
truth, this bacon hog is an intermediary 
between the fat or lard hog and the 
typical bacon hog, being more like the 
former than the latter. 

The good bacon hogs of this class may 
be of poorer quality, may be lower in 
condition or may be too fat or too much 
of the fat hog type. Any one or all of 
these conditions would be the cause of 
hogs grading lower than choice. 

If there is a still more marked defi- 
ciency in these characteristics, the hog 
will grade as a common bacon hog. But 
this hog has sufficient quality and con- 
dition to show that he has been well fed 
and has been fed so that his side9 will 
do to cure for the cheaper grades of 
bacon. — William Deitrich. 



Dairy Notes. 



By keeping the cows clean there will 
be little danger of stringy milk. 

The cow that tests below 3 per cent 
butter fat is not worth keeping in the 
dairy herd. 

The more study the dairyman puts 
into hie occupation the more success will 
he attain. 

Keep things about the farm dairy clean. 
Elbow grease costs effort but it's worth 
the candle when it comes to clean milk, 
clean separators, clean butter and and a 
clean trade 

The enormous sales of cream separators 
show the value of the separator on the 
farm. The warm skim milk for feeding 
purposes soon pays for the cost of a 
machine. 

Sorghum planted this month in rows 
and cultivated like corn, then shredded 
for winter cow feed makes a good milk 
producing food in the winter time. 

To make profits with dairy butter, have 
the cream ripened properly, churn at the 
rigut temperature, wash the granulated 
butter until the butter milk is removed, 
work the butter just enough, salt with 
judgment and pack neatly. 

The dairy cow and the hog make an 
excellent combination. Not only do they 
pay well but they take little fertility from 
the farm. Let us have more '"cow-hog" 
combines and then we will hear of less 
farmer farm-separations. 

Where calves are "brought up by 
hand," so to speak, the rule to stay by 
first, last and all the time is : Keep every- 
thing clean and sweet, feed regularly and 
carefully, and use kindness above all. 

If you are feeding skim milk to calves, 
don't make the mistake of feeding a 
larger quantity than you would feed if 
whole milk were given them. This is a 
mistake that so many make, and the re- 
sult is that their calves are troubled with 
scours. 

The dust and air of most cow stables is 
loaded with bacteria, and when they get 
into the milk they multiply at the rate of 
millions per minute. The milker's duty 
to his family and to humanity in general 
when he is milking is a serious matter. 

Is the air in the stable pure and free 
from dust during milking? Would he 
be willing and glad to get a plate of soup 
while he is milking a cow? If not, why 
not? Isn't milk a human food, and isn't 
the milk pail that is under the cow being 



filled with food for his table? 

After cleaning out the cow stable at 
least twice each year, sprinkle plaster 
over the floor to aid in absorbing the 
liquid and in preserving the wooden 
floors. Cement floors do not need plaster 
as they may be flushed with water from a 
hose. Cement mangers and iron stalls 
are now put into cow stables and are 
proving very satisfactory. 



Dehorning of Cattle. 

Professor Spellman of the Agricultural 
Department, declares it is possible to de- 
horn a whole breed of catt'e by introduc- 
ing into the breed a single pure polled 
animal, though this would require more 
inbreeding than is desirable. The problem 
is much easier when a number of breeders 
work in parallel lines, so that strains are 
always available that are not closely re- 
lated. The only difficulty in applying 
the principles of Mendel's law in dehorn- 
ing a breed of cattle arise from the fact 
that the hybrid animal is itself polled, 
although it is capable of transmitting 
both the polled character and the horned 
character to its offspring. 

The general principle to be used as a 
working basis is the important fact that 
when a number of crosses are secured 
between polled and horned animals and 
these crosses themselves are crossed, one- 
fourth of the progeny will be pure polled 
animals incapable of transmitting horns 
to their progeny, and these pure polled 
animals are to be used as a basis upon 
which to build a polled breed. 

It is entirely practicable for every 
breeder to 6ecure enough of these pure 
polled animals as a basis on which 
gradually to work out the horned animals 
and increase the pure poll until they con- 
stitute his entire herd. 



Raising Calves by Hand. 

Improvements in stock and methods 
of feeding young calves have resulted in 
new ideas in regard to raising calves by 
hand. Every one who has tried it has 
experienced difficulty in keeping them 
thrifty and in securing reasonable growth. 
It is quite possible by observing the little 
necessary things to raise calves just as 
well by hand as in the natural way. 
Cleanliness about all utensils and care in 
feeding the milk warm, with judgment as 
to quantity, seems to cover the ground. 

It is possible to raise calves profitably 
on warm separator milk bv substituting 
whole oats for the cream removed. One 
of the advantages in hand raiting is that 
after the calf is grown sufficiently to go on 
dry feed it does better than a calf raised 
by the cow. Early maturity no doubt is 
hindered by hand feeding, but it is made 
up fully or nearly so by educating the 
calf to hustle for itself to a certain extent. 
A few years ago the idea of making baby 
beef out of hand fed calves was considered 
absurd, but in the past two years this 
has come to be an established custom in 
certain dairy sections. Holstein calves 
are fed by hand and turned off as profit- 
able baby beef at the age of from sixteen 
to twenty months, and they have been 
made to gain an average of 1% pounds 
per day, figuring from birth. 



Daedalion 2:10 For Sale. 

Can Beat His Record Three Times 
in a Race. 

I- entered at Fresno mid ready to start. 
A high class Race Home and a Coming Sire. 

Sire, DIABLO 2:09 1-4. 

Dam GRACE (dam of Daedalion 

2:10, Creole 2:15, Eagle 2:19J, etc.) 

by Buccaneer. 

Owner's business will not permit him to devote 
any time to racing. For further particular-, 
address 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN. 



FINE ROADSTER FOR SALE. 

/ 'HESTNUT GELDING, FIVE YEARS OLD* 
16 hands, well broken to harness and also to 
■addle. Has trotted quarters In 37 seconds. Is 
not afraid of automobiles and Is a fine lady's 
horse. His sire Is Nutwood Wilkes and his dam 
by Eros. For price and other particulars address 
J. TWOHIG, Irvlngton, Cal. 



12 



LJoly 8, 1005 



Treatment of Colic in Horses. 

Colic la the name given to abdomi- 
nal pains, no matter from what 
cause. There is probably no disease, 
aside from the strictly contagious diseases, 
which causes so great a financial loss to 
etoci owners as does colic, writes Dr. 
Barnes of the Kansas agricultural college. 

Then are a great many causes of colic, 
but improper food and water are the 
main ones. Good food and water given 
either at irregular times or in too large 
quantities may cause colic. Highly con- 
centrated foods, such as peas, beans, corn, 
etc., which are difficult to digest, are also 
fruitful causes of colic. 

There is generally more of this disease 
in the spring when there is an extra 
amount of work to be done, and the 
horses are given large feeds of grain to 
which they are not accustomed. In 
these cases more work is done by the 
animal system and the body also has 
additional work thrown upon it in using 
this unnecessary food. The stomach and 
intestines are the organs most easily 
deranged in colic. 

Irregular feediog will bring on this 
disease. The animals go too long a time 
before eating, and then when allowed to 
eat, gorge themselves. The stomach be- 
ing in an exhausted condition cannot 
take care of this enormous amount of 
food. 

Other causes of colic may be mentioned, 
feeding an animal first and then watering 
him, causing the grain to be carried undi- 
gested into the intestines before it is 
ready for the action of intestinal fluids; 
sudden changes in the grain; feeding 
while the animal is exhausted ; new grain 
or hay, also sour food ; sucking wind into 
the stomach, eating stones, sand or sandy 
food; constipation; worm in the intes- 
tines; inflammation of the intestines, 
kidneys or lining of the abdomen ; rupture 
of navel or scrotum ; eating irritants, as 
chemicals, and lead poisoning. 

The first symptoms of colic observed in 
a horse is pain expressed by restlessness, 
pawing, kicking the belly with the hind 
leg, switching the tail, looking at the 
flanks, rolling and throwing himself 
violently down and then jumping up again 
lying on the back, reiusing food, straining 
to pass water and manure. 

If the colic is caused by fermenting 
foods, the animal will bloat. The tem- 
perature and respiration are about normal 
but in spasmodic colic respiration is 
hurried during the spasm. 

Food and water should not be given a 
horse at meal time until he is cool. He 
should not be allowed to stand in a draft 
after he has been overheated. Unless the 
weather is warm, a woolen blanket ought 
t)be placed over the animal to absorb 
the sweat. After he is cool give him 
water, next a feed of hay, and lastly the 
grain. 

A horseshould not be allowed to remain 
in tht k table several days without exercise 
and receive the same amount of food as 
when working. New grain must be fed 
sparingly at first to avoid indigestion. 

During hot weather the water should 
be run into a tub and warmed by the heat 
of the sun before the horse drinks it at 
the noun hour or at night. 

Always water horses before and not 
after feeding. A point to be emphasized 
is regular feeding and not abrupt changes 
in the nature of the feed. Horses should 
not be put to active work immediately 
after a meal. 

In treating for colic first of all put the 
patient in a large stall with plenty of 
• traw if a Btall is not available, put him 
"in a yard which can be well bedded. A 
colic patient.ehould have some competent 
person to attend him constantly. If the 
weather is cold, blanket him. Just as 
soon as possible give a medium sized 
horse a quart of raw linseed oil. Then if 
the animal has cramp colic (spasmodic 
colic) give one-half ounce chloral hydrate 
in a pint of water. In an hour give 
another dose of chloral if the animal con- 
tinues to show pain. An hour later give 



two drachms fluid extract Cannabis 
Indica, one-half drachm fluid extract 
Belladonna in a half pint of water, even 
though the patient may seem easier. If 
the horse becomes violent again it may 
be necessary io resort to the chloral in 
half ounce doses. 

In buying the chloral it Is well to have 
the druggist put it up in half ounce 
packages. Be sure to give the oil first, as 
the object in all kinds of colic is to get 
rid of the substance causing the trouble. 
If the horse has wind colic, alter giving 
the oil, then give one-half drachm fluid 
extract belladonna, one ounce turpentine 
and a half drachm of fluid extract of nux 
vomica in a pint of milk. Walk the horse 
around and aid him to pass wind by 
rubbing the belly with wisps of hay or 
straw. If gas accumulates to such an 
extent that it is necessary to puncture 
the intestines, use a trocar and canula. 
This instrument is boiled for five minutes 
or more and when cool is introduced into 
the intestines on the right side of the 
horse in the center of the triangle formed 
by the hip bone, last rib and the bones 
running at right angles at the back bone. 



Summer Care or the Milch Cow. 



A point in the summer care of the 
milch cow that is of vital importance and 
which is very frequently overlooked is 
that of keeping her up to her normal flow 
of milk. It is an oft-proved fact that the 
cow which is allowed to shrink for want 
of sufficient feed or protection from heat 
and flies cannot be brought back to her 
normal flow when these adverse con- 
ditions are passed and good feed and 
favorable conditions are again supplied, 
writes Prof. Van Norman in Orange Judd 
Farmer. If she is allowed to shrink four 
or five pounds per day for days or weeks 
at a time, good feed may increase this a 
pound or two, but it will not bring it 
trek to the former mark. 

This fact emphasizes the importance of 
something to supplement the scant pas- 
ture in the summer time. It will pav to 
plant a little early sweet corn, to be fol- 
lowed by the regular field corn. Often 
where there is plenty of silo capacity, 
there will be silage left from the winter 
faeding. This, if left undisturbed, will 
mold on the surface, but when pasture 
gets short this bad layer can be thrown 
off and the silage is ready for use. It is 
important at this season of the year that 
at least two inches be removed every day, 
as the warm weather causes a very rapid 
fermentation and sour silage is not a 
desirable food. 

If it is possible to provide a dark shed, 
where the cows may go in the middle of 
the day and avoid the sun and flies, it is 
a most profitable provision. Most dairy- 
men find it desirable to continue the 
grain ration throughout the summer, re 
ducing the quantity when the grass is 
flush and lessening the proportion of corn 
and other heating feeds. 

Most cow owners have something on 
the farm which they can feed to supple- 
ment pasture. The important thing is to 
do it. Do not allow the cows to shrink, 
as a shrinkage of two or three pounds a 
day is not merely a loss for the time 
being, but is very much less throughout 
the remainder of the season. Make your 
plans now to prevent this loss. Have a 
patch of corn where it is the least trouble 
to get it to the cows. Everyone can at 
least do this. 



Capons May Be Easily Grown. 

No one is better situated to raise capons 
than the farmer. On the average farm 
the additional work required to raise from 
100 to 200 capons would not be noticed, 
and most of this work can be attended to 
in the winter when time is plentiful with 
the farmer. 

In the neighborhood of Fairbury, 111., a 
great many capons are raised every year, 
and are found to be very profitable. There 
are many stories told about the sizes to 
which capons grow, while the truth is 
that the ordinary capon will grow to but 
one or two pounds more than theordinary 
uncaponized cockerel would in the same 
time, and to secure this additional weight 
extra feeding is necessary. 

In preparation for capon raising it is 
wise to hatch about twice the number of 
chickens as capon desired, for fully half 
are likely to be pullets. The pullets may 
be kept for egg production or may be sold 
for spring chickens, thus securing enough 
money to pay for the raising of the whole 
flock up to the time the cockerels are old 
to caponize — which is about twelve weeks. 

The operation of caponizing does not 
require much skill, though the beginner 
will pr bably kill two or three at the 
start, which will not be lost, for they 
bleed to death in about the same time as 
if their throats had been cut, and are 
exactly as good for table purposes as if 
bled in the latter way. A set of tools for 
caponizing costs from $1.50 to $2, and with 
each set is sent directions that anyone 
can follow. 

After the caponizing the cockerels be- 
come quiet and docile, and when fed they 
eat their fill and sit quietly around until 
feeding time again. Capons always retain 
that sweetness and juciness of flesh 
that is characteristic of the spring chicken 
the reason why they bring such high 
prices. They are fed much as other fowls 
would be, only eating more. About all 
they eat goes to the formation of juicy, 
palatable flesh. They are ready to sell 
February 1st, and the demand for them 
keepB up as long as they can be bought. 

A few years ago cipons commanded 
hardly any attention in the west, and 
do not yet bring the prices they do in the 
Eastern cities. A8 the average Plymouth 
Rock capon will weigh seven or eight 
pounds, it will beseen that the capon sells 
for from 40 to 60 cents more than the 
chicken of the same age, and the differ 
ence in the cost of raising is insignificant 
— Exchange. 

Hens Need Lime. 



Finish for the Block. 



No one is so well situated to raise 
thoroughbred fowls as the farmer. Plenty 
of room, plenty of fresh air, plenty of 
green stuff in summer and clover and 
waste vegetables in winter, are advantages 
he has over half the fanciers. He can 
raise his fowls cheaper, keep them cheaper 
and they will be larger, hardier and more 
vigorous than those of the breeder who 
must keep both his old and young stock 
in contracted quarters the year around. 
o 

Sponges. S. Adderley, 307 Market St 



Hens that get so crazy for egg shells 
usually have been improperly fed and 
they crave lime. 

Hens in their natural state produce 
very few eggs and require little lime for 
the manufacture of shells. By careful 
breeding, conditions have been arbitrarily 
changed until a good hen will now pro- 
duce six times her own weight in eggs 
during the year. It takes considerable 
lime to make shells for so many eggs and 
unless this is provided for, the hens 
acquire an abnormal appetite and will 
eat egg shells or anything else that will 
satisfy them. 

Hens that have once acquired the habit 
are difficult to handle afterwards because 
they never forget. Unless hens are extra 
valuable probably the easiest way out of 
it is to take their heads off ; then be care- 
ful about feeding the pullets that are 
coming on to take their places. 



By proper finish in an animal of any 
kind we mean that the muscles of it have 
been properly and extensively enough 
expanded to warrant good returns when 
cooked. If the animal is only "warmed 
up" with feed, but not finished, we are 
likely to find the cells of the muscles very 
flaccid, and when cooked results will 
show a decided loss due to the evapora- 
tion of water, says Kimball's Dairy 
Farmer. If, however, the animal is over- 
fattened another condition presents itself. 
The cells now are expanded, and among 
them are laid large flakes of fat. So ex- 
tensive are these that in cooking a great 
loss here also occurs This loss is not due 
to that of water, but of oil. The meat 
from such a piece, in addition to being 
extremely rich, producing nauseating 
affects in some cases when eaten often, 
tends to become stringy. 

The hog when properly finished 1b 
firmer than before or after that point has 
been reached. To tell just when it is 
attained requires some experience, but it 
can be done wfth great skill after a little 
training. A great many buyers are not 
discriminating against improperly fin- 
ished hogs, so much as one might expect, 
but a nickel to fifteen cents per hundred 
weight is not unusual. If we were to 
make cuts in prices such as we are war- 
ranted in making after having observed 
the results of the cooking test, they would, 
in all probability, be much heavier than 
those indicated above by two or three 
times. 

The time is fast approaching when 
finish will cut as much figure as quality; 
in fact, part of the discriminations that 
are now laid against quality are in reality 
laid against finish. The time to learn is 
before the war has begun. A more 
opportune time than now cannot be 
found. 

We shall soon have the cement silo as 
a common thing on western farms. The 
cement floor for barns and stables is al- 
ready here, aud is now being used at a 
lesser cost than floors made of plank, 
while infinitely more durable. The 
cement water tank is also coming to the 
front as every way better than the old 
wooden stave tank. We hear of quite a 
measure of success being attained in the 
use of the large sized draintile, while the 
cement road culvert is unquestionably 
the best and cheapest type of culvert to 
construct. The manifold uses to which 
cement may be put on the farm invite 
the attention of the progressive farmer. 

o 

In feeding for butter it makes a great 
deal of difference what kind of a cow the 
feed is given to. If it is given to a cow of 
beef type, the butter costs about twice as 
much as if given to a cow of dairy type. 
The difference is in the cow rather than 
in the feed or the milker or the churn. 



Contrary to general impression, the 
fewer eggs a hen lays, the more are they 
likely to be infertile, if we can judge 
anything from experiments earned on at 
the Maine station. There an attempt 
was made to breed downward in egg 
yield as well as upward. The experi- 
menters were surprised at finding an un- 
looked for obstacle namely, the infertility 
of the eggs from hens producing the 
fewest. 

o 

Sober up on Jackson's Napa Soda. 



Warranted to Give Satisfaction. 

Gombault's 

Caustic Balsam 




Has Imitators But No Competitors. 

A Safe, Speedy and Positive Cure for 
Curb, Splint. Sweeny, Capped Hock, 
Strained Tendons, Founder, Wind 
Puffs, and all lameness from Spavin, 
Ringbone and other bony tumor*. 
Cures all skin diseasos or Parasites, 
Thrush, Diphtheri-. Removes all 
Bunches from Horses or Cattle. 
As a Human Remedy for Rheumatism, 
I 8prains, Sore Throat, etc. It ts invaluable. 
I Every boitle of Caustic Balsam sold Is 
Warranted to (rive satisfaction. Price $1 50 
per bottle. Sold by dniKlflste, or sent bj ex. 
pres.*. charges paid, wltn full directions for 
I Its use. tirsend for descripUre circulars, 
I testimonials, etc. Address ) « 

•The Lawrence-Williams Co., Cleveland, 



July 8, 1905] 



13 



Time to Market Swine. 



It requires nice judgment to determine 
when pigs have reached the profitable 
limit. The original cost of pigs, their 
rate of development and the cost of feed 
all have to be taken into consideration. 
Sometimes it is better to sell pigs at six 
months of age, at other times the increase 
in weight is profitable up to nine or ten 
months. As the age increases additional 
weight is made at an increased coat and 
this increase is proportionate to the age of 
the pig. The greatest gain in proportion 
to cost is made during the first four or 
five weeks of the pig's life, as the pigs are 
at that time supported almost entirely by 
the sow. Generally speaking when other 
pigs are coming on to take their place it 
is better to dispose of the porkers at about 
eight months. The cost is greater each 
month whether the growth of the pig is 
rapid or slow. 



Deposit Your 
Idle Funds 



Our South American agricultural 
neighbors are learning the value of for- 
eign markets and availing themselves of 
them more and more each year. Argen- 
tine is breeding up her cattle to a stand- 
ard that threatens more dangerous com- 
petition to our own in foreign markets 
and great quantities of butter are now 
shipped to England from the fertile plains 
of Uruguay. 

It has been known that a good cow has 
become a mediocre, because of a change 
of masters and milkers. One loved the 
cow and the work, the other had no taste 
for either. The cow felt the difference 
and would not respond. 



The 
Modern 

Business Necessity 

The 



IE LOCKE ADDER 



* CAPACITY 999.999.99* 

CntliiisiaMically endorsed the 



Calculating Ma 
world over. Rapid, accurate, simple, aurame. i wo moucis 
Idized copper finish. $5 no. oxidised siUer finish. $1(1 00. prepa 
U. S. Write for Fret Booklet an. I SpecUl Offer. Agents want* 

C. E. Locke Mfg. Co. 105 Walnut St., Kensett. Iowa J 



COMPRESSED PURE SALT BRICKS 
PATENT FEEDERS 

Handy. No Waste. No Neglect. 

<0g^^ 5« a month. 

iRefined Dair>5alt tells. 

IIS*! ASK YOUR DEALER. 

mml well send book free. 
H»JBELMONT STABLE SUPPLY CO 

*^|^^ PATENTEES MANUFACTURERS- 

BROO KLVN, N .V. 



A GOOD FILLY FOR SALE. 

HANDSOME TWO-YEAR-OLD FILLY BY 
Locbtnvar 2:20, he by Director H. 2:27 by 
Director 2:17: first dam Myrtle by Sterling 6223; 
second dam Theresa by Prompter; third dam 
Empress by Flaxtall; fourth dam Lady Narley 
by Marion, son of Mambrlno Chief 11. This filly 
Is well broken, perfectly sound, good gal ted and 
a first-class prospect. For further particulars 
address J. D. BLAMEY, 

Box 715, Grass Valley. Cal. 



LIVERY FOR SALE. 

ANB OF THE FINEST STABLES IN THE 
*J State. Has been established for years and Is 
doing a good paying livery aud boarding stable 
business. Located in one of the most prosperous 
cities In California. A first ol ass proposition in 
■very respect. Thorough Investigation before 
purchasing solicited. Will be sold for 75% of Its 
value Exoellent reason for selling. For further 
particulars oall or address "Livery," Breeder 
awd Spobtsm^, San Francisco. Cal. 



PARK HORSE FOR SALE, 

HIGH-CLASS ROADSTER, COAL BLACK, 
15V4 hands, five years old, weighs 1000 pounds. 
Is a very handsome horse, a perfect beauty: fear- 
less of all things on the road: has been driven by 
a lady. Has lots of speed, but never trained on a 
track. Sound and all right. Sire and dam both 
nfbUM. Appgto 0M( . SBYt Njpt Cjl 



Photo Engraving Company 

HIGH CLASS A KT 

IN 

Half Tones and Line Engraving 

Artiatlo Designing. 
506 Mission St., co*. First, San Francisco 



WITH THE 



Central Trust Company 
of California 

42 MontsromerylSt, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



PHENOL SODIQUE 



lioals 



You can open a Savings Account 
by mail with any sum 
large or small. 

INTEREST PAID SEMI-ANNUALLY 

3 1-4% on Ordinary Savings 
3 6-10% on Term Savings 

Send for Booklet, 
•'THE SURE WAY TO WEALTH." 




OUTS, BURNS 
and SORES. 

THE BEST 
Antiseptic 

Dressing 

for 

Man or Beast. 



Keep handy for emer- 
gencies In home 
and stable. 

Equally good for dogs 
and all animals. 

If not at your drug- 
gists, small size sent 
to any address upon 
reoelpt of 10c. 



Mark Levy & Co. 



MARK l.m 
1:\p«rt Cutler' 
and I ii(«r... 
V-int Suits 
Iroin . V 
>2.vOU up - 





39 Geary St.. S. F. Rooms 10-20 



Only llw 
t;,--i Help 
tmployed... 
All v*ork 
done on the 
premises 



Phont Grant 158 



672-680 11th Ave. 
Back of The Chutes. 



All kinds of Horses 
bought and sold 



THE ZIBBELL STABLE 

Z1BBELL & SON, Proprietors. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Boarding, Training and flfcudling all kinds of 
Fancy Horses. A few Nice Rigs on hand. Take 
any car going to the Chutes. Tel.: West 259. 



HANGE BROTHERS & WHITE 

Pharmaceutical Chemist* 
PHILADELPHIA CHICAGO 



CALIFORNIA 

NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY 

Through Picturesque California. 

The Ideal Route for 

Tie Aogler anfl Ontins Trips 

One day's ride from San Francisoo will take 
you to some of the finest Trout Streams in tin; 
State. Along the line and within easy distance 
are many of the best Springs and Summer Resorts 
in the State. The Company maintains a Fish 
Hatchery and annually stooks the many streams 
reaohed by Its road. One million Trout Fry were 
planted last year In these streams. 

Black Bass Fishing can be enjoyed in Russian 
River near Querneville, Guernewood Park and 
Camp Vacation, in season. 

The best Striped Bass Fishing waters on the 
Coast reached by the Tiburon Ferry. 

VACATION FOR 1905 

Issued annualb by the Company, is now ready. 
This is the standard publication on the Coast for 
information regarding Mineral Springs, Resorts, 
Country Homes and Farms where summer board- 
ers are taken, and Solect Camping Spots. 

Beautifully Illustrated, 150 pp. and can be had 
In response to mail request or at ticket offices. 

Ticket Offices— 650 Market Street (Chronlole 
Bldg) and Tiburon Ferry, foot of Market Street. 

General Office— Mutual Life Ins Bldg., cor. 
Sansome and California Sts., San Francisco. 

«TA8. L. FRAZIER, R. X. RYAN, 

Gen. Mgr. Gen. Pass. Agt. 



Absorbine 

Cures Strained Tuffy Ankles, 
Lymphangitis, Bruises and 
Swellings, Lameness and 
Allays Pain Quickly 
without Blistering, removing the 
hair, or laying the horse up. $2.(10 
per bottle, delivered, with full 
directions. Book 9-B free. 

ABSORBINE, JR., for mankind, 
$1.00 Bottle. Cures Strains, 
Gout, Varicose Veins, Etc. Mfd. only by 
W. F. YOCNG, P. D. F. , 
54 Monmouth Street. Springfield, Mass. 

For sale by Mack* Co . Langiey &MlchaelsCo. 
aldington & Co., J. O'Kane and J. A. McKerron, 
all of San Francisco. 




TRAINING AND BOARDING STABLES 

DEVISADERO AND FULTON STREETS. 

(1308 Fulton Street) 

Business Horses For Hire. 

I have opened a new Boarding and Training 
Stable near the above oorner, and will board and 
train for racing, road use or matinee driving a 
limited number of first-class horses at reasonable 
rates. Have good location, brand-new stable and 
everything first-class. All horses In my care will 
receive the best of attention. 

T. C. CABNEY 

Telephone: Page 4147. 




Cut=Undcr Truck 



This Truck is the result of years of endeavor to produce a wagon that has great 
carrying capaolty, ample strength without superfluous weight, low 
enough to the ground to minimize the labor of loading. 
Can turn short among trees, and oan be used on 
the roads as well as on the farm. 
The "Jersey" is a pronounced success, not only for the transportation of fruit, 
but as a general purpose dray In villages and small oltles. 



16-18 DRUMM ST., 



SAN FRANCISCC 



Ross McMahon IS?* 

Truck, Wagon and Horse Covers, Camp Furniture, etc. 



GOOD WORK, PROMPT SERVICE, 
REASONABLE'. PRICKS. (Phone: Bush 858) 



35 MARKET ST„ SAN FRANCISCO 




Craft's Distemper Cure 



is sold on the principle that the Interests of those who use It are to be con- 
sidered first of all, beoause upon its merit rests its suooess or failure, if 
you are not satisfied with Its use take baok the empty bottle and got your 
money. Itoures distemper, coughs, pinkeye and all forms of germ diseases. 
Ask your dealer. Price 50c and $1 a bottle. "Veterinary Pointers," cur new 
book, free 

oermotcfc-ist. 1 3 3d st, Lafayette. Ind. 

D E. NEWELL, General Agent for Pacific Coast, 510 Mission St., San Francisco, Cal 



Wells Medicine Co. ° h 



HEALDS 



BUSINESS COLLEGE 
24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



The oldest, the largest, the most popular com- 
mercial school on the Pacific Coast. 20,000 gradu- 
ates; 80 teachers; 70 typewriters; over 800 students 
annually placed in positions. Send for oatalogue. 



E. P. HEALD, President. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

IMPROVED 

STALLION SERVICE BOOKS 

(POCKET SIZE) 

100 Pages. Price $1, postpaid. 

Most Complete Book 
of the kind published. 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN. 
36 Geary St.. San Francisco. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

/CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT AND TRUST 
^ Company, corner California and Montgomery 
Sts.— For the six months ending June 30 1905, 
dividends have been declared on the deposits in 
the savings department of this company, as fol- 
lows: On term deposits at the rate of 3 6-10 per 
oent per annum, and on ordinary deposits at the 
rate of 3^ per oent per annum, free of taxes, and 
payable on and after Saturday, July 1, 1905. 

J. DALZELL BROWN, Manager. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE 

«JAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION, 532 
° California St., cor. Webb.— For the half year 
ending with the 30th of June, 1905. a dltldend has 
been declared at the rate per annum of three and 
six-tenths (3.60) per cent on term deposits and 
three and fifteen one-hundredths (3. 15) per cent 
on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, payable on 
and after Saturday, July 1, 1905. 

LOVELLf WHITE, Cashier. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

rpHE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCI- 
1 ety. 526 California St.— For the half-year end- 
ing June 3(1, 1905, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of three and one-half (3'/i) per oent per 
annum on all deposits, free of taxes, payable on 
and after Saturday, July I, 1905. 

GEORGE TOURNY, Seoretary. 



Chronic Bronchitis and Catarrh of the Bladder 
Cured In 48 Honrs. 



CAPS ULES 



1 



Superior to Copaiba, "nhotn or Iniccaicai 



C0C0A1NUT OIL CAKE 

THE BEST FEED FOR 

STOCK. CHICKENS AND PIOS 

fOR 8ALB IN LOTS TO SUIT BY 

EL DORADO LINSEED OIL WORKS CP. 
808 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



14 



[July 8, 1906 




THE BAYWOOD STUD 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAL. 

(Property of John Parrott, Esq.) 

Imp. Hackney Stallion 

GREEN'S RUFUS 63 <«•» 

Will serve a limited number of Approved Mares, Season 1900 

FEE --- $75 

Reductions made, for two or^more mares. 

Manager, WALTER SEALI. 



Quiniti Oinrnwnt 

Will Make A Horse Over; 



will pvi t sound legs under him and 
will save him from the cheap haw ker and trader It is the 
standard cure for Spavins, Curbs, Splints. Wind puffs and all 
the various lumps and hunches of like kind. Keep it always on 
hand and you will be prepared when trouble comes. Leading 
horsemen everywhere know it and use it. 

Mr. H. H. Clark. Frcdonia. N. T., writes: "The bottle of 
Qulnn's Ointment purchased from you about two years ago 
removed a curb and thorouKhpln aud did it for good. My 
horse's leg is as smooth as ever." 

Price $1.00 per bottle. Sold by all druggists or sent by mail' 
Write for circulars, testimonials, etc. 

W.B. EDDY A COMPANY, WHITEHALL, M. Y. 



HIGHLAND 



(TRIAL 2:12) 

Bred at Highland Stock 
Farm, Dubuque, Iowa, 



H 



Expresso 29199 

half brother to 
Expressive (3) 2:12*4 



Will make the Season of 1905 to a BU »5fk° f appr ° Ved 

mares at the farm of Mr. C. W. Clark, 

SAN MATEO, CAI. 

Terms for the Season $ 25 

HIGHLAND is a grand looking young stallion, tt"°"J!|£!5S 
most fashionable and his immediate ancestors are P~^ t llJr^lm D^Mrt 
fast records. He is beautifully galted and has a pertea td i s post tlon. Does S£ 
pull or want to break at speed, and can be placed at will in ^ bunch of Worses. He 
is a high-class horse and has better than 2:10 speedy As h ill ito be bred to a 
owner's mares this year and specially prepared for a low record ^this fall.ms owner 
desires that he be bred to a few htgh-olass outside mares this season 

HIGHLAND is a coal blaok horse with one white hind ankle, stands 16 hands 
high and weighs olose to 1200 pounds. 

A few mares at $25 each will also be received to be bred to 

KINNEY WILKES 

champion. KINNEY WILKES is hardly broken yet, but has shown 2:30 speed 
this year with the view of racing him next season. 

For further particulars regarding above Stallions apply to or address 



.Alpha 2:23*4 

Dam of 
Aegon 2:18!^ (sire Aegon 
Star »:11><); Algy 2:193*; 
Aeolion 2:20. sire of 
Wedgenut 2:263£; Lady 
Aoacia, dam of Precursor 
2:20(4; Erst, dam of 
Waino 2:293£ 



Advertiser 2:15X.. 
Sire of 

Mithra 2:UM 

Adaria ...2:16k 

Ad bell 2:23 

World's cham- 
pion yearling 

Esther 

Dam of 

Expressive 

(3) 212'/. 

Express. ...2:21 
Kelly..... 2:27 
Aloantara 2:23. . . . 
Sire of 
Sir Alcantara.. . 

2:05 M 

Moth Miller 2:07 
Sufreet. . . .2:065* 

Jessie Pepper 

Dam of 

lone S:17*4 

Alpha 2:23*4 

3 produolng sons 
7 •' daughters 



Electioneer 
166 in 2:30 



Lmla Wilkes 
dam of 3 in list 



{Express 
(thor.) 
Colisseum 
(thor.) 

{Geo. Wilkes 2:22 
83 in 2:30 
Alma Mater 
dam of 8 in 2:30 

f Mamb Chief 11 
I sire of 6 in 2:30 

[pau.Sidi Hamet 



FOUR-YEAR-OLD BAY STALLION BY McKINNEY 

2:11*1, champion sire of the world; 
Dam, HAZEL WILKES 2:11*4 by Guy Wilkes 2:15**: 
second dam, Blanche (dam of 5 in the list) by 
Arthurton; third dam, Nancy by Gen. Taylor, 30-mile 
He is 15.2 hands and weighs about 1050 pounds. He will be worked 



W. A. CLARK jr., Owner. 
TED HAYES, Manager. 



D. W. DONNELLY. Agent, 

San Mateo, Cal. 



I McMURRAY ) 




And LOW PRICES. 

McMURRAY SULKIES 

and JOGGING CARTS 

STANDARD THE WORLD OVER. 

43" Address, for printed matter and prices 

W. J. RENNET 

531 Valencia St., San Francisco, Cal. 



I 



SAVE-THE-HORSE 



TRADE MARK 




"It works different from anything I ever saw." Every user remarks 
this fact: 

It accomplishes what veterinarians and horsemen previously declared 
impossibilities. 

It has power and properties so marvelously effective that it is perfectly 
safe for us to give a written guarantee, a contraot, which protects you 
fully to treat any case named in the Guarantee. 

Do not give up any case of Spavin, Ringbone, Thoroughpin, Curb, 
Splint, Capped Hock, Windpuff, broken down, bowed or strained tendon 
or any case of lameness until you read our booklet and letters. 

Do not fire or blister your horse, write and describe your case. 

Horse can be worked as usual and with boots, as no harm will result 
from scalding of limb or destruction of hair, and without leaving a scar 
or blemish. 



$5 



PER BOTTLE. Written guarantee with every bottle constructed solely to satisfy 
and protect you fully. Need of second bottle 1s improbable except In rarest oases. 
Copy of guarantee, book and letters on every kind of case sent upon application. 
At all druggists and dealers, or sent express prepaid. 



TROY CHEMICAL COMPANY, BINGHAMPTON, NEW YORK, 

D. E, NEWELL, Pacific Coast Agent, 519 Mission St., San Francisco. 



Formerly 

TROY.N.Y, 



PALACE HOTEL, SAN FRANCISCO,! CALIFORNIA. 



TOURISTS and TRAVELERS will, now, with difficulty recognize the famous COURT 
Into which for twenty-fl e years carriages have driven. This spaoe of over a quarter 
of an acre baa recently, by the addition of very handsome furniture, ruge, ohandellecs 
and tropical plants, been converted into a lounging room— the FINEST IN THE 
WORLD. 

The EMPIRE PARLOR— the PALM ROOM, furnished in Cerise, with Billiard and 
Pool tables for the ladies— the LOUIS XV PARLOR the LADIES WRITING ROOM 
and numerous other modern Improvements, together with the unexcelled Cuisine and the 
Most Convenient Location in the City— all add much to the ever increasing popularity 
of this most famous HOTEL. 



THE HOME OF 



McKINNEY, 8818,2:11% 

The unprecedented World's Leading Sire of Extreme Race 
Horse Speed. Fee, $300 until May 1 Oth, after which no 
bookings will be accepted for less than the advanced fee of $500. 



Prince Favorite, 38076, 

TRIAL (3) 2:21; HALF IN 1:09; QUARTER IN :34. 
Son of The Beau Ideal, 2: 1 5%, and Princess Chimes dam of 
Lady of the Manor, 2:04%. :::::::::::: 

This National Horse Show Prize Winner is conceded by many to be 
prospectively the finest stallion ever bred at Village Farm. Fee, $100. 



Fees are invariably payable before mares leave the farm. No 
return privilege, but fees returned if mare fails to have a colt. 
Keep, $2. per week. Our terms are rigidly adhered to in all 
cases and we cannot accept any deviation from them. : : : 

Kindly mention this journal yi T7 • C CI 

when writing and address 1 UC L.U1UI1C V^llV A CXI 1113, N 



UBA, 
Y. 



—9 r~ Qr D |V I T 0F ALL HORSE OWNERS 

fO rLW VvtLlMI AND TRAINERS 

USE AND RECOMMEND 

Campbell'sHorseFootRemedy 

....SOLD BY-. 

SAYRE & SON Sacramento, Cal 

R. T. FRAZIER Pueblo, Colo 

J. G. READ & BRO Ogden, Utah 

JUBINVILLE & NANCE Butte, Mont 

b WgjmmiM A. A. KRAFT CO Spokane, Wash 

kit WHiW A - F - HOSKA HARNESS CO....Tacoma, Wash 
McSORLEY & HENDERSON.... Seattle, Wash 

SETooiltEMttr, JHBIT °- RODDER Stockton, Cal 

WM. E. DETELS Pleasanton, Cal 

W. C. TOPPING San Diego, Cal 

$'4>m JEPSEN SADDLERY CO Los Angeles, Cal 

ujj^^y"* ffiMtfBk H. TBORWALDSON Fresno, Cal 

.! J°r>". WSvdk I JOS. MoTIGQE San Francisco, Cal 

BRYDON BROS. HARNESS MFG. CO 

Los Angeles, Cal 

JAS. B. CAflPBELL & CO.. Manufacturers, 412 W. fladlaon St , CHICAQO ,ILL 




July 8, 1905 1 



15 



PETERS SHELLS VICTORIOUS! 

At San Diesro, Gal., PETERS FACTORY LOADS were 

Used by the Winners of 

First, Second and Third Averages, 

Also Every Team and Trophy Event but One. 

Peters Shells are Improving the Scores of Thousands of Amateur Shooters 



They Will Do It if You Merely Give Them a Chance. 

THE PETERS CARTRIDGE CO., Cincinnati, Ohio 



This Means 
YOU 



To-Day 
not To-Morrow 

RIGHT NOW. WHY? 




BECAUSE no maker has equaled the Parker Gun GRADE for 
_____ CiKADE.anil no maker gives you the value DOLLAR 
for DOLLAR tbat U fountl In the "OLD RELIABLE" PARKER 
GUN. A man who Invest* hU MONKY In The PARKER la a con- 
tented satisfied man. and prides himself on his GOOD Judgment. How abont You? 
We will assist you just the same way Tell ns what you want and you shall have the 
best advice that anybody can give you. WRITE TO-DAY. 



32 Warren St., New York City. 



30 Cherry St., Meriden, Conn. 



* 'Billy" Crosby has held the world's 
long run record of 345 straight 
since March 31, 1901, 

and 

now makes another world's record 
of 419 straight WITH HIS SMITH 
GUN. You can't miss them with 
the Smith. 

Send, for Catalogue. 

HUNTER ARMS CO., Fulton, N. Y. 





NEW MODEL 
AUTOMATIC 
EJECTOR 




We Make 16 Grades, $17.75 to $300. Write for ART CATALOQ to 

THE ITHACA GUN CO., Ithaca, N. Y. 

Coast Branch, PHIL B, BEKEART CO., 114 Second St., San Francisco 



Or 

to 



SHREVE & BARBER CO. 



PIONEER DEALERS 



739 
Market St. 

Send tor 
Catalogue 




521 
Kearny St. 

GXD 

Mailorders 
a Specialty 



QUNS, AMMUNITION, FISHING TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS 



Ballistite Wins! 



Both the High Amateur and General Average 

AND ALSO THE 

Phil B. Bekeart Challenge Trophy-100 Birds- 

At the Second Annual Tournament of the Pacific Coast Trap 
Shooters Association, Ingleside, May 28, 29, 30, were won with 

TITES. 



If You Have Not Yet Tried It, Do So. You Will Like It. 

BAKER & HAMILTON 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS 
SAN FRANCISCO SACRAMENTO 



3Jn@/te 



l lubricates properly the sensitive mechanism. 
/With perfect action the reel never fails at a J 
oment. " 3 in One " wont gum, dry ( 
out, contains no acid. "3 in One" prevents 
rust on every part, add- 
ing years to the life, and 
brightness to the beauty , 
a the finest. Good ' 
W% WTy W71 V for the rod too — preserves 
\ 1^ Tj Wri 1 1 the wood, promoting plia- 
bility—protects the metal. 
Good for fisher also— the j 
delicate, pleasant odor 
keeps off mosquitos. 
Try it. All dealers. Trial bottle sent free. 
Write to 

COLE CO. 
128 Washington Life I3ldg. 
New York City 



REAL 



OIL 



AT STUD. 



T M LITCHFIELD & CO —Drivers' Suits, 
" • Colore and Caps, Official Badges. Corre- 
spondence solicited. 12 Post St., San Francisco. 



BREEDERS' DIRECTORY. 



"HOWARD 8HORTHORN8 ' — QDINTO 
HEKD — 77 premiums. Call ornla State Fairs 
1902-3-4. Registered cattle of beef and milking 
families for sale Write us what you want. 
Howard Cattle Co , 206 Sansome Street, San 
Francisco. 



PETER 9AXE Ss son. Llok House, S. F..Cal. 
Importers, Breeders and Dealers for past 30 years. 
All varieties Cattle, Horses Sbeep, Bogs. High- 
olass breeding stock. Correspondence sollolted. 



HOL8TEIN8— BUTTER BRED FAMILIES. 
Work herd; 90% winners at Stat- and county fairs, 
show ring, and every butter con to -t slnoe 1885 lo 
California No reservations. Stock near S. F 
F. H. Burke, 30 Montgomery St., San Franolsoo. 



JERSEYS, HOLSTEIN8 AND DCKHAM8. 
Dairy Stock specially. Hogs, Poultry. Estab- 
lished 1878. William Ntles & Co.. Irfis Angeles 
Oal. 



VETERINARY. 



Di-. "Will, F*. IE3«*xra. 

M. R. O. V. S.. F. E. Y. M. S. 

VETERINARY SURGEON. 

Member of the Royal College of Vetertnar 
Surgeons, England; Fellow of the Edlnbur 
Veterinary Medical Society; Qraduateof the New 
Veterinary College, Edinburgh; Veterinary Sur- 
geon to the S. F. Fire Department; Live Stork 
Inspector forNew Zealand and AustralianColonlea 
at the port of San Francisco; Professor of Equlnt 
Medlolne, Veterinary Surgery, Veterinary Depart- 
ment University of California; Ez-Presldent ot 
the California State Veterinary Medloal Associa- 
tion; Veterinary Infirmary, Residence and Office, 
San Francisco Veterinary Hospital, 1117 Qolden 
Gate Avenue, near Webster St., San Francisco: 
Telephone Park 128. 



SAN FRANCISOO, 



CALIFORNIA. 



PEDIGREES TABULATED 

And type written 
Ready for framing. 
Write for prices. 

Breeder AMD Sportsman, 30 Geary Street 
San Franolsoo, Cal. 



Ch. CUBA OP KENWOOD 

(Glenbetgh Jr.— Stella) 
CUBA JR. 

(Ch. Cuba of Kenwood- Florida) 
One of the highest olass Field Trial winners in 
America. Seven wins In nine Trials before he 
was two years old. 

STOCKDALE KENNELS 

K. M. DODOE, Manager, 
Bakersfleld, Kern Co., 
Boarding. Pointer Puppies and well-broken 
Dogs for sale 

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Advertitementt under this head one cent per word 
per insertion. Cash to accompany order. 



DALMATIANS. 



I \ ALM ATIAN OR COACH DOG PUPPIES 
for sale pure bred and finely marked. For 
full particulars address the breeder, W. H. G. 
BUCK, Sutter Creek, California. 



COLI.IF.fai 



rpREMENDOUS BARGAINS IN COLLIES. 
1 Send In order and get the very best at bortom 
prloe. GLEN TANA COLLIE KENNELS. P. 
O. Boi 1907 Spokane. Wash. 



IRISH AND SCOTCH TERRIERS. 



TRISH AND SCOTCH TERRIERS FOR SALE. 
x Soottle Puppies sired by Ch. Loyne Ruffian 
and Crimson Rambler Best Irish stook on the 
Coast. Mrs. BRADLEV-DYNE, Baturna P. O.. 
B. C. 



T he Cocker Spaniel 

Its History, Points, 
Standard, Care, 
Training, Etc. 
PRICE, POSTPAID, 50 CENTS 

The Instructions on Care, Training, etc., apply 
toother breeds as woll as to Cockers, and it Is a 
uspful book for the drg owner. Tells how to 
teach them to perform tricks. 

FOR SALE UY THE 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



BLAKE, M0FFITT & T0WNE 



-DEALERS IN- 



55-57-59-61 First Street, S. F. 
Telephone Maim 199 

CALIFORNIA 



16 



f July 8, 1905 



TELEPHONE* 

South 640 




ORSE BOOTS 



THEY EARNED 

all their 

MEDALS 

with 




AMMUNITION 

WRITE FOB 

Illustrated Catalog. 

PACIFIC COAST DEPOT: 

86-88 FIRST ST., S. F. 




THEY EARNED 

all their 

MEDALS 

with 




S M OT G U NS 

WRITE FOR 

Illustrated Catalog. 

PACIFIC coast depot: 



E. E. DRAKE, 



Manager 



JtiUCHESm 



WERE AWARDED TIIE 



ONLY GRAND PRIZE 

BY THE SUPERIOR JURY AT THE ST. LOUIS EXPOSITION, 1904. 



w 



At tbe 
Ohio State Shoot, 
Canton, Ohio, June 14 and IS, 
W. R. Crosby 
using 

New E. C, Improved 

broke 410 straight, 
a real world's record. 
Only powders that are "regular" make 
suoh records possible. 

LAFLIN & RAND POWDER CO. 



C. P. W. BR ANDS. 

SMOKELESS SHOTGUN SHELLS. 

PATTERN 

PERFECTION 

INVINCIBLE 

Loaded with Any Standard Brand of 
Smokeless Powder. 

When ordering from your dealer mention OUR BRANDS 
and kind of Powder wanted. 

We guarantee our loading. 

California Powder Works 

Wells-Fargo Bldg,, 49 Second St 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



A Clean Sweep 

at Indianapolis. 
Preliminary Handicap, June 28th, 
R. R. Barber of Paulllna, Iowa, 
Score 88 ex 100. 
using 

Du PONT SMOKELESS 

Qrand American Handicap, Jun- 20th, 
R. R. Barber of Paulllna, Iowa, 
Score 99 ex 100, 
using 

Du PONT SMOKELESS 

Consolation Handicap, June 30th, 
J. T. Atkinson of Newcastle, Pa., 
Score 99 ex 100, 
using 

DuPONT SMOKELESS 

Do YOU use 

Du PONT SMOKELESS? 



Clabrough, Golcher & Go, 



GUNS 
Gun Goods 



4WSend for Catalogue. 




FISHING 
Tackle 



538 MARKET STREET, S. F. 



These are the Brands of 



FACTORY . . . 
LOADED . . 



SHELLS 



PACIFIC 

CHALLENGE 

SUPERIOR 

EXCELSIOR 



2 



IJuly 15, 1906 



The Crowley Stake No.2 

A SIDE STAKE FOR STARTERS IN 
THE THREE- YEAR-OLD DIVISIONS 

OF THE 

Pacific Breeders Futurity Stakes No. 5 

(FOALS OF 1905-TO TAKE PLACE IN 1908) 

Entries to Close Tuesday, August I, '05 

CONDITIONS. 

A Side Stake of 125 each for Trotting and Pacing Foals of 1905 that were entered or substituted 
and will start In the Three- Year-Old Divisions of the Breeders Futurity In 1908. All money paid in 
on trotting foals to be divided among those starting in the trotting division, and all money paid In 
on pacers to ba divided amm? those that start in the pacing division. Moneys divided 75 and 25 per 
oent and to go to the first and seoond horses in this side stake, according to their positions In the 
final summary of each race. In case all those in the side stake should be distanced in the first heat 
of either of th • regular evems, they shall start in another race best two heats in three, on the same 
day, to decide the money winners. Entrance to the side stake $25 each. The money to be deposited 
in some reputable bank, to remain at Interest until the stake is trotted. 

EntrleJ Close Tnesd»y, August 1st, with V W. KKLLEY, Secretary F. C. T. H. B. A. 

36 Geary St , San Francisco 



4Ti» em» c» t=m> on tm» tn» di» o» m» o» tni» n» mi» c=m» c=n» it 




!SVAGE 



SELF 
FEEDER 



rpHK only rifle of its kind that feeds 
I continually wiih hand work. Has 
every feature of repeating rifle, 
wlthnut magazine. Feeds Use f. ejects 
automatically, cocks automatically. 
Has a solid. American walnut stock. 
When it comes to rifles, thj Savage 
is different. 

"No Savage beast would 
g! dare to trifle 
With a man who shoots 
a Socage liifle." 



c 



a Savage-Junior Single-shot Rifle, $5. 00 




Shoo 



rt, long and long-rifle cartridges. 



Savage-Junior ,22-caliber "Special" $7,00 

£ Made similar to regular "Junior." but fancier. f 



Handsome Savage Indian Watch Fob senton receipt of 15c \^ 

If your dealer won't accommodate you, we will Either 
rifle delivered, charges prepaid, on receiptor price. Try 
ft your dealer first; but send to-day for oatalogue. 

^SAVAGE ARMS CO., 1 Turner St ,Utica,N,Y.U,S,A 



.«ca wrz «ic3> «o> eica «a «o «ia «a «ic3 eia eia «r — \ mcs «a «a «ici 




TOOMBY 

TWO WHEELERS 

ARE THE LEADERS, 

Sulkies in Ail Sizes. 

Pneumatic 
Road and Track Carts. 

Pneumatic Pole Carts 

for Team Work on bDth Road 
and Track. 



High Wheel Jog Carts, 
Long Shift Breaking Carts. 

Send for latest Catalogue to 

S. TOOMEY & CO. 



DEXTER PRINCE STABLES james m 

TRAINING, BOARDING AND SALE 

Cor. of Grove and Baker Streets, just at the Panhandle Entrance to Golden Gate Park 

(Take Hayes, McAllister or Devisadero Street Cars) 

Best located and healthiest Stable in San Francisco. Always a good roadster on hand for 
sale. Careful and experienced men to care for and exerolse park roadsters and prepare horses for 
track use. Ladies can go and return to stable d not have their horses frightened by automobiles 
or cars. 

phone pakk 162 A. J. MARTIN, Prop. 



BOARDING AND LIVERY 

1330 F33£jIj STREET 

BET. LYON AND CENTRL AVE. 

Hayes 8t Cars Pass the Door 



BEST OF ACCOMMODATIONS. 
CALL AND 8EE FOB YOURSELF. 



Pedigrees Tabulated 



and type written ready for framing 
Write for prices. Breeder and 
Sportsman, 36 Geary Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



SAVE-THE-HORSE 



TRADE MARK 




"It works different from anything' I ever saw." Every user remarks 
this fact: 

It accomplishes what veterinarians and horsemen previously declared 
impossibilities. 

It has power and properties so marvelously effective that it is perfectly 
safe for us to give a written guarantee, a contract, which protects you 
fully to treat any case named in the Guarantee. 

Do not give up any case of Spavin, Ringbone, Thoroughpin, Curb, 
Splint, Capped Hock, Windpuff, broken down, bowed or strained tendon 
or any case of lameness until you read our booklet and letters. 

Dj not fire or blister your horse, writo and describe your case. 

Horse can be worked as usual and with boots, as no harm will result 
from scalding of limb or destruction of hair, and without leaving a scar 
or blemish. 



$5 



PER BOTTLE. Written guarantee with every bottle constructed solely to satisfy 
and protect you fully. Need of second bottle is improbable except in rarest oases. 
Copy of guarantee, book and letters on every kind of case sent upon application. 
At all druggists and dealers, or sent express prepaid. 



TROY CHEMICAL COMPANY, BINGHAMPTON, NEW YORK. "-BS««. 

D. E. NEWELL, Pacific Coast Agent, 519 Mission St., San Francisco. 



AUCTION SALE. 

35 head of High-class Driving Horses 35 

of which 25 are from the Occidental Land and Improvement Co., Sharon, 
Cal. and are by Teheran 2:24 and Waterford out of high-class mares. 
Also 10 head consigned by C. E. Needham, Bellota, Cal., by 
such splendid stallions as Guy McKinney, Charles Derby, 
Directed, etc., out of well-bred mares. Sale takes place 

MONDAY EVENING. JULY 24, 1905, 



AT EIGHT 
O'CLOCK 



Horses at yard Jnly 22d Send for Catalogue. 

FRED H. CHASE & CO, ftSEZSA, 

1732 Market St., near Van Ness Ave., S. F., Cal. 



Live Stock Auctioneers, 




Cut=Under Truck 



This Truck Is the result of years of endeavor to produce a wagon that has great 
carrying capacity, ample strength without superfluous weight, low 
enough to the ground to minimize the labor of loading. 
Can turn short among trees, and can be used on 
the roads as well as on the farm. 
The "Jersey" is a pronounced success, not only for the transportation of fruit, 
but as a general purpose dray In villages and small cities. 



16-18 DKUMM ST., 



SAN FEANCISCC 



PALACE HOTEL, SAN FRANCISCO, r CALIFORNIA. 



5 



TOURISTS and TRAVELERS will, now, with difficulty recognize the famous COURT 
Into which for twenty-fl e years carriages have driven. This spaoe of over a quarter 
of an acre has recently, by the addition of very handsome furniture, rugs, chandeliers 
and tropical plants, been converted into a lounging room— the FINEST IN THE 
WORLD. 

The EMPIRE PARLOR— the PALM ROOM, furnished in Cerise, with Billiard and 
Pool tables for the ladles— the LOUIS XV PARLOR the LADIES WRITING ROOM 
and numerous other modern Improvements, together with the unexcelled Cuisine and the 
Most Convenient Location in the City— all add much to the ever increasing popularity 
of this most famous HOTEL. 



JULY 15, 1905] 



3 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

F. W. KELLEY, PROPRIETOR. 

Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

— OIFICI- 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O BOX 2300. 
Telephone: Black 586. 



erms— One Year S3, Six Months SI. 75, Three Months 81 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 
„ Money snould be sent by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
iddressed to F. W. Kelley, 38 Geary St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name and 
»ddress, not neoessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee 
of good faith. 



San Francisco, Saturday, July 15, ioc-5- 



BREEDERS OP HARNESS HORSES on the Pa- 
cific Coast, those who have money invested in 
stallions, brood mares and stock farms, should be 
active in the promotion of harness meetings. They 
are the one3 most concerned in keeping up the inter- 
est in harness horses, either for road or track use, as 
this interest is the main cause of maintaining values 
and keeping them at a profitable point. It is the 
reputation for speed and gameness which his get ob- 
tain in races that causes the produce of a stallion to 
sell lor good values at private sale and in the auction 
ring, and therefore every stallion owner should do 
everything in bis power to promote race meetings 
wherever they are held according to recognized rules. 
There are thirty counties in California that should 
have harness meetings every year, and if the trotting 
horse breeders who reside in those counties would 
only display a reasonable amount of energy and en- 
terprise, there would be a California circuit which 
for class and number of horses could not be equaled 
by more than two or three SUtes in the Union. The 
day of the big stock farm has almost passed and the 
email breeders are the ones that must supply the 
mirkets in the future. It does not matter how much 
money one of these smaller breeders has invested in 
his stallions and mare?, unless the produce of 
his farm can show speed on the training track 
or in races there will be no demand for them 
beyond that of road and carriage use, and unless 
meetings are numerous and a good California circuit 
organized, there will be few owners who will train 
after purchase. It is only the exceptional horse that 
will be taken across the Rocky Mountains to be raced. 
Without a circuit of meetings the vast majority of 
trotting bred colts will only be broken and used for 
road or other working purposes and racing and rec- 
ords will be unknown to them. Consignments to the 
big auctions will not be profitable for breeders, as 
horses without known speed or whose relatives are 
not showing speed, will not bring the high prices. It 
is the few crackerjacks that sell for large sums 
and that make the average price of a consignment 
high and profitable. Without speed contests to 
prove to the world the qualities of the trotters and 
pacers on the farms, breeders may as well quit 
breeding for speed as there will be no use nor de- 
mand for it. There is a general complaint in Cali- 
fornia that the breeding done this year was far les9 
than last year's record, and this state of affairs can 
be directly attributed to the falling off in the number 
of fairs and race meetings since the agricultural dis- 
tricts were refused aid by the State. If breeders de- 
sire a revivalin breeding, and also of the interest once 
displayed in harness racing they must do something 
themselves to promote them. A great meeting closed 
last week at Los Angeles. It has attracted the atten- 
tion of horsemen all over the country to the horses 
that obtained records and to the stallions and mares 
that produced them. The winning of the three-year- 
old trot by Princess Louise wherein she gained a 
record of 2:19, has done moie to provo to the public 
that Coronado 2:12£ will be a great producer, than all 
the hot air about him that could be blown through 
newspapers and other advertising mediums for 
months. It is purses won and records made by his 
colts that makes a stallion valuable. It is the excite- 
ment and pleasure of racing and the expectation of 
winning that causes men to pay out money for service 
fees, training, harness, bikes, shoeing and feed. It 
is money hungup i.j purses that makes the horses go 
and keeps up the breeding business, and unless those 
who have money invested in stallions, mares and stock 
farms see to it that more meetings are giveD, they 
will find that their property is lessening in value. 
There is an old saying and a true one that the good 
Lord doeB not help those who do not help themselves. 



IN THE DEATH of Blaine S. McMahan, the 
* Breeder and Sportsman has lost from his staff 
one of the brightest minds that ever guided a pen to 
furnish news for its columns. He had been connected 
with the journal since the first of March this year, 
and from the day he first entered the office his genial 
personality, his frank open manner and a deep 
interest in his work made him esteemed and 
loved by his associates. He was a great lover of 
horses and being a close observer his descriptions of 
them and their contests were accurate and fair, his 
big, generous heart never permitting his pen to indite 
harsh criticisms or unkind words of anyone. He was 
a young man, about 25 years of age, of handsome form 
and feature, with a cheery disposition and laughing 
eye that banished care and sorrow from every group 
of which he was a member. Yet he was not frivolous 
in the least, but of an earnest, cheerful, hopeful, 
happy nature, honest and faithful to every trust, a 
wholesome, hearty, lovable youDg man. He came of 
excellent stock, his father the late Dr. McMahan 
having been for many years a practicing physician and 
leading citizen of Rushville, Indiana, and his heart- 
broken and widowed mother and loving sister now 
reside in Indianapolis, where he "grew up 1 ' as it were 
in the office of Z'/ie Western Horseman, and was regu- 
larly employed there until he came to California last 
winter. It is an awful thing for a bright and promis- 
ing young man to be taken by death from a loving 
mother, but when cut down so suddenly and so far 
from home, the blow is doubly terrible and severe. 
Blaine McMahan had made hundreds of acquaintances 
since coming to this State, and from each and every 
one there will go out to that mother and sister in far 
off Indiana, the deepest sympathy that can be felt by 
human hearts for their awful and irreparable Joss. 
May a kind Providence sustain them in the hours of 
their deep affliction and the knowledge be some com- 
fort to them that their manly son and brother so 
endeared himself to those he met during his short life 
out here by the sunset sea, that they deeply and 
sincerely mourn his death and will always hold in fond 
remembrance their acqnaintance with one who by his 
noble attributes had earned their highest respect and 
esteem. 

A SALE OF HORSES of more than usual merit 
will be held by Fred H. Chase & Co. (successors 
to Killip & Co.) at their salesyard, 1732 Market street, 
this city, during the evening of July 24th. These 
horses are consigned by two breeders — the Occidental 
Land and Improvement Company of Sharon, and 
Mr. C. E. Needham of Bellota. The first named has 
used the stallions Teheran 2:24 and Ilderim in breed- 
ing harness horses, selecting them for the fine con- 
formation, style and action, and mating them with 
mares of the same qualities and that showed speed. 
They have been very successful, and the horses to be 
sold are well proportioned, handsome young animals. 
Mr. Needham has long been a breeder of fine horses, 
his mares nearly all being of Morgan stock, which is 
now more popular than ever with breeders. He has 
used the stallions Steve Whipple 2:12, Directed (a son 
of the great Director 2:17 out of the dam of Steve 
Whipple) and Guy McKinney, one of the best bred 
McKinneys living. There are several colts in the 
consignment well entered in stakes — one of them in 
$57,000 worth, another in $10,000 worth. Send to 
Fred H. Chase & Co., 1732 Market street, for a 
catalogue. 

Horrible and Fatal Accident. 

Last Wednesday evening at 9:50 o'clock Blaine S. 
McMahan, formerly of the Western Horseman, Indi: n- 
apolis, but during the past four months associate 
editor of tho Breeder and Sportsman, was 
instantly killed at the Southern Pacific depot at 
Fresno, and Willard Zibbell, ton of Mr. and Mrs. J. 
W. Zibbell of this city was so terribly injured that 
one foot and both hands bad to be amputated. The 
following account of this dreadful accident is from 
the Fresno "Republican of Thursday morning: 

"The accident in all of itsclrcumstances is a sicken- 
ing ono. The two young men worearound town during 
the evening chatting with friends and assisting in the 
preparations for the meet of tho Pacific Coast Trot- 
ting Horse Breeders Association next week. But a 
few minutes before tho time of the accident, they had 
visited the editoral rooms of the Republican, where 
McMahan had left an article descriptive of some of 
the horses that are to race here, which article appears 
in another part of this paper. They then went down 
to the station to look into the matter of the arrival of 
some of the horses in which Zibbell was interested. A 
few minuteB later, their friends learned that McMahan 
was a mangled corpse, and that his companion was 
maimed and crushed almost beyond hope of recovery. 

The accident occurred at 9:50 o'clock. No witnesses 
to the occurrence have been found except the mem- 
bers of the switching crew. Yard Master Crowley for 
them has given out the following statement of what 
happened: 

The switch engine with Engineer Lawrence and 



Engine Foreman Williams was coming north between 
Kern and Tulare streets, propelling three box cars. 
The engineer was in the cao, and Williams was on the 
forward, end of the leading car, waving a lantern. A - 
they came to Tulare street, he noticeo two men start 
to cross the track just in front of him, and he shouted 
to tdem to look out. They seemed to pay no heed, 
and he thought they would miss the car, but kept, 
shouting until ho could almost touch them. The 
train was going at about four miles an hour. 

At the instant, the men were struck, the signal for 
stopping was given, and the engine came to a stand- 
still in thirty feet. The men bad been dragged under 
the wheels, ana the whole length of the car pasted 
over them before they were rescued from under the 
car by the trainmen. 

Word was sent for Dr. J. L. Maupin, who is the 
local surgeon for the Southern Pacific Company, who 
came at once, and ordered an ambulance 'or the car- 
rying of Zibbell to the Burnett Sanitarium. It was 
seen that McMahan had died instantly, and a little 
later, the remains were taken to the morgue at 
Stephens & Bean. 

At the time of the accident, two fellow turfmen of 
Zibbell's were at the depot, J . R. Albertson and A. L 
McDonald, and they ran with other people to the 
scene. Arriving there they saw Zibbell propped up 
against a box, and recognized him from his voice. 
He was conscious but groaning with terrible pain. 

His first words were, "1 am all shot to pieces — how 
is Mac," referring to McMahan. 

He was comforted with the assurance that his com- 
panion escaped. 

Albertson and McDonald accompanied Zibbell to the 
sanitarium and on the way up he again Inquired for 
McMahan. This time he was told that McMahan 
was about as bad off as he was, and Zibbell then 
seemed to realize bis companion's fate anu abked for 
him no more. 

At the sanitarium he lamented the fact that his 
racing days were over, just as he had begun to obtain 
distinction. He implored his companions not to 
allow the doctors to cut off his arm. 

Zibbell's injuries make his recovery extremely un- 
likely. His left arm was broken and mangled so that 
it had to be amputated; his right shoulder was 
crushed and his back bruised; his right hand was 
crushed and must be taken off today; one foot was 
ground off. There were no severe internal injuries. 
Despite the terrible margliDg he maintained con- 
sciousness, and bore up with remarkable bravery. 

Before submitting to an anetthetic he asked to have 
hisfatheraod mother sent for and his sister' Georgie." 

McMahan's body was horribly mangled from the 
chest down ward. The upper part of the trunk and 
the head were comparatively little injured. The 
only injury to the faco was a bruise under one eye. 
The aims were not hurt except for the crushing of 
the right hand. 

Willard Zibbell is the son of J. W. Zibbell, the 
veteran driver, whose home is at No. 672 Eleventh 
avenue, San Francisco. The young man is about 26 
years of age and followed his father's career. In con- 
versation with a Republican reporter an hour or so 
before the accident he laughingly remarked that he 
was reared on a race track, being around horses all 
his life. 

For the last two years he has been driving and is 
spoken of by horsemen as a very promising man. He 
brought a string of five horses uere to race next week 
among them being a green horse with which he won 
a great race in Los Angeles last week. 

McMahan was a very genthmaDly young man wlio 
m ulc friends with every one be met He was assistant 
secretary of the Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders 
Association and was in Fresno working up interests in 
the race meet. Before the Los Angeles meeting he 
spent about a week here and returned last Monday. 
He was a sporting writer on the Breeder and 
Sportsman and an unusually capable man in his line. 

In a conversation with a Republican reporter several 
days ago, McMahan remarked that he thought he 
had a charmed life, as he had been in several railroad 
accidents and had escaped each time without a 
scratch. In one accident he was the only man in tho 
car he wa9 in ti escape." 

At ton o'clock Friday morning Willard Zibbell was 
still living and the attending physicians gave strong 
hopes of his recovery. He has lost both hands and 
one foot, but his strong physique and rugged health 
have thus far enabled him to resist the terribleshock. 

Willard Zibbell has been considered one of the most 
promieing young horsemon on this Coast. He is a 
tall, handsome young man about twenty-five years of 
age and a born horseman. A "home boy " of excellent 
habits, straightforward and upright in his dealings, 
he is the idol of bis father, mother and sister with 
whom he resided. As a trainer of harness horses he 
was meeting with great success, and his winning of 
the 2:24 class trot at Los Angeles on the last day of 
the meeting with Adam G. 2:141 was looked upon by 
all his friends as tho beginning of a bright career for 
him as trainer and driver. His father refused $8000 
for the horse the same day, intending that Willard 
should take the McKinney gelding through the 
Grand Circuit next year. Mr. aid Mrs. Zibbell and 
daughter are with tho son at Fresno, having been 
summoned right after tho accident and are doing 
everything and having everything done that medical 
science and tender care can do to relieve his suffer- 
ings. No braver young man over lived than Willard 
Zibbell, and his thoughts immediately after and since 
the accident have been of his dead companion and his 
own sorrowing family rather than of himself. We 
extend the sincerest sympathy to the unfortunate 
young man and his family in their terrible affliction. 



4 



[July 15, 1905 



CLOSE AT LOS ANQELES. 



FIFTH DAY. 

LOS Angeles, July 7.— This was a day of surprises 
at Agricultural Park, as outsiders in the betting won 
both of the races that were finished, and the first 
choice in the third race seemed to be in a bad way 
when the race was postponed on account of darkness. 
The fun started with the three-year-old pacing race, 
in which the two-year-old colt Rockaway was one of 
the starters, and the talent picked him to win the 
money on the strength of his good race of Wednes- 
day when he took a record of 2:15$ with comparative 
ease. He did not keep hiB backers in suspense long 
as he was distanced in the first heat, but in justice to 
the colt it might be said that he had all the worst of 
the argument and would undoubtedly have done bet- 
ter with an even break. Just as the word was given 
in the first heat he made a break and his driver, 
Jacob Brelliar, not hearing the starter say "Go!" 
pulled him up, and before he realized that the others 




Princess Louise (3) 2:19, b. f. by Coronado 2:1»4. 

were on their way scrambling for the money it was 
too late to redeem himself and he finished behind the 
flag. Frank Wright's Diablo filly Deviletta won the 
heat in 2 : 1 4 J after a hustling finish with Memonio, 
and the former was naturally made a favorite over 
the remainder of the field. There was a different 
story to tell in the next heat, however, as Memonio 
was the first one to reach the wire after she and Dev- 
iletta had had a lively journey. The time of the sec- 
ond heat was only 2:17}, and both of the heat-winning 
fillies seemed pretty well tired, but Memonio stuck to 
her business all the time and managed to win the next 
two heats with plenty to spare from Kinney Wood. 
Memonio is owned by Mannie Reams, but was driven 
by M. G Leggett. The Zolock filly Kinney Wood 
paced a nice race and was well up at the finish of the 
last two beats. 

The 2:11 pace was the feature event of the card and 
eight sidewheelers scored for the word, with Fred 
Ward's brown gelding Vision and the stallion Jooesa 
Basler selling at $b apiece in the auctions against $5 
for the field. When the word was given for the first 
heat Vision, Jonesa Basler and Rita H. started out to 
make the pace, and they sailed down the backstretch 
at a merry clip, reaching the half-mile pole in 1:02}. 
Here the pace began to tell and they slackened up a 
little, and after a hard drive throughout the last 
quarter Vision got the verdict from the Basler horse 
in 2:09}. These two started out for business again in 
the second heat and practically made a two-horse race 
out of it, and as they headed down the stretch every 
one was wondering which one would win; but right 
here something happened, as J. D. Springer came out 
of the ruck with the chestnut mare Miss Idaho by 
Nutwood Wilkes, and after a shortargument near the 
distance stand came on and beat them both in 2:10}. 
From then on there wa9 nothing to it but Mist Idaho, 
as Mr. Springer was always out in front with her and 
she appeared to have quite a little in reserve at the 
end of each heat. Tidal Wave beat Rita H. for third 
money after a hard drive in the fourth heat. 

Pat Rose was an even money favorite over the field 
in the 2:20 trot, but he was unable to win a heat in 
three, and when the race was postponed on account 
of darkness his chances of winning looked pretty slim. 
He had all his speed with him to day, but continuous 
and tiresome scoring evidently caused him to lose con- 
fidence in himself and he made bad breaks in each 
heat. The first two heats went to the black Zombro 
gelding Charlie T., driven by Al McDonald, and it is 
doubtful if he should not have had the race, but after 
reaching the wire first on a break in the third heat 



the judges awarded It to Ambush, who was a half 

length back. The summaries: 

The J. H Reynolds Stake, three year-old class pacing, purse 
1600 

Memonio, b f by D9inonlo-May Mamie. (Leggett) 2 111 

Deviletta, b f by Diablo (Wright) 12 3 3 

Kinney Wood blk f by Zolock (Durfee) 3 3 2 2 

Nordwell, b o by Demonlo (Reamsi dls 

Rockaway (2), ch c by Stoneway (Brolliar) dls 

Tlme-2:144, 2:17=1*, 2:18, 2:20. 
The Angelus Stake, 2:11 class pacing, purseSIOOO. 
Miss Idaho, oh m by Nutwood Wilkes, dam by Forest 

ClayJr (Springer) 6 111 

Vision, br g by Vanquish (Ward) 13 2 4 

Jonesa Basler. br s by Robt. Basler (Owens) 2 2 4 5 

Tidal <Vave, ch s by Nutwood Wilkes (Irvin) 4 5 3 2 

Rita H .brm by McKlnney (Durfee) 3 4 5 3 

Le Rol. b g by Altamont (S. Llndjay) 5 6 6 7 

Queen B. bm by Comet (L.Lindsay) 7 7 7 6 

Ira, bg by Iris (Maben) 8 8 dls 

Tlme-2:09W, 2:104, 2:11^, 2:10*. 
SIXTH DAY. 

Los ANGELES, July 8th— Today saw the close of 
the meeting here and one of the biggest crowds 
of the week saw the racing. The feature of the 
card was the special $600 purse and a silver cup 
for the free-for-all pacers and it proved a very 
interesting race, although Zolock took down the 
lion's share of the purse without extending himself to 
the limit. Kelly Briggs and Edwin S. were the only 
other starters, and before the first heat Zolock 
brought $10 in the auctions against $4 for the field, so 
It will be seen that his victory was a popular one for 
the bettors who like to play the sure thing kind. 
There wasn't very much excitement about the first 
two heats as Zolock was always out In the lead and 
won from Kelly Briggs, and then Edwin S. in 2:07 and 
2:08 respectively. In the third heat things went 
along in the same old way until they were headed into 
the stretch and Zolock seemed to have the race well 
in hand but Chadbourne came along next to the rail 
with a rush with Edwin S. and at the distance stand 
was at Zolock's wheel and seemingly with a possible 
chance to win but Delaney took Zolock over toward 
the pole far enough to keep Edwin S. from coming 
through and led to the wire by about a length in 
2:08. After deliberating quite a while the judges 
placed Zolock last for fouling Edwin S. and gave the 
heat to the last named pacer, but the decision had no 
effect on the result of the race as Zolock came right 
back again in 2:08$, letting Edwin S. down witn 
second money and third for Kelly Briggs. Edwin S. 
paced a very clever race, although he was hardly up 
to a hard proposition like this, and showed that he 
will be a hard horse to beat In a week or so. 

About the sleekest green trotter tbat ha9 come to 
town lately was turned loose by Willard Zibbell in 
the 2:24 trot when he won the money in straight heats 
with the bay gelding Adam G. This horse has been 
pretty well touted all spring and was a red hot favorite 
in the auctions but he had never been started in a 
race and it remained to be seen what he would do in 
company. Suffice to say he made good in a manner 
that was emphatic and although he did not have to 
go very fast, several old horsemen who saw the race 
were enthusiastic enough to say that 2:08 will not 
stop him. When the word was given for the first 
heat the field was sent away with Adam G. taking the 
dust from the whole bunch but this did not seem to 




Kenneth C. (3) 2:17, br e. by McKlnney : 1 1 , . 

bother him a bit and after trailing along to the half 
he was sent around his field with ease and won in a 
jog in 2:14}. The next heats were play for him and 
both were trotted in 2:15. Sam Bowers, Oro Belmont 
and Zambretta were all hustling for the rest of the 
money, and after some lively scrambling finished in 
the order named. Adam G. is a racy looking seven- 
year-old gelding by McKinney, out of Nona Y. 2:184, 
by Admiral and is the property of J. W. Zibbell & 
Son of San Francisco. He is perfectly gaited, carries 
himself well, never makes a bobble and it is hard to 
tell just where he will stop. He was bred by Presi- 
dent E P. Heald of the Trotting Horse Breederi 
Association. 

The Commonwealth was made a luke warm favorite 



in the 2:14 trot and taking into consideration his good 
race of Wednesday figured to win the money which 
he did quite handily in straight heats. It was one of 
the best betting races of the meeting and all kinds of 
wild plunges were made during the progress of the 
event, first on Una K. then on Lady Madison and 
again on the white gelding Rozelle but the only time 
when he seemed to be in difficulty was at the finish of 
the second heat when Rozelle brought him down to a 
head finish in 2:134, which was the best time made 
during the race. In theother heats the whitegelding 
went into the air at times when he seemed to have a 
"look in." Lady Madison had as much speed as any- 
thing in the party but evidently was not at herself 
and refused to stand a drive when called upon. Una K. 
was also erratic and the others didn't call for much. 
The summaries: 

The Van Nuys Stake, 2:20 class trotting, purse $1000. 

Charlie T. bl g by Zombro-Sarah Benton by Albion 

(MoDonald) 112 1 

Ambush, br s by Zolock (Bunnell) 2 5 12 

Pat Rote, bg byFalrose (Wright) 5 2 5 5 

Verona M., b m by Diablo (Brooks) 3 4 3 3 

Albuquerque, ch ■ by Robt. McGregor (Kent) 4 3 4 4 

Billy Dooley, b g by Bay Bird (Freeman) dls 

Sona, b m by McKlnney (Williams) dis 

Three heats trotted July 7. 

Time-2:144, 2:18. 2:17, 2:15. 

The W. A. Clark Jr. Stake, 2:14 class trotting, purse 11000. 
The Commonwealth, br s by Shadeland Onward-Action 

by Onward (Lindsay) 1 1 1 

Rozelle. w g by Bob Mason (Mabt-n) 3 2 6 

Una Km b m by McKinney (Williams) 6 3 2 

Lady Madison, b m by Jas Madison (F.Ward) 2 5 4 

Red Skin, ch a by Red Cloud (Irvin) 5 4 3 

Zambra, b g by McKlnney (H.Ward) 4 dis 

Time— 2:14*. 2:134, 2:15. 

Special for free-for-all pacers, purse {600 and silver cup. 

Zolock, br s by McKinney Gazelle by Gosslper 

(Delaney) 113 1 

Edwin S. ch g by Dr. Hicks (Chadbourne) 3 2 12 

Kelly Briggs. br g by Bayswater Wilkes (Wright) 2 3 2 3 

Time— :31K 1:02 1:354 2:07 
:32J£ 1:04 1:37 2:08 
:S3 1:0 H 1:37 2:08 
:33 1:04 1:37 2:084 

The Robt. A. Smith Stake, 2:24 class trotting, purse S1000. 

Adam G , b g by McKlnney-Nona Y 2:15 by Acmlral 

(Zibbell) 1 1 1 

Sam Bowers, ch g by Jos. Simpson (Lindsay) 3 2 3 

Oro Belmont, blk g by Oro Wilkts (Reams) 2 3 5 

Zombrella, br m by Zombro (Ward) 4 4 2 

Little Babe, blk m by Bradtmoor (Boy) 5 5 4 

Ktnmont, br n by McKlnney (Durfee) 6 dls 

Mamie Elizabeth, ch m by Red Regent (Maben) 7 dls 

Time— 2:14«, 2:15, 2:15. 

TIM ■ RECORDS DURING MEETING. 

To beat2:133£, pacing- 
Bonnie Alsie, br m by Faustlno (Kent) won 

Time— 2:084- 

To beat 2:24, trotting— 

Mamie Elizabeth, ch m by Red Regent (Maben) won 

Time— 2:21 

To beat 2:30, trotting— 

Nocturno, blk s by Alphonso (Moaner; won 

Time— 2:26. 

To beat 2:30, trotting— 

Dixie S., blk m by Zolock (Delaney) won 

Time-2:26. 

To beat 2:30, trotting— 

Fernwood.br m by Silkwood (Delaney) won 

Tlme-2:27. 

B. McMahan. 



Pueblo, Colorado, Results. 

July 7— Trotting, 2:34 class, purse $500. 

Redemption, b g by Superior (Buah) 4 111 

Ura Bell, b m by Happy Heir (Sproule) 6 5 6 7 

Rosalind, b m by Stam B (Hayes) 2 2 3 3 

Miss Agnes, b m by Agamemnon (Loomlsj 13 5 6 

Major Bunch, oh h by Penchant (Davis) 7 5 7 5 

Iosa, b m by Phllomedes (Stellar) 6 4 4 4 

Nettle Von Grundy, b m by Vendor (Johnson) 3 6 2 2 

Time-2:20X, 2:21, 2:214. 

Trotting, special, purse $400. 

Dewey, s g by Superior (L.J Smith) 1 1 1 

Queen Knight, b g by Knight (Miller) 2 2 2 

J.J. M.Jr., bg (Davis) 3 3 4 

Lord Gilbert, b g by Saraway (Cummings) 4 4 3 

Time, 2:22, 2:194, 2:21. 

July 8th— Paotng, speoial, purse $300. 

Stranger O., b g unknown (Frost) 2 111 

Joe Younger bl g by Joe Young (Hayes) 12 2 3 

Lady Elgin, br m by Baron Posey (Johnson) 3 3 3 2 

Lady Brook, br m by Silent Brook (Cummings) 4 4 4 4 

Time— 2:814, 2:19!5, 2:214, 2:24. 

Trotting Driving Club race, $100, half-mile heats. 

SallleB.bm (Fitzpatrick) 2111 

Jltsu.bg (Luqueer) 14 3 3 

Bell B., bl m (Jackson) 3 2 2 s 

Silver Maid, s m (Sproule) 5 3 4 4 

King Cyrano b h (Voorhees) 4 5 5 5 

Tlme-l:174, 1:17, 1:16. 1:15. 



Santa Rosa Driving Club. 

An enthusiastic meeting of horsemen was held at 
Santa Rosa last Tuesday evening and temporary or- 
ganization of a new driving club was effected. Mr. 
P. H. Quinn was called to the chair, Mr. Walter C. 
Nolan wae elected Secretary and Mr. W. E. Healey 
treasurer. Chairman Quinn was authorized to ap- 
point a committee of fifteen on membership and 
organization, and Frank S. Turner, Henry Carlton 
and Fred J. Yandle were appointed a committee on 
by-laws. It it proposed to give matinee and regular 
racing on the famous Santa Rosa Farm track, which 
Is one of the best appointed and fastest In California. 



Jackson's Napa Soda is sold In every city, town 
and hamlet in the State. 



JULY 15, 1905] 



Whs gvcebev tint* gyovtaman 



5 




Now for Fresno. 



The track is very fast. 



And the program a good one. 



Breeders meeting opens there on Wednesday next. 



All the fast pacers and trotters will start during 
the meeting. 

The fastest new trotter of the year is Pat Rose 
2:12} by Falrose. 

The average time for the seventy three heats trot- 
ted and paced at Los Angeles last week was 2a2}. 



Sixteen heats were paced in from 2:10 to 2:06 at the 
Los Aageles meeting, which is "going some" for the 
first meeting of the year. 



Woodland Daisy, a three-year-old filly by Nazote, 
took a record of 2:21] in the second heat of a pacing 
race at Parsons, Kansas, June 22d. 



An opportunity to get a good sulky, speed cart, 
road cart, harness, boots, blankets, etc., is offered by 
the Peart sale at Colusa, August 9th. 



The great question with the horsemen in California 
now is: "Can they beat Zolock at Fresno or Santa 
Rosa, or make him beat his mark of 2:06?" 



William Leach, the well known auctioneer of Marys- 
ville, will ask for the bids at the sale of Mr. E. C. 
Pearl's trotting bred horses at Colusa, August 9th. 



The first of the get of Coronado to start in a race is 
the three-year-old filly Princess Louise that won her 
race and took a mark of 2:19 at Los Angeles last week. 



In Japan a law has been passed which provides for 
the compulsory gelding of all two-year-old stallions 
not considered of sufficient quality for stud purposes. 



Zolock 2:06, besides reducing his record at Los 
Angeles, had a new performer added to his list in 
Dixie a trotting filly, that took a time record of 2:26. 



Th9 meeting at Windsor, which is the "curtain 
raiser" of the Grand Circuit, will open on Monday 
next. There will be a meeting at Columbus the same 
week. 

Zephyr 2:11 by Zombro has worked to her record 
twice within the last two weeks, and has shown no 
signs of unsoundness so far. A lower record is doubt- 
less within her reach. 



The pacers Bolivar and Josie, both in the East View 
Farm stable, were worked out together in 2:14} at 
Empire track one day last week, and paced the last 
quarter in 30 seconds. 

The three-year-old gelding Buster Brown by Mc- 
Neer, a son of McKinney and out of a mare by Dawn, 
that is to be sold at the Peart sale at Colusa August 
9th is worth training for the races. 



Jamas Butler is now the sole owner of the Empire 
City track at Yonkers, N. Y., he having last week 
purchased the interest of Charles C. Lloyd, the last 
person to dispose of his interest in the property. 



Bonnie Alsie, the brown pacing mare by Faustino, 
that Walter Maben has been training at Los Angeles, 
started during the meeting there to beat her record 
of 2:13 J. She knocked five seconds from it by a mile 
in 2:08*. 

Searchlight is now at Lexington, Kentucky, where, 
it is said, he will be kept in the future It is said that 
his owner, W. Bronston, an Eastern millionaire, in- 
tends putting him at the head of a breeding stud 
which he is to establish. 



James Butler started Mamie R. 2:15* in a matinee 
race at Empire track June 29th, but she did not win, 
making a break In each heat. The miles were in 2:17} 
and 2:16. The little mare must be off, as these are the 
first breaks she has made this season. 



Nocturno, the stallion by Alfonso that took a time 
record of 2:26 at Los Angeles, will now be shipped to 
Albany, Oregon, where he will make a season. He 
trotted his mile very nicely and can greatly reduce 
the time if placed In regular training. 



Six 2:10 performers at one meeting, and that the 
first of the year, is a pretty good record for any 
country. Los Angeles holds this record, and while 
all are pacers the fact that they paced sixteen heats 
in 2:10 or better shows that they have class. 



There is talk of a three days' meeting at Concord in 
September. If the managers of the track will adver- 
tise a program of harness races with programs rang- 
ing from $200 to $300, we have no doubt but It would 
fill and some excellent racing result. The new Con- 
cord track is in very good shape and the people of 
Contra Costa county are good patrons of the sport. 
After the State Fair is over there will be a large num- 
ber of owners ready to race anywhere In central 
California. 



Gil Curry and Myron MoHenry, who left the trot- 
ters some time ago for the runners, are back with the 
harness brigade again, and it will probably not be 
long before Scott Hudson will be looking for a few 
"prospects" and pumping up the tires of his old bikes. 



There are five colts by John A. McKerron 2:04* in 
Doc Tanner's stable. They are the four-year-old 
trotter Harry McKerron 2:24}, two three-year-olds, 
two two-year-olds and one yearling. They are all 
good sized, handsome and are all promising speed 
prospects. 

The first meeting between Tiverton and Sweet 
Marie will come off next week at Philadelphia. The 
gelding is in line shape and trotted a mile In 2:13 last 
week, with the last quarter in 29} seconds. Sweet 
Marie has been a mile in 2:08, half in 1:02 and a quar- 
ter in 30 seconds. 



Dr. J. W. Hammond of Byron, who never drives 
anything but a good road horse, and has bred quite a 
few, sent his mare Blue Bells to Mr. J. D. Springer's 
highly bred stallion Suomi this year and believes her 
to be with foal. Suomi is by the great Zombro and 
out of the dam of Stam B. 



James Thompson drove John Caldwell a mile in 
2:08, with the last half in 1:03, at the Cleveland track 
one day last week. He looks and acts like a money 
winner Albuta is showing lots of speed, but Mr. 
Thompson does not like him as he does the Strathway 
gelding, as he is not so reliable. 



Lafe Shafer has resigned as trainer at Terrace 
Farm, Titusville, to take a position as assistant to Ed 
Geers. Zephyr 2:11, Elegance by Dare Devil, and 
King Bardo by Sternberg, all owned at Terrace Farm, 
and that have been in Shafer's care at Memphis all 
winter, will go into Geers' stable. 



The owner of the pacing stallion Daedallon 2:10 has 
so much business to attend to requiring bis absence 
from the State more than half the time during the 
summer racing seascn, that he desires to sell this 
elegantly bred son of Diablo. He will be priced right. 
Address this office for particulars. 



It is said that Sweet Marie can beat the fast pacer 
Nervolo 2:04} any part of the mile in their workouts. 
Those who know how fast Nervolo can reel off an 
eighth or a quarter can appreciate the speed of the 
daughter of McKinney. She and Tiverton 2:04} will 
meet on Wednesday next at Philadelphia. 



The horses consigned by C. E. Needbam to the 
auction to be held in this city July 24th at Fred H. 
Chase & Co. 's salesyard are sired by Steve Whipple 
2:12, Directed, a son of Director, Guy McKinney, a 
son of McKinnny, and Chas. Derby 2:20. They are 
out of mares that are full of Morgan blood. 



Lisonjero 2:08} by Dexter Prince is trotting like a 
2:04 horse this year, and is better gaited than ever, 
although he had the reputation of being the easiest 
going, lightest shod trotter on the turf last season. 
He won his first start this year at Saugus two weeks 
ago but did not have to trot within five seconds of his 
record. 

One of the new rules of the New York Driving Club 
is that horses tied for second or third position in the 
summary are awarded positions according to their 
standing in the faster heat of the race, and it looks 
like a pretty fair rule For instance, if A. 's positions 
were 2-3 and B.'s 3-2 and the time was 2:15 — 2:13, then 
B. would be awarded second place and A. third. 



Mr. Devereux, the Cleveland amateur reinsman, is 
a great judge of pace. Last- week Mr. Billings asked 
him to drive Lou Dillon a mile, and requested that it 
be in about 2:10. The mile was exactly in that notch. 
Lou Dillon aod Major Delmar will be started for a 
cup at the Detroit meeting. They will probably not 
be asked to go better than 2:05 this early in the year. 



It looks as if this was to be another McKinney year. 
The harness racing season has not yet fairly opened, 
but he has Charlie T. 2:14}, Adam G 2:14}, the three- 
year-old Kenneth C. 2:17 and Delia McCarthy 2:20}, 
all new trotters to his credit, while his pacing son 
Zolock has reduced his record to 2:06, which is the 
fastest record of the year. Tidal Wave 2:09, one of 
the new 2:10 pacers, is out of a daughter of McKinney. 



Fourteen heats were trotted in 2:15 or better by six 
horses at Los Angeles last week. The fastest was the 
one In 2:10* by Ole In the first heat of the 2:11 trot, 
which reduced his mark just half a second. The 
horses that trotted these fast seconds were sired by 
Falrose, Silas Skinner, Gen. Beverley, Shadeland 
Onward, Zombro and McKinney. 



The State Fair harness races filled well and a high 
class meeting is sure to result. The track will be in 
order and tho probabilities are that it will be fast as 
it has been built by Mr. Allen the most expert track 
builder in America, and the soil is a mixture of clay 
and loam which he claims is just the thing for a fast 
and safe track for training and racing. 



Adam G. 2:14}, the seven-year-old McKinney gelding 
that won the $1000 2:24 class trot on the last day of 
the Los Angeles meeting, was bred by President E. 
P. Heald of the Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders 
Association. His dam is Professor Heald's favorite 
mare Nona Y. by Admiral, that is also the dam of 
the trotter Lady Rowena 2:18* and the pacers Nance 
O'Neil 2:09* and Charles David 2:15. Adam G is un- 
doubtedly one of the greatest prospects that has been 
seen on any of thetracks this year and it is confidently 
believed by the most experienced horsemen that three 
heats In 2:10 are not beyond his reach. 



Good looks, size and soundness are the qualities 
which the horses possess that are consigned to the 
sale at Chase's salesyard Monday evening July 24th, 
by the Occidental Land and Live Stock Association 
of Sharon, Cal. These horses are by Teheran, Ilderim 
and a Norman stallion. There are line roadsters and 
good express horses in the consignment. 



The free-for-all pace at the Fresno meeting next 
week has five entries as follows: Zolock 2:06, Edwin 
S 2:08, Tom Carneal 2:08*, Kelly Briggs 2:09', and 
Daedalion 2:10. This will be one of the greatest con- 
tests seen in California in years, and will be well worth 
a trip to Fresno to witness. As the Fresno track is in 
fine condition it is likely that the winner will reduce 
his record. 



Ambush, the brown colt by Zolock that took a 
record of 2:16 in the third heat of the 2:20 trot at Los 
Angeles is only three years old, yet in this race he 
was pitted against aged horses and got second money. 
Ambush took a record of 2:20 as a two-year-old last 
year. He looks like one of the best prospects in Cali- 
fornia at the present time for a record of 2:10 as 
a four-year-old. 

Most of the Importers who have been active of late 
years and several who have not are at present in 
Europe, buying stallions for the American trade and 
the general opinion is that if the horses can be bought 
more will be imported this season than ever before in 
any one year. It is believed that many more Shires, 
Clydesdales and Suffolks will be brought over this 
year than since the lite eighties. 



Good horses are hard to get at the present time, but 
a number of good ones will be sold by auction at the 
Fred H. Chase & Co. 's salesyard, 1732 Market street, 
San FraDcisco, on Monday evening July 24th. They 
are consigned to the Occidental Land and Improve- 
ment Company, of Sharon, Cal., and the C. E. Need- 
ham farm at Bellota, Cal. Don't forget this sale if 
you want a good horse or several of them. 



To make a bran mash first wash out a bucket with 
boiling water, then pour in the quantity required — 
say three pints — and stir in three pounds of bran. 
Cover up and leave it for a couple of hours or more if 
not required for immediate use, says American Culti- 
vator A mash takes hours to get cold and is often 
offered to a sick horse too hot and refused when it 
would have been taken if properly prepared and given 
warm instead of scalding. 



Will Durfee was the largest winner at the Los 
Angeles meeting. He won two races, was second once, 
third once and fourth once, the total winnings being 
$1440. Walter Maben was next with $1350 to his credit 
and Fred Ward was third with $1250. The others win- 
ning $500 and over were F. E. Wright $1140, S. Lindsay 
$1000, John Quinn $1000, Fred Chadbourne $800, M. 
Reams $750, Al McDonald $750, S. E. Kent $750, J R. 
Springer $650, W. Zibbell $650, Henry Delaney $575, 
Leggett $550, Stewart $550, Freeman $500. 



Last year a very large number of draught stallions 
were brought to this State from the East and were 
distributed throughout the counties where horse 
breeding is carried on to any extent. Nearly all these 
stallions that have made seasons here this season have 
been liberally patronized and for that reason the sup- 
ply of grade draught horses which is now very short 
on the Coast should begin to reach something neaier 
the demand at the end of the next five years. Until 
that time, however, the supply will be short, and 
horses of 1300 pounds and upwards will be held at 
high figures and find a very ready sale in California. 



Zombro 2:11 by McKinney is getting a lot of high 
class mares in Oregon this year. Among the record 
mares that have been bred to him since his arrival at 
Portland on June 1st, are Sarah S 2:09i, Flora G. 
2:21, Mary Scott 2:24, May Tilden 2:24}. Lady Mack 
2:214, Loveless 2:20, Alto Dell 2:10* and Altelno 2:21*, 
Bessie Loveless, two year-old trial 2:24, Beulah, two- 
year-old record 2:47, own sister to Chehalis 2:04}. 
Lany Dell, dam of Bettie Gentry 2:16*. Pocahontas, 
dam of Little Maid 2:18, Bridesmaid, dam of Edmond 
S., trial 2:17} and other highly bred and producing 
mares have also been sent to Zombro's court during 
the past month. 

Harry Bush, the capable young trainer who gave 
Confionzaher mark of 2:12} last month at Denver, Is 
receiving many complimentary notices in the press. 
He isa natural horseman, and has that rare faculty of 
gaining not only the confidence but the control of 
highly nervous and erratic horses. He went to Colo- 
rado from De8 Moines, Iowa, a few years ago in search 
of health, and although he Is much more robust thao 
he was, his voice cannot be raised above a wh'sper 
and his lungs are very weak. Confienza was declared 
a hopeless failure before he began training her, but 
he has made a valuable racing machine of the daugh- 
ter of James Madison. 



The brown trotting mare Italia by Zombro, owned 
by Mr. W. P. Murray of Cleveland, is working better 
this spring than ever before. She is stronger, looks 
better, does not show any disposition to be unsteady, 
and in every way her rest last year has done her good. 
She will probably be raced later if she continues to 
Improve. Mr. Murray's young trotter, Russell G. by 
Nutwood Wilkes 2:16}, dam by California Nutwood, 
second dam by Anteeo and third dam by Venture, is 
learning fast and bids fair to develop Into a useful 
trotter. Russell G has a full sister In California, who 
as a two-year-old last year worked a mile in 2:24}, 
with a quarter In 33 seconds. She is a very fast filly, 
and is heavily staked. The dam of RuBsell G , It is 
said, never failed to produce speed, as all her colts by 
Nutwood Wilkes are fast. — American Sportsman. 



6 



[July 15, 1905 



STATF FAIR ENTRIES. 



The 1 ist of entries to the harness races 
advertised for the State Fair of this 
year, which is printed herewith, is a 
remarkably good one. All the fastest 
trotters and pacers in California have 
been na r ed and excellent racing can be 
expected for the meeting which will 
opan Saturday, September 2d. 

•4:09 Clans I'aclug. 8800— 18 Entries. 

A OUinger's b h Daedalion. 

Joe Long's br m Nellie R. 

J B Springer's ch m Miss Idaho. 

P H Lichtenstein's b m Nance O'Neill. 

T W Barstow's br m Alone. 

B M Turner's b g Vision. 

E Gravatt's b s Jonesa Basler. 

Gus La Fountaine's b g Hassalo. 

L B Lindsay's b g Le Roi 

W G Durfee's br m Rita H. 

F E Wright's br g Kelly Briggs. 

I C Mosher's ch s Tidal Wave. 

8:15 Class Trottlug, S700— 9 I nines 

A Oitlnger's b g Zimbra. 
J W Zibb3ll's b h AdamG. 
A L McDonald's blk g Charlie T. 
J A Jones' blk m Lady Jones. 
S Siljan's br g Birdcatcber. 
F J Ruhstaller's br g Wild Bell. 
L B Lindsay's ch g Satin Royal. 
W G> Durfee's br g Cuate. 
I. C. Mosher's b m Oma A. 



8:13 Class Pacing, *600— 9 Entries. 

Mrs Jane Mastin's br s John A. 
E D Dudley's br m Friskarina. 
M R Duffy's ch g Core Cread. 
I L Borden's b h Cre6co Wilkes. 
J D Springer's b g Argyle. 
F R Lichtenstein's b m Hattie Croner. 
Fred Chadbourne's ch a John R Con- 
way. 

Jas Stewart's b a Fearnot. 
L B Lindsay's b m Queen B. 

8:18 Class Trotting, 8700— 11 Entries. 

W W Mendenhall's gr g What Is It. 

F E Ward's b m Lady Madison. 

J Groom's b g Liege. 

J B Iverson's b m Princess. 

J EI Bennett's ch g Dr Hammond. 

L B Lindsay's b h TheCommonwealth. 

W G Durfee's b g Jupiter B. 

A B Rodman's ch g Pat Rose. 

I C Mosher's ch g Rod Skin. 

H A Bell's b g H D B. 

L W Pfeiffer's br g Walter Wilkes. 

2:80 Class Pacing, MOO— 14 Entries, 

M J Ream's ch m Miss Winn. 
M R Duffey's dun s Eagle Pilot. 
James Fox's b m Lady Shamrock. 
Ray Dittus' b g Instructor. 
J C Berry's b m Clara L. 
C H Widemaon's blk g Joe Robin. 
Jas Edginpton's gr m Flora G. 
F Gommet's b h Little Jib. 
J W Offutt's rn m Mildred O. 
M Argy'a ch m Loganette. 



Jas Stewart's b s Fearnot. 
W G Durfee's blk m Bessie Barnes. 
Harry Lichtenstein's b m Dot. 
Humphrey & Briggs' b g Little Joe. 
8:30 Class Trotting, »600— 6 Entries. 

M J Ream's b g Oro Belmont. 
L C Gates' b m Dew Drop. 
Alex Brown's b g La Correcta. 
O E Williams' b g Wilmar. 
S Siljan's br g Birdcatcher. 
L B Lindsay's ch g Sam Bowers. 

Claiming Race for 2:86 Class Pacers, 8500. 

Did not fill. 

Occident-Stanford Pace. 

T W Barstow's b f Just It. 

2:18 Class Trotting. 8600— 6 Entries. 

J C Wallace's Old Hickory. 
F J Ruhstaller's b g Wild Bell. 
Jas A Smith's b g Hank. 
J A Jones b m Lady Jones. 
W G Durfee's b g Cuate. 
Henry Peters' b m Little Babe. 

Claiming Race for 2:27 Trotters, OGOO. 

Did not fill. 

2:18 Class Pacing, 80OO— 5 Entries. 

J C Berry's b m Clara L 

C H Widemann's blk g Joe Robin. 

F H Lichtenstein's b g El Morino. 

W. Mastin's b g Penrose. 

Jas Smith's gr m Sweet Heart 

Free-for all Trotting, 0800— 9 Entries. 

A L McDonald's blk g Charley T. 



W W Mendenhall's gr g What Is It. 

J Groom's b g Liege. 

J B Iverson's b m Princess. 

J H Bennett's ch g Dr Hammond. 

W G Durfee's b s Petigru. 

A B Rodman's ch g Pat Rose. 

H A Bell's bgHDB. 

J W Zibbell's b h Adam G. 

2:25 Class Pacing, S1500— 13 Entries. 

M J Reams' ch m Miss Winn. 

W R D jffey's dun a Eagle Pilot. 

James Fox's b m Lady Shamrock. 

Geo T Algeo's b h Mixer. 

J D Springer's b g Argyle. 

F Gommet's b h Little Jib. 

F H Lichtenstein's b m Hattie Croner. 

E A Servis' rn g Dr J 

M Argy's 8 m Loganette. 

Jas. Stewart's b s Fearnot. 

A L Jacobs' b g Arthur F. 

Humphrey & Briggs' b g Little Joe 

W G Durfee's b m Bessie Barnes. 

Free-For-All Pacing, S80O. 

Did not fill. 

2:84 Trotting, S1500-8 Entries. 

M J Reams' b g Oro Belmont. 
M C Delano's b m Ramona B. 
J A Jones' blk m Lady Jones. 
A E Williams' h g Wilmar. 
S Siljan's br g Birdcatcher. 
F J Ruhstaller's brg Billy Dooley. 
L B Lindsay's ch g Sam Bowers. 
Henry Peters' blk m Little Babe. 



Additional Purses for Fresno Meeting. 

The following additional purses for the Fresno 
meeting were advortised to close July 10th and de- 
clared filled by the Directors of the Breeders Associa- 
tion this week: 

Three-Year-Old Trotting, Geo. L. Warlow Stakes, 9400. 

Jas Ervin names Priscilla J, b m by Bonner N B- 
dam by Jerome Eddy. 

Bunnell & Prescott name Ambush, br c by Zolock- 
May Kinney by Silkwood. 

Martin Carter names Elma S, b f by Nutwood 
Wilkes-Bessle C by California Nutwood. 

Geo L Warlow names Athasham, br c by Athadon- 
Flora Wickersham by Junio. 

S K Trefry names Kenneth C, blk c by McKinney- 
Mountaln Maid by Cresco. 

Three-Tear-Old Pacing, Sunny Side Stakes, 8400. 

• F E Wright names Deviletta, b f by Diablo-Clara H 
by Hank. 

M J Reams names Memonlo, b m by Demonio-May 
Norris by Norris. 

I L Borden names Roberta, blk m by Robert I- 
Allie Cresco by Cresco. 

J W Marshall names Mona Wilkes, b f by Demonio- 
Trix by Director. 

Ben Davies names Delilah, b m by Zolock-Gipsy by 
Gov Booth. 

8:88 Class Trotting, iirand Central Hotel Stakes 0600. 

L B Lindsey names Sam Bowers, ch g by Joseph 
Simpson-Lid y Thorne by Hambletonian Mambrino. 

J A Jones names Lady Jones, blk m by Capt Jones- 
dam by Director. 

Jos Long names Wilmar, b h by Wildnut-Sweet 
Water by Stamboul. 

F J Ruhstaller names Billy Dooley, b g by Bay Bird- 
Maggie O by Cornelius. 

Ray Bennett namesOro Belmont, b g by Oro Wilkes- 
Muscovia by Belmont. 

Henry Delaney names Miss Mabel, b m by Thomp- 
son-Miss Tiffany by Gibraltar. 

Oentlemen's Roadsters— Free-for-All, Local Pacers, Purse 
8200, Entrance Free, 

E R Reed names Elmont, b g by Almont. 
E T Stockdale names Selda, b m by Stormy John. 
D L Bachant names George, b g by Loeber. 
Joe Cory names Mabel C, blk m by Strathway. 
Pat Sweeny names Lady R, b m by Col K R. 



should then pains should be taken to furnish the 
forage necessary. 

Some breeders do not appear to realize that a mare 
and her colt, idle in the pastures as they are, demand 
a great deal of good food. A mature workhorse can 
get along comfortably with less than a mare in foal, 
yet many breeders seem to think that meager pastur- 
age will furnish all the food necessary. This was 
called forcibly to mind recently when, in the course 
of a discussion on a somewhat prominent stallion, a 
remark was made to the effect that many of his foals 
in his new home were small, scrubby things, which 
would never serve to advertise their sire, great speed 
getter though he has been. In reply the statement 
was made that it was not to be wondered at that the 
new owner was prone to turn his colts and mares into 
a pasture that could not possibly supply all the sus- 
tenance necessary. Other breeders with sires of less 
speed making ability have been extensively patron- 
ized because their colts have invariably looked good 
and when raced have had the size and constitution so 
essential to a race horse. Colts which have been 
stunted by starvation cannot stand the strain of hard 
training and are sure to develop a weak spot when 
the work becomes too hard. If it is worth while to 
invest thousands in a breeding establishment it is 
very essential ihat the food supply should be suf- 
ficient and if the farm will not fut nish It then a few 
hundred dollars should be expended in its purchase. 
It is the few hundreds so spent that will make the 
many thousands a successful investment. 



Common Sense in Colt Breeding. 

With all the theories on breeding there is nothing 
that will assist in the raising of great colts so much as 
a fair amount of common sense. This holds good, 
especially In regard to the raising of colts both before 
and after being foaled, says The Horseman. It hardly 
seems possible that a man after investing thousands 
of dollars in stallions and broodmares would allow the 
young colts to starve, and yet, unfortunately, more 
than one instance can be cited where promising colts 
have been stunted and ruined because of stinginess in 
providing feed for the mare and for the colt after 
w"eaning. Possibly no breeder would admit that he 
ever pursued such a foolish policy, yet in such 
instances it must be admitted that the breeder has 
very little common sense in bis makeup. It is too 
often t-he case that a mare and her foal are turned out 
at this time of the year and allowed to run in the 
pasture until fall, between now and that time, it is 
safe to say, the pasture will not furnish the nourish- 
ment needed, either for the mare or her foal. Special 
care should be taken to see that both are provided with 
plenty of succulent and nourishing feed. Possibly the 
pasture wfll appear sufficient, but if the mare com- 
mences to get thin and the colt does not thrive as he 



Answers to Correspondents. 

F. Cadman, Elmira, Cal.— Square Dealer 3552 was 
a bay horse, foaled 1881. He was sired by Knicker- 
bocker 200, dam Maggie by Magnolia 08, grandam by 
Seeley's Black Hawk, a son of Long Island Black 
Hawk 24, great grandam by Bertrand, thoroughbred. 
Knickerbocker200 was a son of Hambletonian 10, dam 
Lad j Patchen by Geo. M. Patchen 30. Square Dealer 
sired Dimple 2:29} and Utell 2:24J. He has two pro- 
ducing sons and two producing daughters. We cannot 
find any reference to a horse by the name of Young 
Morgan Empire, either in the Year Book, Register, 
or in Battel's Morgan Horse Register. There was a 
horse called Young Morgan Emperor however. He 
was by Emperor, Bon of Bulrush Morgan. 



Friskarina Not Distanced. 



In the summary of the 2:13 pace at Los Angeles, 
printed in the BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN last week, 
Friskarina was accounted as distanced in the fourth 
heat. This was a mistake. Mr. E. D. Dudley of 
Dixon, owner of the mare, writes us that Friskarina 
was withdrawn after the third heat by permission of 
the judges as she was sick and in no condition to racei 



See This. 



Choice cattle and alfalfa ranch, 480 acres, 150 pro- 
ducing alfalfa; fine herd Jersey cows; dairy outfit; 
150 hogs; two large electric pumping plants; nine 
million gallons water daily. Main line Santa Fe, 
close to Bakersheld. Easy terms. Will consider ex- 
change. Address J. C. Arnold, Berkeley, Cal. * 



Strikel — if they don't give you Jackson's Napa Soda 
wber you ask for it. 



Thinks Highly ot George G. 

[Hawley in Ky. Stock Famn.J 
The present condition of the horses in Ed Geers' 
stable clearly refute the idea so frequently ad vanced 
by trainers that it is impossible to prepare for an ex 
tensive campaign the horses in their charge before 
the middle of the summer, for the cracks that he is 
now ready to do battle with have been on edge for 
some time and could easily have begun their campaign 
some weeks ago. Whatever may be the public per- 
formances of the several high class and greatly 
heralded trotters and pacers which this great reins- 
man will show to the public remains to be seen, for 
both Walter Direct and George G. are in a measure 
unknown quantities. It is true George G. has been 
seen in public, but it is not all safe to gauge his 
capacity by his past performances, for every one 
knows that he is today so vastly improved in mac- 
ners as to be quite a different horse from formerly. 

His 6peed has always been unquestioned, and no 
one familiar with him can doubt for a minute that he 
is a game trotter, and If his capacity can be judged 
by the manner in which he has taken his work this 
spring, he is destined to be one of the stars of the 
year. In view of the fact that he has not in the past 
performed creditably to himself, it would be folly to 
predict for him a campaign equal to that of Sweet 
Marie, for this mare is one among a thousand, but as 
it has always been conceded that all the gelding 
lacked was good behavior, and this he seems now to 
have in abundance, it is reasonable to suppose that 
the son of Homeward is now as near perfection as the 
skill of his trainer can make him. 

Granted that George G. is a 2:05 trotter, and surely 
his past performances justify this belief, and conced- 
ing his absolute gimsnass, there is little speculation 
in pronouncing him a trotter of the very first class, 
and as such likely to more than hold his own in any 
company he may meet. Whether or not he can over- 
come the cracks of the faster division will have to be 
aacerta'ned when he is put to that test, but that he is 
master of his own division there seems so belittle 
doubt. Everyone who has seen George G. and is 
familiar with his speed, his way of going and bis gen- 
eral make-up has been led to believe that there was 
in him capacity of the highest order; in fact, there s 
so much about him to indicate that he was a cham- 
pion that many of the shrewdest horsemen in America 
believe him capable of joining the ranksof the faetest 
division in the very near future. 

I firmly believe that this gelding will sweep every, 
thing before him this year, unless, of course, it is 
decided to undertake the impossible with him, and I 
have such a high regard for the judgment of his 
trainer, whose opinion of him Is of the highest, that 
nothing the gelding might do would surprise me. 
Geera has been forced to wait some time with a horse 
that is very nearly cherry ripe, yet so skillful is he in 
keeping a fast horse in perfect condition that there is 
no danger of this trotter having been overdone. His 
engagements should be at his mercy, unless, of course, 
he returns to his bad habits of the past, and after 
defeating the best of his own division, he can be 
expected to meet either Tiverton, Sweet Marie or 
both. I am firmly of the belief that if George G. is 
this year capable of a mile in 2:05, he will overcome 
Tiverton, if the two ever meet, for he is much more 
substantially put together, bas infinately more sub- 
stance, and should be capable of an extended cam- 
paign, something that is likely to be the undoing of 
light, waspish son of Galileo Rex, 



JULY 15, 1905 1 



The Attraction of Harness Racing. 

The harness racing season may be said to bave been 
fiirly begun, although thus far it has been confined 
mainly to the half-mile tracks, and the results of the 
different meetings, as reported in the columns of the 
turf press, in sbarp contrast to those on the running 
tracks, are as eagerly scanned by men interested in 
breeding as by those interested from a racing view- 
point. In no respect is the difference between harness 
racing and running racing more clearly shown than 
by this eager interest shown in racing results by those 
who take no more active part in racing than is shown 
by going to the races as spectators merely. It is 
likely true that 90 per cent of those who go to the 
running races go to speculate, while at the average 
Grand Circuit meeting it is doubtful if more than 20 
percenjof those present take a part in the specula- 
tive part of the game. The attendanceat the average 
harness racing meeting is made up largely or persons 
coming under the following heads: Those who love a 
driving horse possessing some speed and who have 
become interested in professional racing through this 
love of speed so engendered; those who have made a 
study of trotting horse pedigrees and who are engaged 
in breeding to a greater or less extent; those who love 
horses naturally and who have been firm adhorents 
of the harness branch of racing from childhood up. 
There are, of course, those who love to speculate and 
who, through preference, prefer to back their judg- 
ment of harness horse9 mainly because they have 
always fancied horses of this kind, and have made a 
study of them and the conditions under which they 
are raced, but, as before stated, it is seldom that this 
element amounts to more than 20 per cent of the en- 
tire attendance. Harness racing attracts more people 
for sport's sake than any other form of racing be- 
cause, in a modified form, the amateur reinsman may 
participate in it, and thus he becomes interested in it 
in a professional way. The runner is a racing ma- 
chine, nothing else, while the trotter or pacer is not 
only a race horse in a professional way, but is also a 
source of enjoyment to tbe amateur who may make 
use of his speed in amateur events. He thus learns to 
know the feelings and motives which inspire the pro- 
fessional driver, sees in his endeavors to win that 
which he can neither see nor understand in the mite 
of a jockey clinging to a runner's back. He appre- 
ciates the skill and judgment shown by the men who 
have who have worked up to the front rank of train- 
ers and drivers, and an afternoon's racing gives him 
such actual pleasure as few devotees of the running 
turf ever realize. The two branches of racing are 
widely different and the gulf that separates them will 
never be narrowed. Running is the sport of those 
who delight in speculation, no matter what form it 
may take, while harness racing is the sport of those 
who have an undying love for horses and who delight 
in seeing them reach the highest state of perfection 
as illustrated by the modern type of the trotter or 
p aC er— a horse of beauty, intelligence and speed, use- 
ful not only as a racing machine but as a pleasureable 
companion as well. — Horse World. 



"Driftwood" Sees Mack Mack and Morosco. 

[Buffalo Horse World.] 

Well I have seen Mack Mack 2:12J, the son of the 
great McKinney 2:11$, dam Nancy by General Mc- 
Clellan, and the impression I had formed of him before 
seeing him was not overdrawn. He certainly is one 
of the grandest looking trotting geldings I have ever 
seen. Like all the McKinneys, he is a very dar k bay, 
in fact he could be called brown, he is eight years old, 
stands full 16 hands high and will weigh from 1250 to 
1300 pounds, when out of training and will weigh 
right at 1200 now. There is not a blemish of any kind 
visible on him. There are some things about him 
that would remind one of Sweet Mario 2:04$-. One is 
the expression about the head and another is his way 
of going, but there the resemblance ceases. He is 
longer in the back, which drops to quite a noticeable 
extent and reminds one of a stallion, along in years, 
that had done much stud service. He is high over 
the withers and across the coupling, which is well 
back, showing theMambrino Patchen characteristics 
in this particular. He wears a nine-ounce shoo for- 
ward, with two-ounce toe-weights and seven-ounce 
shoes behind. The boots he wears are moro for safety's 
sake than for the need of them, consisting only of 
quarter boots forward and shin boots behind. It is 
only when one steps behind him that his wonderful 
driving power reveals itself to the critic. He has 
quarters like a cart horse and stifles to match and the 
secret of his ability as a racing machine is at once un- 
folded to the most unsophisticated of observers. 

His trainer and half-owner, Mr. Helman, says that 
in all he ha9 started twenty-eight times, twenty-six of 
these races be has won and in the other two he won 
second money. In speaking of him, his trainer says 



that he has not the electric turn of speed of Sweet 
Marie, a quarter in 30* seconds being the best he has 
driven him, and that he has never in his work or 
races been a mile faster than 2:10. He says that while 
he expects him to be a good horse, he by no means 
thinks him invincible in his class and will be content 
with a fair proportion of the money. His good man- 
ners will be worth two seconds to him in any race, his 
owner thinks, as one can place him just where he 
wants to and be sure of always finding him on the 
trot. There is no question as to what he will do and 
he will be certain to add another 2:10 performer to 
his sire's already long list. Mack Mack's best mile 
thus far this season wa9 2:14j here at Denver. He 
has not been asked to do much. He will be shipped 
from here to Liberty ville, 111., where his preparation 
will begin in earnest and then the eastern public will 
be abie to draw conclusions for themselves as to his 
ability. His first, great race will be in the Empire 
State $10,000 purse for 2:10 trotters at Buffalo the 
week of August "th. 

A horse that is second only in general interest to 
Mack Mack 2:12}, is Morosco 2:12, the fast son of Way- 
land W., and Lady Moor, by Grand Moor. I can safely 
say from the start, he can only be appreciated when 
in harness and in action. It is at such a time that one 
who knows something about trotters will begin to 
enthuse. At any other time he would never give one 
the impression that he is the really great trotter he is- 
He is a rakish looking horse and rough in his exterior 
appearance. A brown in color, full 16 hands high^ 
wears a nine-ounce shoe forward and a seven-ounce 
behind; quarter and shin boots forward and ankle and 
shin boots behind. He is a line trotter with full, 
round action forward going rather low behind, which 
gives to him a perfectly smooth gait and ea9y way of 
going for so large a horse He hits the ground very 
light and conveys to one the idea that he is one of the 
wear and tear kind. Before leaving California he 
worked a mile to his record, 2:12, but since his arrival 
at Denver he has not up to this date, June 26, beaten 
2:15. He is a horse that wants a free head and if given 
it, will not pull an ounce and can be plactd without 
trouble. In his races on the Coast it is said that he 
never made a start that he could not have won. How 
true this is I would not venture to say. Of one thing 
I fesl sure, the money he will race for this season will 
be enough to bring out his best efforts. He will start 
in some minor events but his first great race will be 
when he starts in the Empire State $10,000 purse for 
2:10 trotters at Buffalo next August at which time his 
true worth as a race horse will be brought to the 
surface. 



From West Australia. 

Mr. A. D. Whitecross, a resident of South Brisbane ) 
Queensland, Australia, who is one of the Breeder 
and Sportsm/.N'S regular readers, writes us that the 
harness horse is becoming more popular every day in 
that country and adds "We are getting a better class 
of trotters here by degrees thanks to importations of 
stallions from America. Our time however very 
seldom comes below 2:40, and a 2:30 horse would be a 
veritable whirlwind. All this is to saddle as we have 
no tracks fit to carry a sulky except our show tracki 
which are quarter mile circles. I have seen a mile in 
harness in 2:42, but the constant turning on a small 
circle is not conducive to fast driving. Fair sized 
horses of the trotting strain bring from $150 to $200 
for buggy horses. The leading breeder of this class 
of horses is Mr. John Stanfield, and his success in 
handling, working and showing to advantage ia 
largely due to the imformation contained in the 
Breeder and Sportsman and in Marvins book on 
the trotter which I obtained from him from your 
city." 

Mr. Whitecross in his letter requested the pro. 
prietor of the B. & S. to send him a few pounds of 
Kentucky blue grass seed which he intends sowing on 
the black soil upland ridges in his seation of the 
oountry. He states that they already have three or 
four species of blue grass growing there, and that it is 
splendid horso and cattle U'.ed. The seed will be sent 
Mr. Whitecross as asked for by the next steamer and 
we hope it will thrive and do well there. 

Computed Value by Measurements. 

An Arab mothod of ascertaining the value of a 
horse by his porportions is to measure him with the 
hand from tbe extremity of the dock to the middle of 
the withers, and take note of the number of palms. 
They then begin again from the middleof the withers 
to the extremity of the upper lip, passiDg between tho 
ears. If, in the two cases, the number of palms is 
equal, the horso will be good, but of ordinary speed. 
It the number of palms behind is greater than In front 
tbe horse will have no "go" in bim; but If the number 
of palms between tho withers and the extremity of 
the upper lip is more considerable than in measuring 
from the tail to the withers, rest assured the horse will 
have great qualities. 



State Fair News. 

The Directors of the State Agricultural Society have 
made a contract with Murcell & Smith for the con- 
struction of one hundred and four cattle stalls, fifty- 
two in a structure. 

Professor W. C. Carlyle, who has judged the live- 
stock at the Fair for several seasons, will not be able 
to serve this year, and President B. P. Rush has been 
instructed to engage a judge for that department. 

The poultry show is to be made an important 
feature of the State Fair again, and Secretary Albert 
Lindley will communicate with Henry Berrar, of San 
Jose, with a view of engaging his services as judge. 
Berrar has judged the poultry several years and has 
given satisfaction to exhibitors. 

It has been decided to olfer valuable prizes to Induce 
counties to make exhibits of their products. To this 
end the.society will otfer a premium of $500 for the 
best county exhibit; second. $250; third, $150; fourth, 
$100; fifth, $50. 

Resolutions of respect to the memory of Frank W. 
Covey, a former Director of the society, who died 
recently, were adopted at the meetingof the Directors 
last Saturday. 

The Pavilion will be turned over to tho Native Sons 
this year, and many Parlors will install exhibits of 
the products of their counties. The big prizes offered 
will make the competition keen for these prizes and 
the best county exhibits seen in years are expected. 
Admission will be free to the Pavilion during the 
entire week. 

Ban Placed on Pool Rooms. 

New York, July 12— The executive board of the 
Western Union Telegraph Company today adopted a 
re-olution recommending to the full board of directors 
that racing news be not supplied by the company ex- 
cept to persons receiving it through a regular office. 
The resolution is as follows: 

Whereas, This company, by an order issue.d by its 
president, has directed the cessation of the collection 
of horse race reports; and 

Whereas, It is claimed that the distribution of 
horse race reports still continues notwithstanding the 
action of this company referred to. 

Therefore, be it recommended to tbe board of 
directors that the offices of the Western Union Tele- 
graph Company be directed to cease the transmission 
of any message containing horse race reports, except 
when such messages are delivered to a regular office 
of the company for transmission to and delivery 
through a regular office of the company or for de- 
livery in such or other manner as the president of the 
company shall authorize over his signature. 

The meeting of the committee was short, and among 
those who attended were President Clowry, Russell 
Sage, Jacob H. Schiff and James H. Byde.. 

Horse Show Association Organized. 

As the result of the very successful horse show given 
by the Tournament of Roses Association at Pasadena 
last April, a new association has been organized called 
the Southern California Hor6e Show Association of 
Pasadena. It has been duly incorporated and pro- 
poses to give a show annually in March. The horses 
shown last April came from all over the United States 
and the owners were particularly pleased with the 
out door winter show, something they were not accus- 
tomed to in the East. So many Eastern people who 
winter in Southern California bring their horses with 
them that an exceptionally fine show can be held. 

The officers of the new organization are John S. 
Cravens, President; John B. Miller and Fred E.Wilcox 
of Pasadena, Walter S. Newhall of Los Angeles, 
Robert Lee Bettner of Riverside and W . J. Hogan of 
Louisville, Ky., Vice-Presidents; Edwin D. Neff of 
Riverside, Secretary and Treasurer. 

Not to Be Bred to Ben Liebes. 

An item in last week's Breeder and Sportsman 
stated that Grace Kaiser, the dam of Coney 2:02, etc., 
would be bred to Ben Liebes 2:174. This is an error. 
Grace Kaiser is now owned by Mr. James Coffin of 
this city. Sho has a beautiful filly at foot by Zolock 
2:06 that Mr. Coffin has refused $1000 for and has been 
bred back to Zolock. Grace Kaiser Is one of tbe 
greatest brood mares in the whole country. In addi- 
tion to Coney 2:02, she is tho dam of Stipulator 2:11}, 
and the trotters McZeus 2:13 and Grace McK. 2:21j|, 
and grandam of Tidal Wave 2:09. 

Lou Dillon Trotted in 2.06 Last Week. 

At the Cleveland track, last Saturday morning, Mr. 
Billings drove Lou Dillon a milo in 2:06, the fastest 
mile made this year by any trotter. After the work- 
out Mr. Billings said: 

"I did not extond the mare a bit. Had I done so 
she would have stepped the mile in two minutes at 
least. Lou made the first quarter in 33 seconds, the 
half In 1:04, the three-quarter in 1:35] and the mile 
in 2:06." 



8 



[July 15, 1906 



ROD, GUN AND KENNEL. 



Conducted by J. X. I>e WITT. 



Coming Events. 

Rod. 

April 1-Sopt. 10. Oot. 16-Feb. 1— Open season for taking stoel- 
iead In tidewater. 
April 1-Sept. 15— Closed season for lobsters and crawflsh. 
April 1-Nov. 1— Trim season open. 
June l-Jan. I— Open season for black bass. 

July 8— Saturday Fly-Casting Contest No. 8. Stow lako, 2:30 

p. m. 

July 9— Sunday Fly Casting Contest No. 8. Stow lake, 10 a. m 
Sept. 10-Oct. 16 -Close reason In tldewator for sleelbead. 
Sept. 10-Oct. 16— Clof j season (or catching salmon. 
Oct. 16-Nov. 15— Close season for taking salmon above tide, 
water. 

Nov. 1-Sept. 1— Open season for crabs. 

Nov. 15-Sept. 10— Season open for taking salmon above tide 
water. 



Feb. 15-Sept. 1— Closed season for mountain quail, grouse and 
jage ben. 

Feb. 15-Oct. 15— Closed season for quail, ducks, etc. 

April 1-Oct. 15— Close season for English snipe. 

June 27, 30— The Interstate Association's Grand American Han- 
dloap Target tournament, Indianapolis. Ind.; $1000 added money. 
Elmer E. Sbaner, Secretary-Manager, Pittsburg, Pa. 

July Washington Gun Club. Blue rocks. Kimball-Upson 

grounds, Sacramento. Cal. 

July 1-Feb. 15— Dove season open. 

July 13— California Wing Club. Live pigeons Ingleslde. 
July 16— Mount View Gun Club. Blue rocks. Mount View 
Cal. 

July 16— Union Gun Club. Blue rocks. Ingleslde. 
July 23-Fish and Game Gun Club Blue rocks. San Jose. 
July 30— Millwood Gun Club. Blue rocks. Mill Valley 
Junction. 
Aug 1-Oct. 15— Deer season open. 

Aug 6— Golden Gate Gun Club. Blue rocks. Ingleslde. 
Aug. 6— Blue Rock Gun Club. High-street grounds, Alameda. 
Aug. 29 30-Interstate Association tournameat. Blue rocks 
Denver. Col. 

Sept. 9, 10— Empire Gun Club. Merchandise shoot. Blue rocks 
Alameda Junction. 

Sept. It, 13, 14— Interstate shoot. Blue rocks. Ingleslde. Elmer 
E. Shaner. Manager. Pacific Coast Handicap under auspices of 
S. F Trapshooting Ass n., A. M. Shields, Secretary 

Sept. 30-Oct. 1— Two-day blue rock tournament. Biggs, Butte 
oounty. H. Haselbusch, manager. 

Sept. 30-Oot. 1— BlggsGunClub. Two-day blue rock tournament. 
B ggs, Cal. 

Bench Shows. 

Aug. 15, 18— Orange County Agricultural Society. Middletown^ 
N. Y. D. A. Morrison, Secretary. 

Aug. 23, 25— Rookland County Industrial Association, bench 
show in New York City. A. A. Vanderbllt, Secretary. 

Aug. 31-Sept 2— Newport Dog Show. Newport, R. I. Francis M. 
Ware, Secretary 

Sept. Stockton Kennel Club F. A. Goisea, Secretary, Stock- 

ton, Cal. 

Sept. 16— Englewood Kennel Club. Englewood. N. J. M. W 
Robinson, Secretary. 

Sept. 27, 28— Valley Fair Kennel Club. Brattleboro, Vt. 
Howard C. Rice, Secretary. 

Oct. 3, 6— Danbury Agricultural Society, Danbury, Conn. G. 
M. Rundle, Secretary. Jas. Mortimer, Superintendent. 

Nov. 15. 18-Boston Terrier Club Specialty Club. Boston. F. 
H. Osgood, Seoretary. 

Nov. 28-D>o. 1— Philadelphia Da? Show Association. Phila- 
delphia. J. Sergeant Price, Secretary. 

1906. 

Feb. 12, 15— Westminster Kennel Club. New York. Robt. V. 
McKlm, Secretary. 

Feb. 20, 23— New England Kennel Club Boston. Wm. B. 
Emery, Secretary. 

March ", 10— Duquesne Kennel Club. Pittsburg, Pa. F. S. 
Steadman, Secretary. 

Field Trials. 

Aug. 15— Iowa Field Trial Club. Geo. C. Cooper, Secretary, P. 
O. Box 55, Des Moines, la. 

Aug. 23— North Dakota Field Trial Club. Inaugural trials 
Grand Forks, N. D. A. E. Palmer, Secretary, Grand Forks, S, D. 

Sept 4— Nebraska Field Trial Association. 4th annual trials. 
O'Neill, Neb. H. H. McCarthy, Secretary, O'Neill, Neb. 

Sept. 6— Manitoba Field Trial Club, 19tb annual trials. La 
Salle, Man. Eric Hamber, Secretary, Wlnnepeg Man. 

Sept. 21— British Columbia Field Trial Club, 3d annual trials- 
Ladner, BO H. S Rolston, Secretary, Vancouver B. C. 

Oct. li— Paciflo Northwest Field Trial Club. La Conner Flats, 
Wash. Chas. L. Lundy, Secretary, Seattle, Wash 

Oot. 23-Ohlo Field Trial Association Washington Court House, 
O C. T. Phillips, Secretary, Columbus, O. 

Oct. 30— American Field Futurity Stake. For Pointers and 
Setters whelped on or after January 1, 1904. whose dams have 
been duly qualified. Robinson, III , entries closed July 1. Address 
Am. Field Publishing Co.. Chicago. 

Oot. 31— Connecticut Field Trial Club. Hampton, Conn, F. M. 
Chapln, Secretary, Pine Meadow, Conn. 

Nov. 6— Independent Field Trial Association. Hutsonvllle. 111. 
S. H Socwell, Secretary, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Nov 13— Illinois Field Trial Association. Robinson, 111. Wm. 
R. Green, Secretary, Marshall, 111. 

Nov Indiana Field Trial Club, (Week following Illinois 

Champion Stake). C. F. Young. Secretary, Clay City, Ind. 

Nov. 21— International Field Trial Club. Ruthven, Ont. W. B. 
Walls, Honorary Secretary, Chatham, Ont. 

Dec. 2— Continental Field Trial Club, 11th annual trials, . 

John White, Seoretary, Hempstead, Long Island. 

Dec Pointer Club of Amerioa (following the Continental 

trials). Barber, N C. C. F. Lewis, Secretary, 126 Maiden Lane, 
New York. 

Deo. 12— Eastern Field Trial Club Waynesboro, Ga. S. C. 
Bradley, Secretary, Fairfield. Conn. 

1006. 

Jan Paciflo Coast Field Trials Club, 23d annual trials 

Bakersfleld, Cal. Albert Bqtz, Secretary, 201 Parrott Bldg., San 
Francisco. 



Pacific Coast Derby Entries. 



DATE OF OPEN OKI K SEASON. 

The open season for the killing of bucks begins 
August 1st, and not on July loth, as has been pub- 
lished frequently of late. The State Fish Commission 
desires that the exact date of the open season be 
given the widest publication, as the erroneous date of 
July 15th may ba the means of getting into trouble 
some who are disposed to respect the law. 



A total of forty-five nominations for the Coast field 
trials next January is the gratifying list of young 
dogs that are entered for the January Pacific Coast 
Derby stake. This entry is seven in excess of the list 
closed July 1, 1904 (22 English Setters and 17 Pointers). 

The entries which closed on the 1st inst. comprise 
28 English Setters, 1 Irish Setter and 17 Pointers. 
The class and quality of the Derby candidates is 
strongly demonstrated and comprises some of the best 
blood lines and crosses extant. 

For the first time in many years an Irish Setter has 
been entered for the running in the Pacific Coast 
trials. The breed is well worthy the attention of our 
sportsmen. Irish Setters are not by any means over- 
looked on the Coast, where conditions climatic and 
geographical are most favorable to bringing the 
mahogany boys up in the front ranks of our field dogs. 
We extend our congratulations to Mr. Piepers of Los 
Angelet and hope to see his Derby dog up with the 
winners for the Los Angeles kennels eontains some 
excellent and well bred Irish Setters. The entries, 
which closed July 1st, first forfeit $5; second forfeit $5 
payable November 1st and $10 additional for starters, 
are the following: 

ENGLISH SETTERS. 

B J. Baum's (San Francisco) orange and white 
dog Victor B. (Cavalier-Rod's Sylvia), whelped Jan. 

7, 1904. Owner, breeder. 

J W. Riplinger's (Seattle, Wash.) white and black 
bitch Cynthia (Ch. Stylish Sergeant-Ch. Pera), 
whelped July 22, 1904. Owner, breeder. 

H. A. Jones' (Eureka, Cal ) white, black and tan 
dog Montauk J. (Bruce-Juna H.), whelped April 10, 
1904. Owner, breeder. 

Jos. E. Terry 's (Sacramento) white and black bitch 

(Drake Windem-Mary Lou) whelped June 

18, 1904. Owner, breeder. 

Same owner's white and black bitch 

Same breeding. 

Same owner's white, black and tan bitch 

Same breeding. 

Same owner's white and orange bitch Bessie Morti- 
mer (Kilgariff-M aggie F.), whelp«.d April 3, 1904. P. 
D. Linville, breeder. 

Same owner's white and orange bitch Merry Duchess 
(Fairland Dude-Merry Hart), whelped July 30, 1904. 
Chas N. Post, Sacramento, breeder. 

Same owner's white and black bitch 

(Kilga riff-Belle of the Ball), whelped— 1904. H. S. 
Humphreys, Indianapolis, Ind., breeder. 

Hugh Hopkins' (Minturn, Cal.) chestnut and white 
bitch Aunt Mame (Uncle B. -Sport's Belle), whelped 
Jan. 3, 1904. H. R. Edwards, breeder. 

'3. Christenson's (San Francisco) black, white and 
tan dog Goliath (Kilgariff-Maggie F.), whelped April 
3, 1904. P. D. L'nvilie, breeder. 

Chas. N. Post's (Sacramento) blue and tan belton 
dog De Charney (Petrel's Count-Moxy Danstone), 
whelped Feb. 26, 1904. W. J. Baughn, Ridgevllle, 
Ind., breeder. 

Same owner's orange and white bitch Sunburst 
(Fairland Dude-Merry Heart), whelped July 30, 1904 
Owner, breeder. 

Same owner's white, black and tan bitch Light 
Heart. Same breeding. 

Dr. E. E. Stone's (Napa, Cal.) black, white and tan 
dog Narcisse (Fairland Dude-Merry Heart), whelped 
July 30, 1904. C. N. Post, breeder. 

Albert Betz (San Francisco) black, white and tan 
dog Merry Dude (Fairland Dude-Merry Heart), 
whelped July 30, 1904. C. N. Post, breeder. 

Mrs. C. E. Wilson's (Ross, Cal.) white, black and tan 
dog Encinal (Clipper W. -Rod's Sylvia) whelped Sept. 

8, 1904. Dr. C. E. Wilson, Ross, breeder. 

Same owner's white, black and tan dog Sour Jack, 
Same breeding. 

J. W. Considine's (Seattle, Wash.) blue belton bitch 
Miss Hap (Count Rowdy-Roxane), whelped Sept. 23, 
1904. Owner, breeder. 

J. W. Considine's white and black bitch Lady's 
Count Gladstone Jessie Rodfield Galore (Count 
Rowdy-Roxane), whelped Sept. 23, 1904. Owner, 
breeder. 

J.A.Peebles' (Seattle, Wash.) orange and white 
dog Kipling Whitestone (Count Whitestone-Count's 
May Belle), whelped May 17, 1904. White and Peebles 
Seattle, breeders. 

J. E. Lucas' (San Rafael) black, white and tan dog 
Uncle Dudley (Count Whitestone-Count's May Belle), 
whelped May 17, 1904. White and Peebles, breeders. 

W. W. Van Arsdale's (San Francisco) white and 
orange dog Mendocino (Uncle B. -Count's Gift), 
whelped Aug. 24, 1904. Owner, breeder. 

Same owner's white and orange bitch Madera. 
Same breeding. 

Same owner's white, black and tan bitch Wawona 
(McCloud Boy-Countess Mark), whelped May 18, 
1904. Owner, breeder. 

Sameowner's white and orange bitch Pima (McCloud 
Boy-Peach Mark II), whelped July 20, 1904. Owner, 
breeder. 

Same owner's white, black and tan bitch Calpella 
(Count's Mark-Shasta), whelped May 26, 1904. 
Owner, breeder. 

L. McDanlel's (Templeton, Cal.) white and lemon 



dog Cloud Light (Bonner N.-Whlte Wings), whelped 
Aug. 14, 1904. S. D. Merk, Paso Robles, breeder. 

IRISH SETTERS. 

Paul Piepers' (Los Angeles) red Irish Setter Lady 
Elcho II (Ch. Fred Elcho-Miss Lady Flnglass II) 
whelped April 25, 1904. Geo. E. Walter, Rushville' 
111., breeder. 

POINTERS. 

W. B Coutts' (Kenwood. Col.) liver and white dog 
Tod Sloan (Bolln's Duke-Whisper), whelped July 19 
1904. Owner, breeder. 

Same owner's liver and white dog James Wallace. 
Same breeding. 

W. W. Van Arsdale's white and live bitch Sonoma 
(Dr. Daniels-Babe Jingo), whelped January 13, 1905. 
Owner, breeder. 

F. H. Jermyn's (Scranton, Pa.) white and black 
dog Raffles (Ch. Senator P.-M.ss Rap), whelped Julv 
23, 1904. J. W. Flynn, San Francisco, breeder. 

John Erikson's (Seattle) white and black dog 
Senator's Jack (Ch. Senator P.-Miss Rap), whelped 
July 23, 1904. J. W. Flynn, breeder. 

J.W. Flynn's(San Francisco) black and white bitch 
May (Ch. Senator P.-Miss Rap), whelped July 23, 1904. 
Owner, breeder. 

Same owner's white and orange dog, Senator's Don 
(Ch. Senator P. -Flynn's Dolly Jingo), whelped May 
13, 1904. Owner, breeder. 

Same owner's white and lemon bitch Dollle. Same 
breeding. 

F. G. Schumacher's (Los Angeles) lemon and white 
bitch Lady Belle (Teddy Kent-Jack's Fashion), 
whelped May 20, 1904. W. J. Morris, Los Angeles, 
breeder. 

W. J. Morris' (Los Angeles) white liver and ticked 
bitch Navajo (Teddy Kent-Jack's Fashion), whelped 
May 20, 1904. Owner, breeder. 

StockdaleKennel8'(Bakersfield,M R. Dodge, Mana- 
ger) liver and white dog Combination Boy (Cuba Jr.- 
Bow's Daughter), whelped March 1, 1904. Owner, 
breeder. 

Same owner's liver and white dog Redwood (Ch. 
Cuba of Ksnwood-Petronella), whelped May 1, 1904. 
Owner, breeder. 

Same owner's liver and tan dog Oak wood. Same 
breeding. 

Same owner's white and liver dog Bay wood. Same 
breeding 

Same owner's liver and white bitch Cypresswood. 
Same breeding. 

C. E. Worden's (San Francisco; white and liver dog 
Hickorywood (Ch. Cuba of Kenwood-Petronella;, 
whelped May 1, 1904. Stockdale Kennels, breeder. 



Santa Cruz Show. 



The three day show, at Santa Cruz, last week of the 
Pacific Sheep Dog Club (formerly the Pacific Collie 
and Old English Sheep Dog Club) is reported to have 
been well patronized by fanciers and summer visitors 
at the ocean side town The show itself was a 
creditable one and deserving of success it being quite 
a novel undertaking to attempt a paying show at a 
resort so far from this city. The patronage and sup- 
port of Santa Clara and Santa Cruz counties fanciers 
was good. San Francisco was well represented by well 
known fanciers and a number of entries. The quality 
of the show, on an average, was far better than antici- 
pated by a number of the local fancy. 

Chas. Lyndon, late of Montreal, Canada, made his 
initial appearance as judge at a Coast show, his 
decisions were generally acceptable, although in 
several instances the awards met with criticism. The 
presentation of prizes last Saturday evening took on 
the phase of an exclusive social function, a large 
attendance of handsomely gowned ladies with their 
escorts being much interested in the affair. Miss 
Ethyl Hagar, of this city, In a very gracious and 
pleasing style presented the cups and trophies to the 
winners, Hugh McCracken making proper announce- 
ment as each winner appeared. 

The show was held in a large pavilion close by the 
beach. A feature of the show was the numerous 
entries made by the fair sex. During the show the 
'Frisco fancy was well represented. 

The officers of the club are P. W. Morse, President; 
Dr. H. C. Brown, Vice-President: Geo. W. Sill, Secre- 
tary-Treasurer; Irving Towneend, J. W. Baxter, Geo. 
Martin, Directors. Bench Show Committee, Chas. 
R. Harker, F. J. Torchiana 3rd, Geo. Martin, N.J 
Stewart. Dr. D. E. Graves, Veterinary; J. C. Berrett, 
Superintendent. 

The entries and number of dogs as shown In the 
catalogue are as follows: Great Danes, 5 entries, 4 
dogs. St. Bernards, 8-4 Deerhounds, 1-1. Grey- 
hounds, 3-3. Pointers, 8-9. English Setters, 11-9. 
Gordon Setters, 1-1. Irish Setters, 1-1 Field Spaniels, 
4-4. Cocker Spaniels, 34-23. Collie*, 30-24. Old 
English Sheep Dogs, 1-1. Bulldogs, 10-5. Bull Ter- 
riers, 4-4. French Bulldogs, 4-3. Boston Terriers, 
11-7. Airedales, 5-2. Fox Terriers, smooths, 11-7. 
Fox Terriers, wires, 8-5. Irish Terriers, 7-5. Skyes, 
2-2. Scottles, 1-1. Dalmatians, 1-1. English Toys, 
6-4. Japs, 1-1. Dachshundes, 4-3. Poms, 1-1. A 
total of i"3 entries and 125 dogs— enough for a two- 
point show. 

The two upsets of the show were when Sir David, 
the Cocker that won at a wholesale rate at the May 
show, was beaten by Bobble R. (Pittsburg Tommy- 
Mill Girl) owned and bred in San Jose, and also by Ch. 
Redllght for the Cocker Club special for best. The 
latter d!d not get a look In at 'Frisco. Rfdlight 
also beat Endcllffe Flash who took special for best 
at that show. Another jar to the fancy was the 
award for best to Mason's King over the Pointer 



July 15, 1906J 



6 



Boston. King was an exceedingly cowed actor in the 
ring, a habit we have frequently noticed in dogs that 
have been domiciled in the Woodlawn Kenaels. No 
less an authority than Mr. James Mortimer told us 
at. the 1904 show that Boston should go over King 
easily. We do not find King entered in the catalogue 
list. This dog is surely having a pottering time in 
reaching the championship mark, notwithstanding 
the cancellations of his wins last fall and the effort to 
annex the special at the May show this year — a pot 
house champion as it were. Collies and Cockers were 
the largest represented breeds and a good quality 
exhibit. Vern Tottie and Southport Philosopher 
were both absent. We are indebted to Mr. Mc- 
Cracken for the following list of wins: 

AWARDS. 

GREAT DANES— Puppy and winners dogs— 1 
Frank Schnitz' Prince F., 2 J. M. Struve's Levi C. 
Local dogs — 1 Levi C. Open and winners bitches — 1 
J L. Cunningham's Isabellita. 

ST. BERNARDS— Novice dogs— 1 Mrs. D. Ken- 
naugh's Czar, 2 A. S. Olney's Teddy Roosevelt, 3 
Miss A. McLaughlin's Bruno. Limit dogs— 1 Mrs. L. 
T. Hankies' King B. Open dogs— 1 Czar, 2 King B., 
3 Bruno. Local dogs — 1 Bruno. Winners dogs — 1 

SETTERS— Puppy dogs— 1 M. Perry's Dan. Novice 
dogs— 1C. L. Griffiith's Buck, 1 Mrs. E. H. Webb's 
Duke Mahoning. Local dogs — 1 Mrs J. G. Piratsky 's 
Dick Lee. Open dogs — 1 C. D Carman's Wad. Win- 
ners dogs — 1 Wad, res Buck. Puppy bitches — 1 A. J. 
Hogan's San Jose Belle. Novice and winners bitches 
—1 C. L. Griffiith's Feathers. Local bitches— 1 J. E. 
Willoughley 's Dixie. 

GORDON SETTERS— Puppy and winners dogs— 1 
Di\ J. J. Redmond's Jim. 

IRISH WATER SPANIELS— Open do^s— 1 Wm. 
Bay's Mike. Open bitches— 1 Wm. Bay's Rowdy Girl. 
Winners— 1 Mike, res Rowdy Girl. 

FIELD SPANIELS— Local dogs and bitches— 1 E. 

E. Kelly's Jolly, 2 Mrs. F. R. Walti's Teddy. Open 
and winners dogs and bitches — 1 Mrs. C. B. Ennor's 
Reymo. 

COCKER SPANIELS— Puppy dogs, any color— 1 

F. J. Ruh's Bobbie R, 2 W. N. Parrish'sMr. Lonjers, 
3 D. J. Sutton's Shifty, res Mrs. Thos. Murphy's 
Roman Punch. Novice dogs— 1 Bobbie R, 2 Mr. Lon- 
jers, 3 Caro Roma's Don Jose Local dogs, any 
color — I Mrs. M. Fredericksen's Taps, 2 Mrs. F H. 
Carr's Prince, 3 G. P. Byrne's Darkie. Limit dog9, 
black— 1 Bobbie R, 2 D. P. CreswelPs Sir David. Open 
dogs— 1 Sir David, 2 Mrs. C. M. Barker's Jeff. Win- 
ners dogs, black — 1 Bobbie R. res Sir David. Open dogs, 
any solid color other than black — 1 A. Wolfen's Ch. 
Redlight, 2 F. Budgett's Trixie. Open dogs, parti- 
colors — 1 Geo. S. Thomas' Endcliffe Flash. Winners 
dogs, other than black — 1 Ch. Redlight, res Endcliffe 
Flash. Puppy bitches, any color — J G. A. Neibor- 
gen's Creole Belle, 2 D. J. Sutton's Agawan. Novice 
bitches, black — 1 Creole Belle, 2 Mrs. D. W. Graves' 
Trotwood, 3 P. H Doble's Dolly Dainty, v h c W. H. 
Ames' Dixie, h c W. H. Hambly's Toto. Local 
bitches, any color — 1 Trotwood, 2 Mrs. A. C. Rennie's 
Fraud, 3 Dixie, res Mrs. M. E. Fredericksen's Lady 
Nell. Limit bitches, black — 1 A. L. Cresswell's Plu- 
raeria Sally, 2 Creole Belle, 3 P. H. Doble's Mill Girl. 
Open bitches, black — 1 Plumeria Sally, 2 Trotwood. 
Winners bitches, black — 1 Plumeria Sally, res Creole 
Belle. Open and winners bitches, any solid color 
other than black — 1 G. A. Nieborgen's Patience. 

COLLIES— Puppy dogs— 1 Wm. Ellery's Val Verdi 
Perfecto, 2 O. J. Albee's Elwynn Chriss. Novice 
dogs — 1 Hugh McCracken's Presidio Monarch, 2 Val 
Verdi Perfecto, 3 Elwynn Chriss. Local dogs — 1 G. 
P. Martin's Cheviot Laddie, 2 Miss A. Huiskamp's 
Chips, 3 J. D. Waite's Heather King. Open dogs, 
American bred — 1 Val Verdi Perfecto, 2 O. J. Albee's 
Ch. Ormskirk Emerald Jr. Open dogs, sable and 
white — 1 Val Verdi Perfecto, absent Wm. Ellery's 
Southport Perfection. Winners dogs — 1 Cheviot 
Laddie, res Presidio Monarch. Puppy bitches— 1 O. 
J. Albee's Ormskirk Bonnie, 2 Mrs. G. H Normand's 
Lassie, 3C. H. Brigg'a Kirkintulioch Lassie. Novice 
bitches — 1 O. J. Albee's Conqueror's Lucy, 2 Wm. 
Ellery's Val Verdi Rose. Local bitches — 1 Geo. J. 
Bancheral's Lassie, 2 Mrs. G. H. Normand's Lassie. 
Open hitches — 1 Hugh McCracken's Presidio Lassie, 
2 Val Verdi Rose, absent Vern Tottie, Ravenswood 
Pearl, Astrologer Grace. Winners bitches — 1 Orms- 
kirk Bonnie, res Presidio Lassie. 

OLD ENGLISH SHEEP DOGS— Open— 1 P. W. 
Morse's Shiela. 

DEER HOUNDS — Open— 1 J. A. Lally 's Daouil Roy. 

GREYHOUUDS— Open and winners dogs-1 T. 
Cooney's Sir Llpton. 

POINTERS— Puppy bitches— 1 E. Courtney Ford's 
Beauty. 

BULLDOGS— Puppy dogs— 1 F. Clark's Solano 
Mike. Novice dogs— 1 Solano Mike, 2 Mrs M. Mulli- 
gan's Dooley. Limit dogs — 1 Solano Mike. Open 
and winners dogs — 1 Phil C. Meyer's Endcliffe Baron, 
2 Solano Mike. Novice bitches— 1 F. F. Rodgers' 
Girtford Goody. Limit bitches — 1 Girtford Goody, 

2 Mrs. Charles R. Harker's Ivel Chaddie. Open 
bitches— 1 Girtford Goody. Winners bitches— 1 Girt- 
ford Goody, res Ivel Chaddie. 

BULL TERRIERS— Puppy dogs— 1 E Attridge's 
Edgecote Baron. Novice dogs— 1 W. Evans Dent's 
Milo. Open dogs — J. I. Sparrow's Croydon Czar. 
Winners dogs — 1 Edgecote Baron, res Croydon Czar. 
Limit, open and winners bitches — 1 Mrs. Chas. Reld 
Thorburn's Meg Merrilies II. 

FRENCH BULLDOGS— Novice dogs— 1 Mrs. H. R. 
Rand's Bully. Open dogs — 1 Sterling Postley's 
Vivace. Limit and open bitches — 1 C. G. Cook's 
Margot De Pantin. 

BOSTON TERRIERS— 1 PhilC. Meyer's Endcliffe 
Nobby Novico dogs — 1 Phil C. Meyer's Glenwood 
Patten, 2 Miss Ethyl Hagar's Nifty. Open dogs— 1 
G. S. Halllwell's BaysideChauncey, 2 Endcliffe Nobby, 

3 Nlftv. Winners dogs — 1 Bayside Chauncey, res 
Endcliffe Nobby. Novice bitches— 1 Phil C. Meyer's 
Glenwood Lady Bountiful, 2 A. M. Eaton's Tess. 
Limit bitches — 1 Tess. Open bitches — 1 Phil C. 



Meyer's Endcliffe Toby, 2 Tess. Winners bitches— 1 
Glenwood Lady Bountiful, res Endcliffe Toby. 

AIREDALE TERRIERS— Puppy, novice and local 
dogs and bitches — 1 G. P. Martin's Briardale Rose. 
Open and winners dogs and bitches — 1 Briardale Rose, 
2 A. C. Kuhne's Colne Zaza. 

FOX TERRIERS (smooth coated)— Novice dogs— 
1 H. G. Libbey's Pajaro Blizzard, 2 J. Leddy *s Bob, 3 
F. H. Chavarria's Don Jose. Local dogs— 1 Mrs. 
Montroyd Sharpe's Joie. Open dogs— 1 W. W. Stett- 
heimer's Tallac Chuck, 2 Pajaro Blizzard, 3 Bob. 
Winners dogs— 1 Tallac Chuck, res Pajaro Blizzard. 
Novice, open and winners bitches — 1, 2 J. Leddy'e 
Debbie, Trixie 

FOX T 
W. W. Stet 



AT THE TRAPS. 



At the California Winj Club shoot on the Inrle- 
side trap grounds Sunday some excellent shooting de- 
veloped during the regular club raco and events 
following. In the main shoot over 50 per cent of the 
participants shot at a distance of from 30 to 34 yards 
from the line of five traps. Out of the five straight 
scores three of the shooters shot at 30 and 31 yards, a 
decidedly clever bit of work with a 12 bore hammer- 
less. The straights were: Clarence A. Haight (20 
yards) A M -Shields (40 yards;, Dr. E. G. McConnell 
(31 yards), "Pete" Walsh (31 yards) and W. R Mur 




1 Mrs. - 

Marksman, 3 N H. Hickman's Mush. Local dogs— 1 craclc - w & 1 has been a bit off in form recently, shot 

Pajaronian Bristles. Open dogs, American bred— 1 _? m i_ Ji 4 ? a , m * rk - Even 
W. W. Stettheimer's Tallao Private. Open dogs— 1 



Ch. Humberstone Mearns, res 



I. C. Ackerman's 
Pajaronian Bristles 

IRISH TERRIERS— Open and winners dogs— 1 II. 
M. Papst's Irish, 2 Phil C. Meyer's Glenwood Mixer. 
Novice bitche9— 1 J. C. Berret's Tyrone Lass. Local 
and limit bitches— 1 F. J. Torchiana's 3rd Carlton 
Lonnie. Open and winners bitches — 1 K. M. Papst's 
Sweet Nell, 2 Carleton Lonnie. 

SKYE TERRIERS— Local entry— E. G. Haslaw's 
Travescoabsent. Open and winners dogsand bitches — 
1 PhilC. Meyer's Glenwood Waddles. 

DALMATIANS— Local dogs and bitches— 1 Miss 
Amy Morgan's Jessie. 

ENGLISH TOY SPANIELS— Local dogs and 
bitches— 1 Mrs. H. F. Anderson's Dorothy of Blen- 
heim, 2 Miss Alice Leland's Ethel Barry more. Open 
dogsand bitches — 1 I. C. Ackerman's Humberstone 
Trilby, 2 Dorothy of Blenheim, 3 Ethel Barrymore, 
res Mrs A A Roi's Pansy. Winners — 1 Humberstone 
Trilby, res Dorothy of Blenheim. 

JAPANESE SPANIELS-Novice dogs and bitches 
—1 Mrs. M. L. Woodruff's Tokio. 

DACHSHUNDE— Local dogs and bitches— 2 HA 
Kempf's Walti. Novice dogs and bitches— 1 Miss 
Ethyl Hager's Fritz. Open and winners dogs and 
bitches— 1 Fritz, 2 Mrs. Phil Wand's Ch Dougie E. 

POMERANIANS— Open dogs and bitches— 1 Mrs. 
N. J. Stewart's Atom of Chalecombe. 

SPECIAL AWARDS. 

Sweepstakes — Best in Show — Bulldog Girtford 
Goody. Best kennel, any breed, C. K. Harley cup, 
Phil C. Meyer's Glenwood Kennels. Best Terrier, any 
variety, W. W. Stettheimer cup. Best owned by a 
lady and best owned and shown by a lady, Bull 
Terrier Meg Merrilies II. Best from Santa Clara 
county, Airedale Briardale Rose. Best from Watson- 
ville, Collie Cheviot Laddie. Best Pointer or Setter 
from Santa Cruz county, Dick Lee. 

Best Great Dane, Isabellita. Best St. Bernard, Czar, 
Best St. Bernard from Santa Cruz, Bruno. Best 
Setter, E. Courtney Ford trophy, Gordon Setter Jim. 
Best Irish Water Spaniel, Mike Bud. Best Field 
Spaniel, Reymo. 

Best black Cocker Spaniel, Bobbie. Best, other 
than black, Ch. Redlight. Best bitch, any color, 
Plumeria Sally (black). California Cocker Club cup, 
members only, for best, Ch. Redlight. 

Best Collie, Arthur Letts' cup, Cheviot Laddie. 
Golden West Uollie Club trophy for best California 
bred, members only, Presidio Monarch. Wm. Ellery 
cup for best puppy, California bred, Ormskirk Bonnie. 
Best from Santa Cruz county. Cheviot Laddie. Best 
Pacific Coast bred dog, Cheviot Laddie. Best Coast 
bred bitch, O. J. Albee cup, Presidio Lassie. J. C. 
Berrett cup for best kennel O. J. Albee (Oakgrove 
Kennels). Cup for reserve dog In winners, Presidio 
Monarch. 

Best Bulldog, Girtford Goody. Best of opposite sex, 
Endcliffe Baron Best Bull Terrier, Meg Merrilies II. 
Best of opposite sex, Edgecote Baron. Best French 
Bulldog, Vivace. Beet Boston, President's cup, Bay- 
side Chauncey. Best owned by a lady, Nifty. Best 
Airedale, Mrs. J. P. Norman cup, Briardale Rose. 

Best smooth Fox Terrier, Tallac Marksman. Best 
wire haired Fox Terrier, Humberstone Mearns. Best 
from Santa Cruz county, Pajaronian Bristles. Best 
Dalmatian, Jessie. Best Toy Spaniel, Phil C. Meyer 
cup, Tokio. Best Dachshunde, Fritz, 



at this distance Nau- 
man d ropped nine pigeons, out of the eleven, with a 
single barrel. Helosthls fifth bird, an exceedingly 
difficult one at the distance. Otto Feudner (32 yards) 
allowed his sixth bird to fly back unharmed to the 
pigeon loft. Ten men altogether were In the eleven 
hole each losing one bird out of the allotted dozen 
W. J. Golcher (31 yards), while shooting in excellent 
form, got two baflllng flyers that spoiled his score 
sheet. 1 he pigeons supplied were strong ones and 
swift of wing, noth withstanding, the shooting in the 
club race accounted for all but just an even dozen 
which escaped out of the total bunch of 192 that were 
trapped. 

Following the club match a five-man team race at 
six birds took place. The Blues won with a total of 
^8 out of 30 birds. Nine men were in a side pool 
amounting to $22 50, eight of whom scored clean, 
and practically outshot them8elves from the money 
Feudner, Walsh, Dr. Bodkin and Frank Turner each 
scored straight in two following six-bird pools. 

The shooters in the foregoing races shot under the 
same handicaps which prevailed during the club 
match. 

The final race of the day was a miss and out pool in 
which five participants were engaged. The first round 
began at the 26 yard slat, each succeeding round, the 
shooters went back one yard until the 36 yard peg was 
reached. Sbields ; was the first man out, his fifth bird 
escaping at 31 yards; Donohae failed on his tenth, at 
34 yards rise. Haight's eleventh pigeon, sent him to 
the bench, after he had gone back to 36 yards. Three 
men, Nauman, Feudner and Walsh were the con- 
tenders now from the extreme limit distance. Each, 
shooting in excellent form accounted for an even 
dozen of birds— of these 36 pigeons, 16 were grassed 
with a single barrel. Pretty good work it was at the 
distance. Feudner and Walsh both lost their thir- 
teenth birds, dead out. Nauman stood on the score 
to close the round and got a lively "magpie" from No. 
3 trap. Both barrels gave the bird a heavy freight 
to carry, but the pigeon was strong, circling about 
several times and once dangerously near the arbiting 
fence, the bird finally lit off No. 1 trap, upstanding 
and alert. 

As clean a retrieve was made by Walsh as we ever 
saw. it was odds that the bird would fly, but Walsh 
has a crafty knack of his own in capturing a wounded 
birl, his skill did not fail this time, for he slowly and 
at times almost imperceptibly, got closer and closer 
until with a catlike grab the bird was in hand and 
Nauman thereby won the freeze out Each man then 
fhot out the fourteenth round, all killed. The scores 
in the different events were the following: 

Club match, 12 pigeons, distance handicap, $75 
added, five moneys — 

Wal ? h - , p J — 31 yds— il 111 11122 12-12 



Murdock, W. R 27" 

McConnell, Dr. E. Q 31 

Haight, C. A 29 ' 

Shields, A. M 30 ' 

Barker, Dr. A. M 88 ' 

"Slade" 28 ' 

Feudner, M. O .'. 32 1 

Donuhoe, E. 32 



Nauman. C. C 

Klevesahl, E 

Bekeart, Ptll B 

Turner, F 

Duzan, W. D 

Schultz, E 



34 

30 ' 
30 1 



26 

2» 

Golcher, W. J 31 

Five man team shoot, 6 pigeons, distance handicap, 
side pool, $2.50 entrance — 



-12222 12122 11—12 
-2*212 22222 11-12 
—22212 22222 22-12 
—22122 11122 12—12 
—1112 .' 0121 1 22—11 
—11111 22021 21—11 

— 11212 02222 22—11 
-02222 21111 21—11 

— 11210 11211 11 — 11 
-021 1 1 21211 12—11 
—22022 22222 22—11 

— II2I2 1 101 1 21 — 11 
-22221 20221 21-11 

— 11222 22202 22-11 
-12011 12120 12-10 



IN AND ODT OF CANADA. 

Pleasant news to many field trials devotees is the 
recent, ruling of the Canadian customs authorities at 
Manitoba to the effect that all dogs going to Manitoba 
for training, can be taken back across the line to take 
part in trials in the United States and then brought 
back to Manitoba to run in tho Manitoba trials. This 
courteous action of the officials is due mainly to the 
efforts of Mr. Eric Hamber. It is believed that so veral 
handlers, by reason of this arrangement, who will 
train their strings in Manitoba will now take part in 
the North Dakota and Iowa trials at Grand Forks. 



Blues 

Haight 222221—6 

Schultz, E 212222—6 

Murdock 212212—6 

Schultz, F 111112—6 

Feudner 120210—4 

* Birds only. 



Grays 

Walsh 111121-6 

Nauman 981111 — 6 

Donohoe 21 2222- li 

Shields 121221-6 

Turner 022201—1 

Bodkin, Dr* 221012-fi 



Wm. Bay's Irish Water Spaniel Ch. Rowdy Girl 
Asslnlboine Tim-Assiniboine Bodego) was served by 
W. F. Watson's Ch. Dennis C. (Ch. Mike C. -Biddy 
C.) This breeding should produce as fine a litter of 
Irish Water Spaniels as can be had anywhere in 
America. 

Mr. Graham Babcock had tho misfortune to lose 
Glenwood Fiancee last week. Fiancee was a winner at 
the 1904 show and a very good Boston She was, on 
Saturday, served by Roundsman and fifteen minutes 
after being placed In her kennel was found strangled, 
hanging suspended by her lead to a nail which the 
poor dog had accidentally caught her lead on. 

Wm. F. Wattson sold to Ed Donohoe a good-look- 
ing three months' old Irish Water Spaniel dog puppy 
by Ch. Dennis C. out of Kitty Kelly. 



Six bird pool, distance handicap — 

Feudner 222222- 6 Haight ' 0221 12— 6 

Walsh 121112-6 Donohoe ' 021 1*> I ■» 

Bodkin 112212-6 Murdock 0w 

Six bird pool, distance handicap- 
Turner 111111-6 Schultz 222012-5 

Nauman Ullll—6 Shields 2l0w 

Miss and out, pool — 

Feudner 21211 12211 22211 22221 1101—23 

Walsh 11112 11212 12121 21222 1101-23 

Haight 11112 12121 0w 

Nuuinan inn inn 21121 22221 2121-24 

Donohoe 21211 11210 w 

Shields 21210 w 



Sebastopol sportsmen have organized a gun club 
and have fitted up a trap shooting ground. The club 
started off with a list of fifteon members, shoots will 
take place every Sunday during the summer. 



Stockton, Oakland and San Mateo are, It is reported, 
to hold shows this fall. 



The Stockton Gun Club will smash blue rocks 
tomorrow, on the 16th inst. a livo bird shoot will tako 
place. 

The Petaluma Blue Rock Club shoot on the Fourth 
was well attended. Tho main event wasa"grab bag" 
shoot at 20 targets. The scores were: P. Murphy 
17, Summerfield 15, E. E. Drees 14, Jos. Clark 12, 
Chas. Vallier 12, O'Rourke 12, Henry Hall 12, Robt. 
Steltz 11, J. C. McLaughlin 10, Wm. Chapman 10, B. 



10 



[July 15, 1905 



Pendleton 10, A. Salmina 10, P. Salmina 9 G. Bod- 
well 9 Guy Beggs 9, B. Doss 9, Joe. Steiger 8, F. Car- 
ter 7, ' Dr Hall 7, B. Goodwin 7, M. Scott 7, George 
Brown 6, John Sullivan 4. • 

Bert Avers, M. H. Fredericks and M. Flohr also 
shot. The extreme heat of the day was a decided 
handicap on the shooters. 

The Martinez Gun Club held a shoot on the 2d inst. 

T TwrtTtaTgeVc. C. Gill 12, "L. C. Smith" 15, H. 
Knauft 14, J. Mayo 10, F. A. Hodapp ft, F. Knauft 14. 

Ten targets — F. A. Hodapp 9, L. C. Smith 6, V . 
KDauft 5, H. Knauft 9, C.C.Gill 8. 

Twenty targets-C.C.Gill 16, L^C Smith 
McNamara 13, F. Knauft 15, F. A Hodapp 13 

Ten targets-F. A. Hodapp L. C. Smith 9 
Knauft 7, H. Knauft 7, J. McNamara b, C. C. GUI 9 



San Francisco Fly-Casting Club. 

Saturday Contest No. 7, Stow Lake, July 8, 1905. Wind, 
west. Weather, floe. 



13, J. 



P. 



Events 


i 




-> 




a 






b 






C 






88 


n 


4-12 


86 






90 




88 






Wells, S. A 


101 


85 




88 


4- 


18 


90 10- 


12 


88 


7 IS 


8$.b 


Edwards. G O 


94 


M 


4-13 


88 






88 4- 




90 


8-li 


90 1 


MansHeld, W. D .. . 




88 


4-12 


88 


■i 


■12 


99 2- 




95 


9-12 


96.8 


Re Entry— 
























Brooks, Dr W. E... 




88 


4-12 


88 


4- 


IS 


88 4- 


12 


B8 


4-12 




Wells. S. A 


107" 






















Mansfield. W. D.. . 




94* 




100 






ion' ' ' 




98 


2-12 


93^6 



Sunday Contest No. 8. Stow Lake, July 9, 1905. Wind, 
south. Weather, fine. 

Events 12 3 4 



A blue rock shoot took place at the Claremon? 
Country Club, Oakland, on July 4th. Messrs. Cad- 
man, Smith and Havens drew lots for first prize; 
Havens was the lucky one. Five other handsome 
presents were won in the following order: Cadman, 
Smith, Gould, Koowles, McNear, Jr. 
The race was at 60 targets, handicap, the scores were: 

Handicap Broke Total 
46 
32 
18 



Cadman J. O ,j{ 

Gould, Charles B jJJ 

Rlckard, Toomas H 

Goodall, Edwin , *• 

Knowles, Harry JJ 

WordeD, Clinton E Jg 

Smith, Harry " 

MoNear. Jr , O. W f" 

Havens.Harold J" 

Prather, E. C 10 



20 
27 
20 
28 
IT 



Golcher. H C... 

Halght, F. M 

Everett, E 

Mansfle'.d, W. D.. 

Young, C G 

Huyck.Cbas 

KennifT, V. R 

Sperry. Austin. . . 

Reed F. H 

Kewell. C. H 

Brooks Dr. W. E. 

Re-entry— 
Mansfield W. D . 
Sperry, Austin . . 









a 




b 




C 




86 


4-12 


84 


8-12 


90 




98 


4-12 




88 


8-12 


88 




80 


2-12 


! 90 


7-12 




89 


8-12 


94 


8-13 


94 


2-12 


94 


5-12 .... 


94 


4-12 


96 




97 


8-12 


96 


9-12 


98.3 


92 


8-12 


93 


8-12 


91 


2-12 


93 


11-12 




87 




HI 


8-12 


86 


8-12 *9 


2-12 


67\8 


94 


8-12 


97 


8-12 


95 


10-12 96 


0-12 




86 


8-12 


88 




85 


10-12 


86 


11-12 


55 3 


86 


8-12 


94 


4-12 


98 


6-12 


98 


5-12 




93 




87 


8-12 


Sin 


10-12 


89 


3-12 


892 


98 


4-12 


98 


4-12 


83 


4-12 


M 


4-12 




87 




97 




85 


10-12 


96 


5-12 


98.1 


81 




81 






6-12 


84 


3-12| 62.2 



Walla Walla has secured the 1906 shoot of the 
Sportsmen's Association of the Northwest. This was 
decided at the annual meeting held before the close of 
the recent blue rock tournament. A committee con- 
sisting of W. F. Sheard, of Tacoma; E. E. Ellis, of 
Seattle; Tnomas B. Ware, of Spokane; P. J. Holohan, 
of Wallace, Idaho, and Maurice Abrams, of Portland, 
was appointed to draft a new constitution and by-laws 
to be presented for approval at the next annual meet- 
ing. One of the principal changes suggested is to 
permit outsiders to compete for money prizes. 

Following is a list of officers elected: President, H. 
H. Kershaw, of Walla Walla; vice-president, P. J. 
Holohan, Wallace, Idaho; second vice-president, W. 
F. Sheard, Tacoma; third vice-president, T. B. Ware, 
Spokane; fourth vice-president, Sam McDonald, 
Harrington, Wash. secretary, J. Smalls, Walla Walla; 
treasurer, J. C. Scott, Walla Walla; directors— H. O. 
Snell, Anaconda; Otto Feudner, San Francisco; dipt. 
Thompson, Vancouver, B.C.; A. P. Bigelow, Ogden, 
Ttah; Dr. H. C. Watkins, Hoquiam, Wash. 

The Sequoia Gun Club of Guerneville held its first 
shoot on the new club grounds on the 2d inst. 
The scores in ten target races were as follows: 



Event No 1, long distance, was nut «onte>ted Sunday, a tem- 
porary fence back of the casting platfoms making it impossible 
tor the members to properly handle their tackle. 

«-NOTE: Event 1— Distance Casting, feet. Event 2— Ac 
curaoy percentage. Event 3— Delicacy, (a) accuracy percentage 
(b) delicacy percentage; (c) net percentage. Event 4— Lure cast 
Ing, percentage. 
The fractions in lure casting are 15ths. 

STRIPED BASS CLUB DINNER 

A jolly gathering of anglers met at a down town 
restaurant Wednesday evening, the company present 
being members of the San Francisco Striped Bass 
Club. "Jim" Lynch presided as toastmaster. "Doc" 
Watts gave an entertainiDg description of a trip to 
the Big Meadows, H. C.Copeland spoke of the angling 
sport at Klamath Hot Springs. Frank Smyth ren- 
dered several pleasiDg baritone solos. The club will 
hold an "outing" at Lake Merritt on the 30th iDst. 
Among those present were: Jas. Lynch, Frank Smyth, 
Wm. Schad, H. Franzen, H. C. Copeland, W. C. 
Stevens, L. P. Daverkosen, Chas. H. Kewell, Bert 
Spring, N. E. Mead, Jas. Watt, W. Schmidt, W. H. 
McNaughton, Jr., O. D. Kelso. 



McGIll 8 

Triplett « 

Abtey ' 

Peugh ' 8 

Beirer 4 

Gorskl 4 

Lambert 3 

Wilson 2 

Klein 7 



SACRAMENTO RIVER FOULED WITH OIL. 

Early this week, from Keswick to a point many 
miles south of Redding, the surface of the Sacramento 
river was covered with a thin scum of crude petro- 
leum. This condition of the water was due to the 
heat prevailing at the Keswick smelter. A storage 
tank, containing 6000 gallons of fuel oil burst and 
emptied its contents into the river. Boating and 
bathing in the river was effectually stopped for the 
time being, the effect of the oil on trout and salmon, 
it is believed will seriously affect angliDg conditions. 



The Empire Gun Club held the final club shoot of 
the season at Alameda point on the 9th inst. There 
was a good attendance. The weather was perfect and 
good scores were the order of the day. One accident 
occurred to mar the pleasure of the day, but aside 
from that all had a very enjoyable time. 

Just at the close of the last event, we regret to state, 
the popular secretary of the club, J. B. Hauer, fell 
from the roof of the club house and sustained a very 
severe fractureof the left arm. Willing hands assisted 
him to the train and across the bay to the French 
Emergency Hospital. 

The following are the scores for the day in the dif- 
ferent events: 

Club championship race, 25 targets — Mastick 9, 
Mastick (back score) 8, Wm. Janssen 18, A. J. Webb 
24, Webb (back score) 24, 23, W. A. Sears 22, W. O. 
Cullen 22, J. B. Hauer 18. Bert Patrick 16, L. H. 
Allen 19, Fred Feudner 24, J. Peltiere 13. The highest 
average in this event was won by A.J.Webb with 
Fred Feudner second, W. A. Sears third, J. B. Hauer 
fourth and Wm. Janssen fifth. 

Monev match at 25 targets: First class— W. A. 
Sears, 20 yards, broke 22; A. J. Webb 22-19; F. 
Feudner 20-18; J. P Sweeney 16-18; W O. Cullen 18- 
16. Second class— Wm. Jansen 18-20; J. B. Hauer 20- 
20; L. H. Allen 18-13. Third class— Bert Patrick 18- 
16. Fourth class— Mastick 14-7. W. A. Sears having 
highest averages for the season in this event won first 
prize, a pair of gold sleeve buttons, and Fred Feudner 
second won a pair of silver sleeve buttons. 

Special handicap, cash prize race, 15 targets— W. 
O. Cullen, 18 yards, broke 12; W. A. Sears, 20-11; W. 
A. Sears (back score), 20-14; W. A. Sears (back score) 
20-10; A. J. Webb, 22-13; A. J. Webb (back score), 22- 
13; A. J. Webb (back score), 22-15; J. B. Hauer, 20-10; 
Iverson, 20-13; Iverson (back score), 20-14; Iverson 
(back score), 20-14; Wm. JansseD, 18-13: Wm. Janssen 
(back sco<-e), 18-12; Fred Feudner, 20-13; Fred Feud- 
ner(back score), 20-13; Fred Feudner (back score), 20- 
14; L. H. Allen, 18-11. Iverson and Webb tied for 
high average for the season in this event with Fred 
Feudner next up. 

In the Sweeney record medal race, A. J. Webb and 
Fred Feudner each scored 19 straight. In the shoot- 
off the medal was won by A. J. Webb. 



SANTA CRUZ STREAMS STOCKED. 

Game Warden Reed of Santa Cruz has stocked 
Corralitos creek, in the southern part of the county, 
with 25,000 steelhead and rainbow trout Tbe fish 
have been distributed in the tributaries in Brown 
valley and Hazel Dell. Twenty-five thousand were 
also turned loose today in Soquel creek. 



The biggest catch of the season was made at Santa 
Cruz a few days ago when in about a half a day's 
sport a party of New Yorkers, composed of William 
W.Tompkins, Miss Elsie E. Goodwin and C. S. du 
Mont, landed forty salmon, of which number eighteen 
were hooked by Miss Goodwin. The estimated weight 
of the fish was about a thousand pounds. 



Striped bass and also black bass are reported to be 
most abundant in French Camp, Walker, Ten Mile, 
Twelve Mile and Fourteen Mile sloughs — all being in 
the vicinity of Stockton. These tributary sloughs of 
the San Joaquin are at present apparently excellent 
feeding places for the fish. Many anglers have recently 
made good catches of large sized fish, of both varie- 
ties, in all of the sloughs where there weregood stages 
of water. 

DOVE SEASON, 

The open season for doves begins August first in the 
following counties: San Mateo, Santa Clara, Placer, 
San Joaquin, Yuba and Stanislaus. In Sacramento 
county tbe open season begins today. 



The Union Gun Club regular monthly shcot will 
take place at Ingleside tomorrow as usual. 



There will be a mustering of the Millwood Gun Club 
members at Mill Valley tomorrow forenoon when 
practice shooting will take place. 



REMEDY FOR THE RATTLERS BITE. 

Superintendent B. F. Daniel of the territorial prison 
of Arizona, tells the following story descriptive of 
what is claimed to be a certain oure for the bite of the 
rattlesnake. 

He first heard of it while he was engaged In mining 
in Mexico, and since he became superintendent of the 
prison he has seen two or three Mexican convicts who 
have been cured and who had the scars to show that 
they had been bitten. On the hand of one of them 
was the trace of a centipede's venomous contact, 
which poison also yields to the remedy. Its existence, 
however, is not widely known, even in Mexico, and is 
supposed to be almost entirely unknown out of the 
country. 

"There is in every rattlesnake a small sac, about the 
size of a Mexican bean, attached to the intestines. 
This is filled with a brownish or black fluid, and that 
fluid is the cure for tbe bite. If it is applied imme- 
diately the patient will not even suffer any swelling 
and will entirely avoid pain. 

Many Mexicans carry the .fluid with them at all 



times when they are in the mountain or desert. These 
Mexicans kill all the rattlers they can find, and most 
of them store tbe fluid in a receptacle made of a rifle 
cartridge shell, which is kept tightly corked." 

In anatomical descr iptions of the rattler no mention 
is made of this particular sac, though air sacs are 
numerous in the intestines of all members of the snake 
family. 

Mr. Daniel claims he has seen Mexicans remove it 
frequently. 

It may be that this fluid is the secret of the Moki 
Indians and accounts for the immunity that they en- 
joy from the poison of the rattler. Those who have 
attended their annual snake dances and have 'een 
dancers bitten have wondered that the bites were not 
fatal. 

At any rate, the secret of the immunity Is one of 
the most carefully guarded secrets of the rites of the 
Mokis and is kept within a secret order of the priest- 
hood. Dr. D J.Miller for years annually attended 
these dances and made a study of the ceremonies. 
The Indians formally adopted him not only into the 
tribes, but advanced him in the priesthood. The 
doctor wanted chiefly to learn the secret of the poison 
an'idote, and he was told year after year that th6 
next year he would be put in possession of the secret. 
But hedied without it. 



TRADE NOTES. 



IT DOES NOT PIT. 

The following letter was sent to Mr. J. S. Fanning- 
St. Thomas, Ont., Mav 20, 1905. 

Friend Jack— It may interest you to know that I 
have recovered my Smith Ejector No. 200 250 You 
may say for me that "Infallible" will not pit a gun 
for my Brother "Bob"— Bob Enslie and myself 
used the gun at the Dutcnman's firing 120 shots from 
it on December 20t,h. The gun was not wiped out 
before it was stolen. I recovered it May 29th still un- 
cleaned. It wiped out just as good as new, without a 
pit. Will have my shells loaded with "Infallible" for 
the coming season. JOE COFFEY 

Box 482. 

WHAT A GOOD GUN DOES. 

The wizard of Spirit Lake and the Parker gun.— 
At Dubuque, la., June 13 nd 14, Fred Gilbert, shoot- 
ing the Parker gun, was high man with 392 out of 
400, with 193 and 199 for the two days out of a possi- 
ble 200. On the second day Fred came near equaling 
his two previous famous records of 200 straight If 
he had, he would have said that "it was the gun." 

PETERS' POINTS 

At the Utica, N. Y., tournament, June 13-16, the 
New York City cup emblematic of the State Cham- 
pionship, was won by Mr. F. D. Kelsey, using Peters' 
factory loaded shells. Mr. Kelsey also won the Ful- 
ford Memorial Cup. Mr. Harvey McMurchy, the 
popular representative of the Hunter Arms Co., won 
second professional average, shooting Peters' Ideal 
shells. 

At Indianapolis, Ind., June 16, C. A. Young won 
high average, losing only five targets out of 200. Dr. 
Britton was high amateur with 91j%. Both these 
gentlemen, as well as the winner of the second general 
average, used Peters' factory loaded shells. The 
Grand Hotel cup was won by Joe Michaelis with the 
score of 46 out of 50. This cup carries with it the 
Inter state Championship of Ohio, Kentucky, Illinois, 
Michigan and Indiana. Mr. Michaelis shot Peters' 
shells. 

The tournament held on May 24th at Kane, Pa , 
was very well attended, and proved a success in every 
way. The high amateur average was won by Mr. J. 
T Atkinson, and second amateur average by Mr L. 
B, Fleming, both using Peters' factory loaded shells. 

At the Ohio State Shoot, at Canton, Ohio, June 
13th, 14th and 15th, the high average for the first day 
was won by Mr. Tryon, breaking 172 out of 180, and 
high amateur average on the second day by Mr. R. S. 
Rhoads, scoring 155 out of 160. Mr. C. A. Young 
averaged 96.2% during the entire tournament, ard 
Mr. E F. Haak of Canton, broke 102 straight, the 
longest run made by any amateur during the tourna- 
ment. All these gentlemen used Peters' factory 
loaded shells. 



ANOTHER WINCHESTER VICTORY. 

The Dominion Day Tournament of the Vancouver, 
B. C, Gun Club, which was held at Fairview Park, 
Vancouver, July 1st, was well attended, and as usual 
shooters of the Winchester Repeating Arms Co 's 
products carried off the honors of the day. The 
large number ot contestants using Winchester goods 
went to show that these goods are held in as high 
esteem by the best shots of Canada as they are in the 
United States. The professional average of the 
tournament was made by W. H. Seaver, of San Fran- 
cisco, Cal., with a Winchester "pump" gun and Win- 
chester "Leader" shells. Score 105 out of the possible 
110. The high amateur average was made by G. W. 
Miller, with a Winchester "pump" gun and the 
"Leader" shells, score 104 out of the possible 110. 
The second high amateur average was made by E. E. 
Ellis, with a Smith gun and the "Leader" shells, 
score 103 out of the possible 110 Tbe third high 
amateur average was tied for by Dell Cooper and R. 
V. Rowo on the score of 100 out of the possible 110. 
Both Mr. Cooper and Mr. Rowe shot Winchester 
"pump" guns. The longeststraignt run of tbetouma- 
ment, which was 48, was made by W. H. Seaver, 
shooting a Winchester "pump" gun and the "Leader" 
shells. The second longest straight run, 42, was made 
by E E. Ellis with "Leader" shells. The three man 
team trophy was captured by tbe Bellineham team, 
composed of Messrs. G. W. Miller, R V. Rowe and 
Dell Cooppr on the splendid score of 72 out of tbe 
possible 75, each man making 24 out of the allotted 25. 
All three of these men used the Winchester "purrp" 
guns. 



JULY 15, 1905) 



Cite gireefcev atto gyovteman 



11 




THE FARM. 





Improvement of Dairy Stock. 

It has often been said, with much truth, 
that there can be found in the United 
States now much better specimens of the 
pure bred Jersey stock than can be found 
in England or in the channel islands, 
which are their native home. There are 
good reasons why this should be true. 
The first that were brought here were 
mostly of small size, and produced small 
amounts of milk very rich in butter fat. 
Naturally they fell into the hands of men 
who could afford to pay the high prices 
which they cost, and could also afford to 
feed them liberally, and did so. They 
were called the rich man's pets, and it re- 
quired time to show that they were also 
good cows for the poor man who desired 
to make butter instead of selling milk. 

In New England they were turned into 
the best pastures instead of being tethered 
out with a rope as their ancestors had 
been on the island. The exercise they 
gained in roaming the fields and climbing 
the hilsides gave them more muscles and 
larger frame. As our pastures occasionally 
failed in times of drought to furnish food 
enough, the farmers began to grow corn 
and other forage crops to feed them at 
9uch times. Many owners also supple- 
mented the green feed in summer and 
the hay in winter with grain or food 
containing more of the milk-producing 
elements than hay alone. This kept up 
the good reputation of their pets and at 
the same time led their calves to grow 
larger and had a tendency to increase the 
milk production of each generation. As 
they became more numerous the process 
of selection began. Calves were raised 
from the best cows and those that were 
much inferior were not kept to grow 
many calves. More than all the rest, 
perhaps, the improvement was kept up 
by using only bulls from the best milk- 
producing cows, others being killed or 
sold to some one who wished to infuse a 
strain of Jersey blood into his native 
herds. 

As a result of this practice it is as easy 
now to find Jersey cows weighing eight 
hundred to nine hundred pounds and giv- 
ing sixteen to eighteen quarts, or thirty- 
four to forty pounds of milk a day, as it 
was forty years ago to find them weighing 
750 pounds and producing ten to twelve 
quarts of milk a day. And they have also 
by good feeding and warm stables been 
made to give milk more months in the 
year, until now the difficulty with many 
of them is to get them to go dry even a 
few weeks before dropping their calves. 

Something of the sameimprovement has 
been going on in the Holstein-I reisian 
stock during the last fifteen years, It not 
longer. Imported here as producers of 
milk to the amount of thirty to thirty-five 
quarts a day it was generally acknowl- 
edged that their milk was not rich in 
butter fat. They found in our pastures 
grasses more nutritious and better 
adapted to making butter than those 
growing on the diked meadows of Holland 
but they grew less luxuriantly, and their 
owners found it necessary to grow much 
green fodder to use in the summer aid 
ensilage to feed during the winter to All 
their capacious paunches, and keep up the 
large flow of milk. They also used the 
grain feeds with these, and if this did not 
show much effect upon the quality of the 
milk from these first cows, it has shown 
in later generations. The process of 
saving as breeding stock the progeny of 
those cows which showed by the Babcock 
method of testing the milk that their 
product contained the most butter fat 
aided in the good work, and now it is not 
unusual to find herds whose milk shows 
an average test of 3*2 to 4 per cent butter 
fat, while individual cows have shown 4)4 
to 5 per cent at certain periods of lacta- 



tion. There has also been a tendency to 
round out the form9 of the animal better, 
thus given them a better appearance when 
fitted for beef. 

But great as has been the progress 
made by these two pure breeds under 
American handling, it is but small when 
compared with that made by the use of 
the pure-bred bulls for crossing upon 
our native cattle, when the cross has 
been made with good judgment and good 
feeding and care has accompanied it. 

To understand some of the causes of 
success or of failures in this grading up 
of the native herds or scrub stock, as 
some advocates of the pure breeds pre- 
fer to call them, it is necessary to look 
back a little for the history of those 
herd?. They are not native in the sense 
of indigenous to America, but are de- 
scendants from the cattle brought here 
by the early settlers of New England, 
mostly between 1024 and 1670, or a little 
later. They came, as did the Puritan 
settlers themselves, from nearly every 
county in England, and probably were 
selected from the best those countries 
had. 

Devonshire sent her little red cattle 
and Durham her larger cattle, well 
known then for beef qualities, though 
the Collins Brothers had not then begun 
to develop them into what we know at 
Short Horns. Hereford sent some 
white-faced cattle, and the Long Horns 
were doubtless from Yorkshire and Lan- 
cashire. There were probably a few 
polled cattle from Norfolk, and from the 
northern countries, or from Scotland 
itself, came the Ayrshires, famous for 
milk production even then. 

Those early settlers certainly had but 
little knowledge of the principles of 
scientific breeding for improvement, but 
as the settlements were not near to- 
gether and but few bulls were imported 
excepting in the dams, there was proba- 
bly much inbreeding which served to 
fix the characteristics of the various 
breeds so firmly that some of the ani- 
mals descended from them could have 
been shown as lately as a half century 
ago as high grades of the various breeds. 



Advantage of Pure Bred Bulls. 



1. When a farmer thinks of buying a 
dairy bull to improve the quality of his 
future cows, he should look to the 
quality of the bull, not to the cheapness 
of the price. The character and relia- 
bility of the breeder go a great way in 
such a transaction. He should try to buy 
a "future" of good quality that will run 
on for generations, and that will help 
increase the good effects of every future 
sire that may be used, 

2. He should always breed in the line 
of his first effort. If his first bull was a 
Holstein, or Guernsey, or Jersey, or an 
Ayrshire, he should not break up the 
line of prepotencies and make a rope of 
sand of it. By a wise subsequent selec- 
tion of sires of the same breed, selecting 
all the time for breeding power, he will 
enlarge and broaden the stream of dairy 
heredity. What we are after, in reality, 
is a better and stronger heredity. 

3. About the most reliable basis of 
calculation as to the power of transmis- 
sion, or, as it is called, the prepotency 
of the bull, is the dairy character of the 
grandmothers and great grandmothers 
on both sides of his pedigree. He is the 
stored up result of what lies back of him. 
The quality of his ancestors will have 
more effect on his offspring than tho 
performance of his mother. She gives to 
him of what she inherited, moro than of 
what she does. She may bo rich in 
inherited qualities, and yet for some 
reason be herself only an ordinary per 
former. On tho contrary she may be a 
large performer at the pail, simply as a 
sport, but not having a strong tide of 
inheritance in a dairy direction, she has 
nothing to convey to son or daughter. 
This willexplain why so many Shorthorn 
cows that are large performors them- 
selves, fail utterly to convey their own 



dairy quality to their progeny. Their 
line of breeding is from a beef heredity 
for many generations, and they g\ ve to 
their progeny what they inherited. A 
cow breeds from her blood, not from her 
udder. So we must have dairy pedigree 
as well as dairy performance, if we get 
our money 's worth when buying a bull. 

4. There is one thing more quite 
necessary to consider in buying a dairy 
bull. Does he indicate from his appear- 
ance that he possesses a strong, individ- 
ual character? Is he of clear, determined 
dairy type, full of nerve energy, so that 
he will take possession of the female 
current, with which he is brought into 
contact, and thus stamp his heifers with 
the quality of the mothers that lie back 
of him? — Hoard's Dairyman. 

Good Prices for jerseys. 

The annual sale of imported Jerseys at 
Linden Grove, Coopersburg, Pa., property 
of T. S Cooper & Sons, took place recently. 
In all 103 head were disposed of. An 
aggregate of $61,060, an average price of 
.$642 per head, was received for 95 head. 

The highest prices paid were $10,000 for 
bull Eminent 61031, by Geo. E. Peer of 
Chili Station, N. Y.; $2525 for cow Re 
minder's Duchess 187420, by Bowmont 
Farms, Salem, Va.; $2500 for cow Fon 
taine's Oxford Pride, by Gedney Farm, 
White Plains, N. Y. ; $2000 for heifer 
Agatha's Dainty Lady 187478, by Gedney 
Farm; $1600 for cow My Gray Buttercup 
187416, by Gedney Farm and $1500 for 
cow Eminent's Evasion 187443, by Bow 
mont Farms. The 95 head mentioned in- 
cluded 8 bulls, 42 cows, 28 heifers and 1 
calves. The 8 bulls brought $12,520, an 
average of $1565 per head; the 42 cows 
brought $31,465, or $749 per head ; the 28 
heifers b ought $12,615, or over $450 per 
head, and the 17 calves brought $4460, or 
$292 per head. 

o 

Adding Butter Color to Salt. 



Butter color can often be mixed with 
the salt and made to color the butter 
satisfactorily. The evenness in which 
the color is added in this way depends a 
great deal on the size of the granules 
when yoa add the salt. First, mix the 
color thoroughly with the salt, then add 
this colored salt to the granular butter in 
the usual way and by allowing it to stand 
between workings the butter may be 
evenly colored. Working a number of 
times, but a little at each time, is better 
than trying to do all the working at once, 
— Hoard's Dairyman. 

o 

The day of sudden riches and great 
fortunes in the cattle business is past — it 
has departed along with the buffalo and 
the indian. A realization of this fact 
and an earnest endeavor to adjust him- 
self to the new conditions is the only 
salvation for the cattlemen of today 
The raising of cattle is no longer in the 
class of the faro i_'ame. It is a hard, cold 
business proposition. We must have no 
more of this buying of a bunch of Texas 
doaies, turning them loose and coming 
around after them in two or three years 
Cattle must now be raised by hand, so to 
speak. The business has lost its fasci- 
nating point— the gambler's chance— and 
careful business methods must be used to 
insure success. 

o 

One acre of alfalfa will pasture ten 
hogs from the opening of spring until 
fall. A hog weighing 100 pounds when 
turned out will double Its weight by fall 
without any othor feed. This moans 1000 
pounds of pork against 000 made by an 
acre of corn. Some claim that it Is better 
to give no other feed, furnishing them 
with plenty of water and salt, but our 
experience is that a little corn or other 
grain fed every day is of great advant- 
age. One or two pounds fed the first 
thing in the morning willsuffice for each 
animal. 

o 

Sober up on Jackson's Napa Soda. 



Sll 



In the Sheep Fold. 

Sheep are always improving or they ure 
deteriorating. 

When you buy a sheep for breeding be 
re it is better than what you have. 
Thesecretof successful sheep husbandry 
s to keep good sheep and in email flocks. 

Unless there is a continued effort to 
mprove the llocka they will go backward 
nstead of forward. 

In purchasing a ram get one fully 
developed, strong in limb, straight-shaped 
nd th roughly typical in his breed. 
If a radical change in the rations is 
made too suddenly, growth of both body 
nd fleece is liable to suffer a check. 
The lamb carcass can be produced for 
less than the aged sheep carcass and will 
sell for one-fourth more in market. 

Uniformity in wool can only be accom- 
plished by regular feeding and keeping 
the sheep in a healthy and thriving con- 
dition. 

Feeds are higher than usual, necessi- 
tating greater care in the management of 
flocks, if the profits are to be maintained. 

Wool must grow steadily and uniformly 
as it will have points, that is, weak places 
here and there that are very damaging. 



Hand Separator Cream. 



It has been well said that, considering 
the small volume of gathered cream com- 
pared with the whole milk system, there 
seems little reason in every farmer not 
having a perfect arrangement for keeping 
it. But it must be acknowledged that so 
far as we are able to learn by far the 
greater part of the cream from hand 
separators is still kept in cellars with 
vegetables and all kinds of things that 
have an odor that is not an addition to 
the flavor of the cream.— Farmers' Ad- 
vocate. 



Butter makers differ as to the relative 
advantages of the systems of salting but- 
ter commonly employed. Some prefer 
the brine salting process while others 
place most confidence in the old-fashioned 
system of dry salting. In theory the 
brine salting system is the better, as when 
this plan is followed and the brine is in- 
troduced while the butter is still in the 
form of minute granules the grains be- 
come evenly coated all over with a thin 
layer of salt and in this way it is uniformly 
incorporated. When the dry salting 
system is followed considerable difficulty 
is experienced in effecting uniform in- 
corporation of the salt with the mass of 
butter, even when in perfectly granular 
condition. One of the objections to the 
brine salting system is that it does not 
admit of such heavy salting as the more 
common system of applying the salt dry. 
o — — 

The thick, stringy condition sometimes 
noticed in cream is usually due to the 
presence of what are known as slimy or 
ropy bacteria, says Hoard's Dain/man. 
They produce a ropiness in milk" that 
may be all the way from a slight viscosity 
to milk that is so thick it will not pour 
out of a dipper. When such conditions 
occur there is but one way of stopping 
the trouble, and that is by a liberal use of 
hot water and washing soda. The water 
muet be scalding, and all utensils that 
are used in handling the milk must be 
thoroughly cleaned with brush, hot water 
and poda. 



For Sale 

A three-year-old lllly by Zombro 2:1 1 and a four- 
year-old Ally by Del Norte, both out of Manilla 
by Antrim (slro of Anzella 2:06y). Erie, brown 
stallion, grandson Electioneer, perfect roadster 
and excellent stock horse. 

Ladies' trap horo, two ladles' saddle horses, 
road cart, sulkies, bugglos, rockaway with pole 
and shafts, doublo and single harness, saddles, 
oto. 

This proporty belongs to tho est:, of GRANT 
LAPHAM, deceased. The business and good 
will Is also for sale. Stablo with room for 55 
horses for rent. Apply to 

1309 Pearl St., Alameda, or 
E. K. TAYLOR, 
Attorney, Park Row, Alameda 



12 



greclur anfr gpctrta man 



[July 15 1905 



The Scrub Must Go. 



The Stockman and Farmer for nearly 
a quarter of a . entury has been trying to 
tell its readers the ad vantages to be gained 
by breediog np their live stock. There 
was a time when the margin between the 
price of good cattle and scrubs was not so 
great as now. There are yet some TexaB 
ranchmen, we are ashamed to say, who 
argue against the use of improved blood. 
We are pleased to say, however, that 
these are a small minority, and their 
kind are becoming fewer and fewer each 
year. We doubt even now if one of these 
mossbacks, although he might so advise, 
would himself stock his ranee with a 
bunch of longhorned scrub cows and scrub 
bulls. 

Stockmen are in the business to make 
money, and they must produce that which 
the market demands. Common stuff is 
not wanted now by anybody. At least 
the big packers, or little ones either, do 
not want scrub stuff, as the market shows 
the demand is for cattle of Improved 
breeding and in good condition. While 
the market is bad enough still a fair class 
of stuff has brought fair prices, and 
always will. The other kind is hardly 
wanted at all. Texas has made great 
strides in the improvement of her cattle, 
but this work i9 hardly yet begun. Better 
and better, and still better cattle must be 
the slogan. Speaking along these lines 
the Drovers Journal in a late isaue said : 
Stockmen who have been on the Kan- 
sas City market the past few days have 
had an object lesson in the importance of 
growing high grade cattle that ought to 
give a stimulus to the grading up of the 
herds of the southwest country. While 
all kinds of cattle have been declining 
and thin stock was a drug on the market 
buyers from the corn belt states were 
scouring the yards for high grade stock 
steers, and many of them had to be satis- 
fied with something less to their liking or 
go home empty handed. There were 
plenty of cattle in the pens and owners 
were anx ous to sell them at prices prac- 
tically of the buyer's own making, but the 
quality was not right. Cattle are very 
much like potatoes in one respect. 
When priceB are high any kind will sell, 
but the cheaper they get the more par- 
ticular purchasers are as to quality. 
Do^y steers are cheap because nobody 
wants tnem, and nobody wants them be- 
cause they are cheap— cheap in quality as 
well as in price. 

Dogy steers never make market top- 
pers, and still, as a rule, it costs more to 
put one hundred pounds of gain on them 
than it does on high grade steers. The 
high grade steer has a better frame on 
which to put flesh, has more stretch to 
bim, has a better constitution, is a better 
feeder and yields more pounds gain to 
the oushel of grain than the dugy. Some 
times it pays to feed dogies, juetaB it pays 
sometimes to raise small potatoes— if you 
can't raise large ones. If potatoes are 
scarce and consequently high the frugal 
housewife will be content to prepare the 
little ones for the table notwithstanding 
the extra labor and patience required. 
When beef steers are high, packers will 
buy dogies and pay good prices for them. 
In the fall of 1903 several feeders took 
dogy steers to their feed lots from the 
Kansas City market, buying them at 
very low prices. In the early summer of 
1904 all kinds of beef steers were high 
and these dogies, if fat, commanded good 
prices and showed good profits for the 
feeders. 

Right now all kinds of beef steers are 
low and the best are preferred by the 
killers, because they are relatively cheaper 
than the doggies. If the packers want 
cheap beef now' they buy high grade 
steers, because there i9 a high per cent of 
kill to them. This is the case nine times 
out of ten. Observing feeders see this, 
and that is why they want the high grade 
stockers and feeders and willing to pay 
the prices for them. The moral is plain 
as day. It is that it behooves stockmen 
to cull out their pennyroyal breeding 



stock and use only the be9t females and 
pure bred males for breeding purposes. It 
pays to do so now, and each succeeding 
year it will pay bigger. The dogy has 
had his day. 

The Swine Industry. 



One of the great industries of our 
country and the one that a very large 
majority of the farmers are more inter, 
eeted in than any other, and the one that 
brings in more money frequently to pay 
taxes, store bills and doctor bills, is the 
swine. Truly the hog is the gentleman 
that roots the mortgage off the farm. 
Kuowing the great importance of this line 
of farmers' work is the motive that in- 
duces me to present a few thoughts that 
may be beneficial to some brother farmer. 
If there is any one class of people that 
deserve the best of everything I believe 
that class is the toilers of the soil, the 
ones that feed the world. 

This brings me to speak of one of the 
good things that every farmer should 
have ; that is a herd of well bred hogs. 
The day of the hazle splitter is past, when 
it took twelve to twenty-four months to 
mature them, and fit them for market, 
and if one at that age weighed 250 or 300 
pounds, hia owner thought he had a 
whopper. 

In starting in the business a man should 
be very careful in the selection of his 
foundation stock. The first thing for him 
to do is to decide what breed he would 
rather handle, and there are many good 
ones. The Berkshire, Du roc-Jersey, 
Cheiter Whites, Poland-Chinas, Tam- 
worth and Thin Rine are all popular 
breeds and have their admirers. I be- 
lieve this is as it should be, as it gets up 
a spirit of competition and the different 
breeders strive to excel in bringing their 
herds to the highest point of excellence. 
I believe this idea of difference of opinion 
being right was fully demonstrated when 
the preacher said : "If we were all of the 
same opinion, then every man would 
want my wife Sallie." Just then one of 
the men spoke up and said : "Yes, and 
before God, if they were all of my opinion 
nobody would want her,"— and so it goes. 

I shall now speak of the general make- 
up of the future brood sow. She should 
have a short head, wide between the 
eyes and a good, plump eye, a motherly 
look, ears not too large. Discard a hog 
with saddle skirt ears. They are difficult 
to drive, their ears blind them. Head 
well set up to the shoulders, a good broad 
back slightly arched, good bams that 
come well down on bocks, deep sides and 
good length, must be roomy in order to 
raise large litters. Ought to have ten or 
twelve well developed teats and of course 
should be chosen from a dam that is 
known to be a good stickler and that 
raised large litters. She should have a 
large bone and stand well upon her feet. 
To the casual observer these would ap- 
pear to be Bmall matters, but I wish to 
say that the farmer who succeeds is the 
one who looks well after the small details 
of the farm. — E. W. Robinson in Ex. 



hybridizing. We can well imagine his 
surprise when he saw the long eared colt 
browsing among the cacti and sage brush 
in the wilderness and discovered that it 
was neither like its sire nor like the 
broncho which he owned as its dam. 

Hybridizing fell under the ban of the 
Mosaic law, but so respectable had the 
mule become that it seems to have been 
the favorite animal of the princes of the 
blood, for Abs-lom on that fatal day when 
hie army was defeated in the trans- 
Jordanic country attempted to flee away 
on a mule. Possibly the princes were 
trying to dodge the law that they shouid 
net multiply horses to themselves by do- 
ing what seemed the next best thing, 
using mules as their favorite chargers, an 
ancient example of keeping the letter of 
the law while violating its spirit — not un- 
common even among very highly respect- 
able people in later times. Therefore do 
not despise the mule, but consider him, 
and consider him wisely, and consider 
also whether it is not quite as profitable 
in certain sections of the country to grow 
mules as horses. 



New Way to Make Butter. 

By way of a Chicago paper we learn 
that a commit tee of the Franklin Institute 
of Philadelphia has made public a report 
on the Tay'or process of making butter, 
and recommending that Mr. Taylor re- 
ceive the John Scott medal and premium. 
In this process sweetcream is poured into 
shallow pans, the bottoms of which are 
covered with absorbent pads. These pads 
are composed of heavy white blotting 
paper and absorb from the cream nearly 
all of its constituents except the fat. The 
cream fat remains as a layer on the sur- 
face of the pads and after several hours 
standing it may be rolled off. In this 
condition the product contains rather too 
much water and milk proteids; on this 
account, and because of the absence of 
salt, it does not keep well. If, however, 
the separated butter fat be worked and 
salted in the same way as the ordinary 
churned product, the result is a fine 
grade of butter. The process has the 
advantage of cheapness, since the pads 
may be used over and over again lasting 
t is said for six months of daily use. The 
labor of churning is avoided, and, on 
account of the use of fresh cream instead 
of thrt which has stood to ripen for 
several days, the finished product keeps 
better than butter made in the ordinary 
way. 

Dairy System Pays. 



The Mule. 



Although the mule has no pride in bis 
paternity nor hope of posterity, it never 
theless has an ancient if not honorable 
lineage, Bays a writer in an exchange 
The first record of it, at least in bible 
times, is to be found in the thirty-sixth 
chapter of the book of Genesis, where the 
historian records the descendants of 
Esau. Dukes were plentiful in those 
days, but none of them seem to have done 
anything in particular to beget other 
dukes, until we read ol one Anah, the 
son of Zibeon. Zibeon does not seem to 
be a duke at all, the nobility not running 
in that line, but he begat a son named 
Anab, of whom the historian pauses to 
record as follows : "This was that Anah 
that found the mules in the wilderness 
as he fed the asses of Zibeon his father. 
This man did something, and is about the 
only one of the lot. He discovered 
apparently by accident, the method of 



First select some good breed, the one 
best adapted to your locality, and most 
to your liking, and then establish a sys- 
tem in caring for the herd and be regular 
in carrying it out in every detail, writes 
E. M. Pike in Massachusetts Ploughman. 

Feed at the same time each day, and 
the same amount. Do not think that you 
can feed three times one day and feed the 
same amount at two feeds the next and 
let the cows go with the third feed and 
get the same result. It does not matter 
so much how many times a day you feed 
as it does to feed the same number of 
times each day. Water as regularly as 
as you feed and do not forget to card 
and brush the cows as regularly as you 
feed and water. 

Even the cleaning of the stable and 
all other work about the stable should be 
done at the same time each day, as the 
cows will soon learn to know what time 
they are to be fed and watered and 
worked around, and will expect it, and 
become uneasy and restless if the expected 
operation is delayed, but will lie down 
peacefully and quiet after it is performed. 

Cows should have their place in the 
stable, and be tied in the same stanchion 
each time. This will avoid much con. 
usion in tieing them up, as each cow will 
soon learn her place and take it, and 
besides a tieup full of cows looks much 
better if the cows are arranged in order 
according to size, being graded from one 
end of the tieup to the other. 



Again, it is much more convenient to 
feed a lot of cows if they are in the same 
plate each time so that the feeder knows 
just which one he is feeding even if he 
cannot see her. As hardly any two could 
require the same amount, this will be 
found a great convenience. Feed regu- 
larly ; water regularly ; groom regularly ; 
tie up regularly, but above all, milk regu- 
larly. 

A cow allowed to go any length of time 
beyond her usual milking time becomes 
uneasy and restless to the detriment of 
both quantity and quality of milk. 

A cow also becomes used to a milker 
and should have the same one right along. 

The idea of a man, whom I recently 
met, although quite original and perhaps 
having some good features, was I believe, 
wrong in the main. He let his cows come 
into the stable and take their place any- 
where it happened, and then at milking 
time he and his men began at one end 
and milked the cows as they came to 
them. This he said he did because it was 
difficult to get good milkers, and in this 
way he got a chance to milk each cow 
himself once in a while and find out if 
she was all right He seemed to forget 
that the poor milker got the same chance 
to poorly milk all of the cows as well as 
himself and thus damage the whole herd. 

Establish a system about your stable 
w rk and then abide by it to the nearest 
perfection possible and see if it does not 

pay- b 

Ju8tsosure as the number of grazing 
animais is allowed to increase beyond 
the capacity of the range we must expect 
more or less loss. It is never safe to 
attempt to graze seventy-five or eighty 
head upon a section of land which will 
only safely carry fifty head the year 
round, although if natural conditions are 
exceptionally favorable during a particu- 
lar year as they are this season a man 
may overstock his pastures and realize a 
profit during that year. On the contrary, 
should the natural conditions not prove to 
be aB favorable as the stockman had hoped 
his losses at seventy-five or eighty head 
to the square mile will largely exceed the 
normal losses were the land stocked only 
to the extent of its minimum carrying 
capacity. Not only will the pecuniary 
loss, or the probability of such loss, be 
less and the actual profits on the cattle be 
more in the case of undergrazing, but the 
land itself will gradually increase in value 
and the grazing capacity be augumented 
from year to year. In one case the land 
is stocked beyond its carrying capacity, so 
that it rapidly and continuously deterio- 
rates in value; in the other case constant 
increase in value may be confidently 
expected, both of the land and its pro- 
ducts during the same series of yearB. 
o 



Sponges. S. Adderley, 307 Market St 



Warranted to Give Satisfaction. 

Gombault's 

Caustic Balsam 




Has Imitators But No Competitors. 

A Safe, Speedy and Positive Cure for 
Curb, SpUnt Sweeny, Capped Hook, 
Strained Tendons, Founder, Wind 
Puffs, and all lameness from Spavin, 
Ringbone and other bony tumors. 
Cures all akin diseases or Parasites, 
Thrush, Diphtheri". Removes aU 
Bunches from Horse, or Cattle. 
AS a Human Remedy for Rheumatism, 
Sprains, Sore Throat, etc., It Is Invaluable. 

>>ery bottle or Caustic Balsam sold " 
Warranted to irlve satisfaction. Ivloe $1 50 
tier bottle. Sold l>y draggtata, or sent by «- 
i.res*. chareres raid. »itn full directions for 
Its u"e rSTScnd for descriptive j|r<-"lars, 
testimonials, etc. Address •) 
•The Lawrence-Williams Co.. Cleveland. 



July 15, 1905] 



Mrs -gveebev cmt* ^povt&maii 



13 



Judging Live Stock. 

Stock judging is a skill naturally 
possessed by some and it is a science that 
the breeder and feeder should understand. 
The agricultural colleges are giving prac- 
tical instruction in judging live stock 
that is one of the most fascinating studies 
of the college, as it includes the knowledge 
of improved stock breeding. The students 
visit many prominent breeders of the 
different breeds and at the state fairs and 
at the Chicago International they test 
their judgment and skill. 

Prof. Ferguson, of the Michigan Agri- 
cultural College, gives the following rules 
to hia students : 

1. Have confidence in your own powers. 

2. Concentrate your thoughts on the 
breed and breed type of the animals you 
are working upon. 

3. Do not hurry. Take time to decide. 
Having done eo, stick to it. "Be sure you 
are right, then go ahead." 

4. If possible watch the class as it 
comes into the ring. There is often some- 
thing about the style and carriage of the 
winner whicn marks him out as he walks. 

5. Take a minute to look over the line 
from as near the center as possible in 
order to get a general idea on conforma- 
tion. 

6. Then pass slowly clear around the 
ring, inspecting each animal from front 
and rear. 

7. Never be satisfied without using 
your,hand in addition to your eyes. Ap- 
pearances are often deceitful. 

8. In handling always work from front 
to rear. With cattle work on the right 
side, approaching the animal from behind. 

9. First pick out the winner of the 
class ; then use it as your standard in 
placing second and third. 

10. When first is placed, briefly sum 
up its strong points. 

11. Look for characteristics and most 
common breed defects. 

12. Pay no attention to either the men 
with you or the crowd around you. Your 
business is with the animals. 



muscle, form and bone. Build the frame, 
the fat can go on later. A fat little pig is 
in poor condition to grow. You want 
them smooth, mellow, stretchy, and you 
will then build a good form. 

It is better to raise eight good pigs than 
twelve inferior ones. There will be more 
money in the former than in the latter, 
though they outnumber them. Quality is 
more important than quantity. 

The pig is a clean animal, if you will 
allow him to be so, although some people 
compel them to wade through mud leg 
deep to eat their feed. This is not their 
fault. 

All troughs and feeding pens should be 
kept scrupulously clean. Don't let any 
feed remain after they get through with 
the food in the trough. It sours, moulds 
and is unhealthy. 

If you permit the beds of your little 
pigs to become wet, damp and unchanged, 
your pigs will soon be troubled with sore 
tails and scours. 

The healthy pig is the profitable pig. 
Do all thing9 towards improving and 
maintaining the health if you would make 
a profit in the hog business. 

Be sure the pigs have a trough for 
themselves that cannot be reached by the 
mother or other hogs. It teaches them to 
eat and prevents any shrinkage during 
weaning. It is a self-weaner. 



The Dairyman's Four C's. 

Washing the churn is something we 
cannot be too particular about. First, 
rinse out in clean, cold water, then wash 
in hot water and scald thoroughly. If 
you have a dash in your churn, take it 
all apart and see that it is well scalded, 
and then dry. Keep your churn in a 
clean, dry place. Don't let it stand dirty 
any longer than possible after it is used 
All milk utensils should be rinsed in cold 
water then washed in hot water and 
scalded. Don't use soap, a little soda is 
better and will help to sweeten them 
and remove all odors. Have cloths and 
towels on purpose for that and see that 
they are kept clean and pure. We notice 
where there is complaint about butter 
not gathering in cold weather ia mostly 
because the cream is too cold when 
churned. An engineer without water or 
a steam gauge on his engine is no worse 
off than a dairyman without a ther 
mometer. Keep your cream well stirred 
No unnecessary delay should be allowed 
between the proceas of handling the 
cream and making the butter. 

The women of the farm should assert 
their rfghta and have the improved 
methods of caring for milk and butter and 
thus have a desirable article to sell which 
has not cost bo much hard labor to pro- 
duce. It ia said butter costs from eleven 
to thirty centa per pound. We ahould 
manage our waya so our butter will not 
cost so much, and that is by introducing 
better cows, feeding better and employing 
better methoda throughout the work A 
noted writer aaya there are four C's to 
look after sharply in successful dairying 
They are cows, care, comfort and cleanli- 
neaa.— Exchange. 



Deposit Tour 
Idle Funds 



The wolf problem has become a live 
issue around Pinedale, Wyo. Cattlemen 
are growing desperate because of the 
raida by wolves. Hundreds of cattle have 
been lost on the upper ranges, the wolvea 
even attacking grown animals and ham- 
stringing them. A big hounty is being 
offered to hunters for olf scalps. 
o 

Sohor up on .Taokson's Napa Soda. 



KENDALL'S SPAVIN CURE 




Continues to be the one reliable 
remedy for Spavins, Ring- 
bones, Curbs, Splints and 
all forms of lameness. 
KENDALL'S SPAVIN CURE 

cures promptly, permanently, with- 
out ecar. 91 a bottle. 6for|5. All 
druggiBtft. Unequalled for fimllyuie. 
Book, A Treadteon the II, r* .free. 

Dr. B. J. KENDALL CO. 
Enogburg Fgllgi Vermont. 



Daedalion 2:10 For Sale. 

Can Beat His Record Three Times 
In a Race. 

Is entered at Fresno and ready to start. 
A high-class Race Horse and a Coming Sire. 

Sire, DIABLO 2:09 1-4. 

Dam GRACE (dam of Daedalion 

2:10, Creole 2:15, Eagle 2:19$, etc.) 

by Buccaneer. 

Owner's business will not permit him to devote 
any time to racing For further particulars 
address 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN. 



Tuttle's Elixir 

$100.00 REWARD. 

Cures all species of lameness, 
curbs, splints, contracted 
cords, thrush, etc., in horses. 
Equally good for internal 
use in colic, distemper, foun- 
der, pneumonia, etc. Satis- 
faction guaranteed or money 
refunded. Used and endorsed 
by Adams Express Company. 
SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS. 
rUTTLE'8 FAMILY ELIXIR Cures rheumatism, sprains, 
bruises, etc. Kills pain instantly. Our 100-page 
book, "Veterinary Experience," FRCC. 
TUTTLF/S ELIXIR CO., 52 Beverly St., Boston, Biss. 
Ink A <o., *(rfi,c«, 11.16 FrnmoDl St., s»„ FmriMfi Oat, 
Beware of so-called Ulixirs. Tattle's only is grimne. Avoia 
all blisters: they are only temporary relief. 




About Pigs. 



Grow the pigs from the Btart. Don't 
fatten them, but grow them, put on the 



IF YOU WISH TO ADVERTISE 

IN newspapers; 

ANYWHERE AT ANYTIME 
Call on or Write 

E.C.DAKE'S ADVERTISING AGENCY ' 

124 Sansome Street 

6AN FRANCISCO, CALIF.^ 



QOCOANUT OIL CAKE 

THE BEST FEED FOB 

STOCK, CHICKENS AND PIOS 

FOR 8ALB IN LOTS TO SUIT BT 

EL DORADO LINSEED OIL WORKS CO. 

208 California Street, Ban Francisco. Oal. 



WITH THE 



Central Trust Company 
of California 

42 MontsromeryZSt. 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



You can open a Savings Account 
by mail with any sum 
large or small. 

INTEREST PAID SEMI-ANNUALLY 

3 1-4% on Ordinary Savings 
3 6*10% on Term Savings 

Send for Booklet, 
"THE SURE WAY TO WEALTH." 



CALIFORNIA 

NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY 

Through Picturesque California. 

The Ideal Route for 

Tie Aider aid Mm Trips 

One clay's ride from San Francisco will take 
you to some of the tlneBt Trout Streams In the 
State. Along the line and within easy distance 
are many of the best Springs and Summer Resorts 
in the State. The Company maintains a Fish 
Hatchery and annually stooks the many streams 
reached by its road One million Trout Fry were 
planted last year In these streams. 

Black Bass Fishing can be enjoyed in Russian 
River near Guerneville, Guernewood Park and 
Camp Vaoatlon, in season. 

The best Striped Bass Fishing water* on the 
Coast reached by the Tlburon Ferry. 

VACATION FOR 1905 

issued annuallj by the Company, Is now ready. 
This Is the standard publication on the Coast for 
Information regarding Mineral Springs. Resorts, 
Country Homes and Farms where summer board- 
ers are taken, and Select Camping Spots. 

Beautifully illustrated, 150 pp and can be had 
In response to mail request or at ticket offices. 

Ticket OrriCEs— 650 Market Street (Chronicle 
Bldg) and Tiburon Ferry, foot of Market Street. 

General Office— Mutual Life Ins Bldg., cor. 
Sansome and California Sts., San Francisco. 



and just as they want it. The right way to 
salt animals is to let them help themselves. 

Gompressed 

Pure-Salt Bricks 

in our Patent Feeders, supply refined dairy salt. 
They mean animal thn It. Th^y cost bu t little. 

Convenient for you and your I 
animals suffer no neglect. A?k I 
your dealer and write us for | 
booklet. 



JAS. L. FRAZIEK, 
Gen. Mgr. 



R. X. RYAN, 
Gen. Pass. Act. 



PHENOL SODIQUE 



heals 






If 



Belmont 
Stable 
Supply Co. 

Mfrs. 

Brooklyn. 
N. Y. 



A GOOD FILLY FOR SALE. 



feoLSODiaUE 

*«^*T.C. ANTISEPTIC A NO 0JS1NFCCTAK 



*ANCE BROTHERS & WHITE. 



CUTS, BURNS 
and SORES. 

THE BEST 
Antiseptic 

Dressing 

for 

Man or Beast. 



ICe'p handy for emer- 
gencies in home 
and stable. 

Equally good for dogs 
and all animals. 



If not at your drug- 
gists, small size s<nt 
to any address upon 
receipt of 10c. 



HANDSOME TWO-YEAR-OLD FILLY BY 
Lochinvar 2:20, he by Director H. 2:27 by 
Director 2:17: first dam Myrtle by SterliDg 6223; 
second dam Theresa by Prompter; third dam 
E 1 press by Flaxtall; fourth dam Lady Narley HANCF RPOTHFR's & WHITF 
by Marion, son of Mambrlno Chief 11. This Oily llm,VLl Di\vj 
is well broken, perfectly sound, good galted and 
a flrst-class prospect. For further particulars 
address J D BLAMEY, | 

Box 715, Grass Valley , Cal. 



Pharmaceutical Chemists 
PHILADELPHIA CHICAGO 



LIVERY FOR SALE. I 

ONE OF THE FINEST STABLES IN THE ' 
State Has been established for years and is 
doing a good paying livery and boarding stable 
business Located in one of the most prosperous 
cities in California A first olass proposition in 
every respect. Thorough Investigation before 
purchasing solicited. Will be sold for 75% of its 
value Excellent reason for selling. For further 
particulars oall or address "Livery," Breeder 
and SPORTSM^N^San Franolsco. Cal 



PARK HORSE FOR SALE. 

HIGH-CLASS ROADSTER, COAL BLACK, 
1554 hands, five years old. weighs 1000 pounds. 
Is a very handsome horse, a perfeot beauty: fear- 
less of all things on the road: has been driven by 
a lady. Has lots of speed, but never trained on a 
track. Sound and all right. Sire and dam both 
registered. Apply to 

E. A. GRIGSBY, Napa, Cal. 





Th 

Modern 

Business Necessity CAPACITY «».»■>».•»» 

TliaAamaM Olcultdni MbcMim. BoiliuslailkaU]! endorsed ti,e 

world over. Rapid, arrurate. ajtapla, durable. T.ofnoHfli: ox- 
Idlaed copper Hull*, N 1"), n»Mi/ed illiet l.nKI.. tin no. prepaid in 
U.S. Write for rrea Booklet .in. I BpeclrU Offer Agents wanted 

C. B. I ... k. .Ml. Co. 105 Walnut St., Kensett, Iowa. 



672-680 11th Ave. 
Back of The Chutes. 



All kinds of Horses 
bought and sold. 



THE ZIBBELL STABLE 

Z1BBELL X HON, Proprietors. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Boarding, Training and Handling all kinds of 
Fancy Horses. A few Nloe Rigs on hand Take 
any car going to the Chutes. Tel.: West 259. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

ALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT AND TRUST 
Company, corner California and Montgomery 
Sts.— For the six months ending June 30 1905, 
dividends have been declared on the deposits In 
the savings department of this company, as fol- 
lows: On term deposits at the rate of 8 6-10 per 
oent per annum, and on ordinary deposits at the 
rate of S<( per oent per annum, free of taxes, and 
payable on and after Saturday. July 1. 1905. 

J. DALZELL BROWN, Manager. 



Seldom See 

a big knee like this, but your horse 
may have a bunch or bruise on his 
Ankle, Hock, Stifle, Knee or Throat. 

ABSORBINE 

will clean them "IT without laying 
the horse up. No blister, no hair gone. 
$2(ll>perltottle. delivered. Book 10-B 
free. ABSORBING, JR.. for man- 
kind, (1.00 Bottle. Removes Soft 
Bunches, Cures Varicose Veins. Gen- 
uine manufactured only by 

XV F YOUNG, P. D. F., 
64 Monmouth Street Springfield. Mass. 

Forsaieby .nacK&Co Langiey ciMlohaelsCo. 
aldington & Co., J. O'Kane and J. A. McKerron, 
all of San Franotsoo. 




TRAINING AND BOARDING 8 FABLES 

DEVISADERO AND FULTON STREETS. 

(1308 Fulton Street) 

Business Horses For Hire. 

I have opened a new Boarding and Training 
Stable near the above corner, and will board and 
train for racing, road use or matinee driving a 
limited number of Qrst-olass horses at reasonable 
rates. Have good location, brand-new stable and 
everything flrBt-olass. All horses In my oare will 
receive tho best of attention. 

T. C. CABNEY. 
Telephone: Page 4147. 



Mark Levy & Co. 



«U«K LtVY 
r. apart C«fH«» 

and hlUr../ ■ 
hi* S«l» 
Itnm . 
V5. DO up 



KfJUirv 51.. S. f. Hiwrm IM-20 




Onlv Itw 
K.-t Help 

-tmploy«d... 
All work 

**>m on the 



Phone Grant 158 



14 



i&h* $ve&b*K cut** ^poxtzxtxtw 



(July 15, J90 6 




THE BAYWOOD STUD) 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAL. 

(Property of Johs Parrott, Esq.) 
Devoted Exclusively to the Breeding and Training of 

High Stepping 
Hackney Bred 
Harness Horses 



WALTER SEALT. Manager. 



Isrit He Worth Saving ? t 

Why trade oft or sell nt a bepirnrly price a good 
horse just bee ruse he "gtim lame,'* "throws a 
curl>" or develops some other blemish? 'I here 
is nothing in the way of Spavins, Curtis. Sphuts, 
Windpuffs or Bunches which w ill not \ ield 
readily and permanently to treatment with 

OUINN'S 
OINTMENT. 

l)r. h.. II. Davenport, a prominent physician of Sheridan lnd.. 
rrites. 1 have u-t'd a number of remedies for the removM of 
urhs, pplints, thickened temloiiH and tissues fcenernll.v. but for 
the last two years I have not been without Qulnn's Ointment. I have tested it thor- 
oughly at ilifrereiit times, and say witho jt hesitancy th* t it is the only reliable rente 
dy of the kind I have e"*" - 

•cot hj m.lL Wrlu> ui Tor 
circular*. t*«tttmol»l« 




ntanc 

Pries S 1 .00 per bottle. Bold by all drug; 

W. B. Eddy & Co., Whitehall. N.Y, 



HIGHLAND 



(TRIAL 2:12) 

Bred at Highland Stock 
Farm, Dubuque, Iowa, 



Expresso 29199 

half brother to 
Expressive (3) 



Will make the Season of 1905 to a llmltednumberof approved 
mares st the farm of Mr. C. W. Clam, 

SAN MATEO, CAL. 

Terms for the Season $ 25 

HIGHLAND is a grand looking young stallion, ^^Zlt^w^raZth 
most fashionable aad his Immediate a°°° 9t 9 re a™^™?.^ 
fast records. He is beautifully gal ted and has i per feet. "«^*!X 01 £J" 
pull or want to break at speed, and can be plaoed at w 11 to » bunch of ™ r ™» t *g 
is a hlgh olais horse and has better than 2: 10 speed. As he is i to be bred to nis 
owner's maros this year and specially prepared for a low ™pj& tb\a t*ll, his owner, 
desires that he be bred to a few hlgh-olass outside mares this season. 

HIGHLAND is s ooal black horse with one white hind ankle, stands 16 hands 
high and weighs close to 1200 pounds. 

A few mares at $25 each will also be received to be bred to 

KINNEY WILKES 

champion KINNEY WILKES is hardly broken yet, but has shown 2:30 speed 

this year with the view of racing him next season. „,,,,„,„,, 

For further particulars regarding above Stallions apply to or address 

W. A. CLARK jr., Owner. D - W 

TED HAYES, Manager. 



Advertiser 2:15*.. 
Sire of 

Mlthra 2:14* 

Adaria ....2:1B>< 
Adbell... 2:23 
World's cham- 
pion yearling / 

Esther J 

Dam of 1 



Electioneer 
166 in 2:30 



Lnla WilkeB 
dam of 3 In list 



Express 

(thor.) 
Collsseum 
(thor.) 



Alpha 2:23(4 .. 

Dam of 
Aegon 2:18* (sire Aegon 
Star 2:11*): Algy 2:l»J£; 
Aeolion 2:20. sire of 
Wedgonut 2:265£; Lady 
Acacia, dam of Precursor 
2:20(4: Erst, dam of 
Walno2:29K 



Expressive 

(3)2 12* 

Express. ...2:21 

Kelly 2:27 

Alcantara 2:23 ... 
Sire of 
Sir Alcantara. . . 

2:05* 

Moth Miller 2:07 , 
Sufreet....2:06* 
Jessie Pepper J 

lone ".?. ".'.«: ITU loau.Sldi Hamel 

Alpha 2:23* 

3 producing sons 
7 " daughters 



Geo. Wilkes 2:22 
83 in 2:30 



Alma Mater 
dam of 8in2:i0 



Mamb Chief II 
sire of 6 In 2:30 



FOUR-YEAR-OLD BAY STALLION BY McKINNEY 

2:11*, champion sire of the world; 
Dam, HAZEL WILKES 2:1 1 * by Guy Wilkes 2:15*; 
second dam, Blanche (dam of 5 in the list) by 
Arthurton; third dsm, Nancy by Gen. Taylor, 30-mlle 
He is 15 2 hands and weighs »bout 1050 pounds. He will be worked 



DONNELLY, Agent, 

San Mateo, Cal. 




McMURRAY 




McMURRAY SULKIES 

and JOGGING CARTS 

Standard the World Over. 
•S-Address for printed matter and prices. 

W. J. Kenney, 

531 Valencia St., San Francisco, Cal. 



===== THE HOME OF ===== 

McKINNEY, 8818, 2:11% 

The unprecedented World's Leading Sire of Extreme Race 
Horse Speed. Fee, $300 until May 1 Oth, after which no 
bookings will be accepted for less than the advanced fee of $500. 

Prince Favorite, 38076, 

TRIAL (3) 2:21; HALF IN 1:09; QUARTER IN :34. 
Son of The Beau Ideal. 2:15%, and Princess Chimes dam of 
Lady of the Manor, 2:04%. :::::::::::: 

This National Horse Show Prize Winner is conceded by many to be 
prospectively the finest stallion ever bred at Village Farm. Fee, $ 1 00. 



Fees are invariably payable before mares leave the farm. No 
return privilege, but fees returned if mare fails to have a colt. 
Keep, $2. per week. Our terms are rigidly adhered to in all 
cases and we cannot accept any deviation from them. : : : 

Kindly mention Ihis journal FrnnilY* CilV pAVm* CL 

when writing and address * ^ ILmpiI G K^lly T ai IIlS, N 



CUBA, 
Y. 



Ross McMahon E8JF 

Truck, Wagon and Horse Covers, Gamp Furniture, etc. 



GOOD WORK. PROMPT SERVICE. 
REASONABLE PRICES. (Phone: Bush 858) 



35 MARKET ST„ SAN FRANCISCO 



THE BEST VETERINARIANS 

Are now using CRAFT'S DISTEMPER CURE. 

IT DOES THE WORK 

THAT'S THE SECRET. 

If it pays them it will pay you. Costs but 50c and SI single bottle. $4 50 and 
S9 by, the dozen. If direct, we prepay the charges. Write for free booklet. 

13 3d st, Lafayette, lnd. 

I> E. NEWELL, General Agent for Pacific Coast 519 Mission St , San Francisco, Cal 




Wells Medicine Co/' 



OF ALL HORSE OWNERS 
AND TRAINERS 



75 PER CENT 

USE AND RECOMMEND 

CampbelFsHorseFootRemedy 




JAS. B. CAHPBELL&CO. 



... SOLD BY.... 

SAYRE & SON Sacramento, Cal 

R. T. FRAZIER Pueblo, Colo 

J. G. READ & BRO Ogden, Utah 

JUBINVILLE & NANCE Butte, Mont 

A. A. KRAFT CO SpokaDe, Wash 

A. F. HOSKA HARNESS CO Tacoma, Wash 

McSORLEY & HENDERSON.... Seattle, Wash 

C. RODDER StocktoD, Cal 

WM. E. DETELS Pleasanton, Cal 

W. C. TOPPING San Diego, Cal 

JEPSEN SADDLERY CO Los Angeles, Cal 

H. THORWALDSON Fresno, Cal 

JOS. McTIGDE San Francisco, Cal 

BRYDON BROS. HARNESS MFG CO 

Los Angeles, Cal 

Manufacturers, 412 W.Hadlson St., CHICAGO , ILL 



MANHATTAN 



RED BALL BRAND. 

Positivelv Cures Colic, Scouring and Indigestion. 

C. P. KKRTELL. Manager. 



'Awarded Gold Meda 1 
At California State 
Fair 1892. 

Every horse owner who 
values his stock should 
constantly have a sup- 
ply of it on hand. It 
(improves and keeps 
stock In the pink of 
Icondltlon. 

iTanbattan Food Co 

1253 Folsom St., San Francisco 
Ask your grocers or dealers for it. 



HEALDS 



BUSINESS COLLEGE 
24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal 



The oldest, the largest, the most popular com- 
mercial school on the Pacific Coast. 20,000 gradu- 
ates; SO teaohers: 70 typewriters; over 800 students 
annually placed In positions. Send for catalogue. 



K. P. UEALD. President. 



Chronic Bronchitis and Catarrh of the Bladder 
Cored In 48 Honrs. 



CAPSULES 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

IMPROVED 

STALLION SERVICE BOOKS 

(POCKET SIZE) 

100 Pages. Price $1, postpaid. 

Most Complete Book 
of the kind published. 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 
36 Geary St.. San Francisco. 



Superior to Copaiba, Cohen* or Injectlcu 



Photo Engraving Company 

HIGH CLASS ART 
IN 

Half Tones and Line Engraving 

Artistic Designing. 
506 Mission St., cor. First, San Francisco 



JULY 15, 1905| 



15 



THE CONSOLATION HANDICAP 



Held at Indianapolis, June 27-30, 1905. was won by Mr. Jas. T. Atkinson of Newcastle, Pa., score 99 out of 100 from the 18-yard mark, using 

PETERS FACTORY LOADED SHELLS 

This was the Only Event Durlnc the Entire Grand American which was won from Behind the 
16 yard Line. Many other Notable Scores were made with Peters Shells, among them the following: 
is on Practice Day, F. M See (tie), 99 out of 100. 1st on First Day, L. H. Reid (tie). 99 out of 100. 2d In Preliminary, Wm Veach (tie), 97 out of 100. 3d In Grand American, M. Arle (tie), 97 out of 110 

In the Consolation Handicap, 3 scores of 98, 5 of 97, 4 of 94 and 26 others above 90 wore made with Peters Shells 

All of which merely goes to prove that Peters Shells are WINNERS. 

THE PETERS CARTRIDGE CO., Cincinnati, Ohio 



New York: 98 Chambers Street, T. H. KELLER, Manager. 



The Hunter 

Is Absolutely 
Perfect 



One-Trigger 

Put on Any L, C. SMITH 
GUN, New or Old. 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE. 




HUNTER ARMS CO., FULTON, NEW Y0BK 

SMITH GUNS SHOOT WELL. 





NEW-MODEL 
AUTOMATIC 
EJECTOR 




We Make 16 Qrades, $17 75 to $300. 



Write for ART CATALOG to 



THE ITHACA GUN CO., Ithaca, N. Y. 

Coast Branch, PHIL B. BEKEART CO., 114 Second St,, San Francisco 



Or 
to 



SHREVE & BARBER CO. 



PIONEER DEALERS 



739 
Market St. 

Send tor 
Catalogue 




521 
Kearny St. 

Mailorders 
a Specialty 



GUNS, AMMUNITION, FISHING-TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS 



SAN FRANCISCO, 



CALIFORNIA. 



NOTHING 




Too 

Good 
for YOU 



When It comes to your Gun, the Best Is NONE TOO GOOD and 
cheapest la the end. ir you do not know why the PARKER Is the 
Bast Gun yoa can bay and the only gan you should Invest In, write 
as to-day and we will tell you all about THE Gun. 



32 Warren St„ New York City. 



30 Cherry St., Meriden, Conn, 



Ballistite Wins! 



Both the High Amateur and General Average 

AND ALSO THE 

Phil B. Bekeart Challenge Trophy--100 Birds- 

At the Second Annual Tournament of the Pacific Coast Trap 
Shooters Association, Ingleside, May 28, 29, 30, were won with 

BALLISTITE. 

If You Have Not Yet Tried It, Do So. You Will Like It. 

BAKER & HAMILTON 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS 
SAN FRANCISCO SACRAMENTO 



, contain 



(lubricates properly the sensitive mechanic 
/With perfect action the reel never fails at a J 
ent. "3 in One "wont gum, dry ( 
; no acid. "3 in One *' prevents 
rust on every part, add- 
ing years to the life, and 
brightness to the beauty 
of even the finest. Good 
for the rod too — preserves 
the wood, promoting plia- 
bility — protects the metal. 
^VTT Good for fisher also— the 
" # M I J delicate, pleasant odor \ 

keeps off mosquilos. 
Try it. AM dealers. Trial buttle sent free. 
Write to 

v.. W. COLE CO. 
128 Washington Life Bid 
t York City 



REAL 
REEL 



BREEDERS' DIRECTORY. 



"HOWARD SHORTHORNS' — QUINTO 
HERD— 77 premiums. California State Fairs 
1902-3-4. Registered cattle of beef ami milking 
famUles for sale. Write us what you want. 
Howard Cattle Co , 206 Sansome Street, San 
Francisco. 



PETER SAXE .v SON. Liok House, S. F..Cal. 
Importers, Breeders and Dealers for past 30 years. 
All varieties Cattle, Horses, Sheep, Hogs. High- 
class breeding stock. Correspondence solicited. 



HOL8TEIN8— BUTTER BRED FAMILIES. 
Work herd; B0% winners at Stat- and county fairs, 
show ring, and every butter content slnoe 1885 In 
California No reservations. Stook near S. F 
F. H. Burke, 30 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 



JERSEYS, HOLSTEIN8 AND DURHAMS. 
Dairy Stock specially. Hogs, Poultry Estab- 
Uahed 1876. William Nlleg & Co.. Irfw Angeles 
Oal. 



VETERINARY. 



ID I*, w m, F*. Bsan. 

M. R. C. V. S., F. E. V. M. 8. 

VETERINARY SURGEON, 

Member of the Royal College of Veterinary 
Surgeons, England; Fellow of the Edlnbur* 
Veterinary Medical Society; Graduate of the New 
Veterinary College, Edinburgh; Veterinary Sur- 
geon to the S. F. Fire Department; Live Stock 
inspoctor forNow Zealand and AustrallanColonlea 
at the port of San Francisco; Professor of Equine 
Medicine, Vetorlnary Surgery, Veterinary Depart- 
ment University of California; Ez-Presldent m 
the California State Veterinary Medical Associa- 
tion: Veterinary Infirmary, Residence and Office, 
San Francisco Veterinary Hospital. 1117 Golden 
Gate Avenue, near Webster St., San Francisco: 
Tnlophone Park 128. 



PEDIGREES TABULATED 

And type written 
Ready for framing. 
Write for prices. 

breeder and SPORTSMAN, 86 Geary Street 
San Franclsoo, Gal. 



AT STUD^ 

Ch. CUBA OP KENWOOD 

(Qlenbelgh Jr.-Stella) 
CUBA JR. 
(Ch. Cuba of Kenwood- Florida) 
One of the highest class Field Trial winners In 
America. Seven wins in nine Trials before be 
was two years old. 

STOCKDALE KENNELS 

R. M. DODOE, Manager, 
Bakersfldd, Kern Co., 
Boarding. Pointer Puppies and well-broken 
Dogs for sale. 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 



Advertisements under this head one cent per word 
per insertion. Caih to accompany order. 



COLLIES 



rpREMENDOUS BARGAINS IN COLLIES. 
1 Send In order and get the very best at bottom 
price. GLEN TANA COLLIE KENNELS, P. 
O. Box 1907 Spokane, Wash. 



IRISH AND SCOTCH TERRIERS. 



TRISH AND SCOTCH TERRIERS FOR SALE. 
x Scottle Puppies sired by Ch. Loyne Ruffian 
and Crimson Rambler Best Irish stock on the 
Coast. Mrs. BRADLEY-DYNE, Saturna P.O.. 
B. C. 



T he Cocker Spaniel 

Its History, Points. 
Standard, Care, 
Training, Etc. 

PRICE, POSTPAID, 50 CENT8 

The instructions on Care, Training, etc., apply 
toother breeds as well as to Cockers, and It Is a 
useful book for tno dog owner. Tells how to 
teach them to perform tricks. 

FOR SALE BY TIIK 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



BLAKE, M0FFITT & T0WNE 



-DEALERS IN- 



65-57-59-61 First Street, S. F. 
Telephone Main 199 

CALIFORNIA 



16 



f July 15, 1905 



TELEPHONE: 

South 640 




we Harness 

J 0RSE BOOTS 



SUCCESSFUL 
CLUBS 



VISO 




AMMUNITION 

Uniform and Reliable. 

'WRITE FOl ILLUSTRATED CATALOQ. 

PACIFIC COAST depot: 

86-88 FIRST ST., 8. F. 




SUCCESSFUL 
CLUBS 



use 



SHOT G UNS 

Keen and Accurate. 



Write for Illustrated Catalog 

PACIFIC coast depot: 



E. E. DRAKE, 



Manager 



JflNCHESm 



WEEK AWARDED 1 HE 



ONLY GRAND PRIZE 

BY THE SUPERIOR JURY AT THE ST. LOUIS EXPOSITION, 1904. 



Du PONT SMOKELESS 

Again tbe Champion. 

Du PONT SMOKELESS 

woo the 

Professional and Amateur Championships 
(or 1904. 

Mr. Fred Gilbert. High Professional. 
Mr. John W.Garrett, High Amateur. 

Why don't you shoot 

Du PONT SMOKELESS? 



C. P. W. BR ANDS. 

SMOKELESS SHOTGUN SHELLS. 

PATTERN 

PERFECTION 

INVINCIBLE 

Loaded with Any Standard Brand of 
Smokeless Powder. 

When ordering from your dealer mention OUR BRANDS 
and kind of Powder wanted. 

We guarantee our loading. 

California Powder Works 

Wells-Fargo Bldg,, 49 Second St 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



At the Ohio State Shoot 

Canton, Ohio, June 14 and 15, 
W. R. Crosby 
using 

New E, C. Improved 

broke 419 straight, 
a real world's record. 
Only powders that are "regular" make 
such records possible. 

LAFLIN & RAND POWDER CO. 



Clabrough, Golcher & Go, 



RUNS 
Sun Goods 



WSend for Catalogue 




FISHING 
Tackle 



538 MARKET STREET. S. F. 



These are the Brands of 

factory ...eun I o 
loaded .OrlLL L9 

PACIFIC 

CHALLENGE 

SUPERIOR 

EXCELSIOR 



VOI*. XLVII. No. 8. 
3 8 GEARY STREET. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 22, 1905. 



SUBSCRIPTION 
THREE DOLLARS A TEAR 




&\xc gveebev mttr grafts man 



IJULY 22, 1906 




PHOTOGRAPH of DAN PATCrW:56 !MNE6rHjf WONDERFUL MILES 



This Engraving was made from a Photograph taken of Dan Patch in one of his Marvelous Speed Exhibitions. It shows Dan Flying Through The Air with every foot off of the ground, and 
is as natural and life-like as if you saw him in one of his sensational miles. You will notice that Dan 1*81011 is pacing in his smooth and majestic manner, while the three runners are urged 
on by voice and whip in their tremendous efforts necessary to keep up with Dan in his record-breaking miles. This picture shows exactly the way Dau makes his exhibition miles. The 
runners are used to stimulate Dan to greater efforts, because he goes faster when he has a horse to beat. Dan wants and enjoys a close and exciting race, and he will not pace his fastest clip 
unless he is in company. No trotter or pacer can go fast enough so we use high bred running horses. eS-Wotch For Dan's Exhibition Dates This Fall. He Is Faster Than Ever. 

DO YOU WANTrfMORE SPEED? 

Dao Patch Made Eight World Records After Eating "International Stock Food" Six Months. It Always Gives A 
Good Appetite, Extra Strength, Endurance, Courage And Nerve Force Which Is Sure To Give Your Horse More Speed. 
You Cannot Afford To Start Your Race Horse This Year Without Feeding "International Stock Food" Every Day. 

DAN PATCH 1:56 WEATS 

"INTERNATIONAL STOCK FOOD" 



a*-3 FEEDS 



F" O R 



ONE CENT 



We feed "International Stock Food" every day to our stallions Dan Patch 1:56 Directum 2:05/4 Arion 2:01% Roy 

Wilkes 2:06/2 Buttonwood 2:17 Directum Jr. Also to our One Hundred Brood Mares and to all of their colts because it gives 

them better digestion and assimilation, keeps the blood pure and rich and thoroughly strengthens the entire system and prevents disease. 
Signed by M. W. Savage, Proprietor of "International Stock Food Farm" and also of "International Stock Food Co." 



< 



IT MAKES EXTRA SPEED 

Blackstone, Mass. 
International Stock Food Co. 

Dear Sirs: — I am a constant user of 
your "International Stock Food" and I 
have no doubt that it helped Redondale 
reduce his record last year to 2 : 12. Please 
send me pictures of your stallions. 

Yours respectfully, 

DAN J. KELLY. 



MONROE SALISBURY reports. SPLENDID FOR TROTTING STALLIONS 



M. W. Savage. Yonkers, N. Y. 

Dear Sir: — Your "International Stock 
Food" helped me a great deal in keeping 
Consuella S. 2:01% and Judge Green 2:09 ' 
strong this year, both sired by your stallion 
Directum 2:05}{. I think Consuella S. can 
trot in 2:05 and Judge Green can beat her. 
Have you any Directum colts to sell or lease? 
Yours truly, MONROE SALISBURY. 



Banksville, Neb 
International Stock Food Co. 

Gentlemen: — I have used "Interna- 
tional Stock Food" for over three years and 
find it very satisfactory. I tested it on a 
standard young trotter and never saw a 
colt grow and develop so rapidly. He is 
< two years old and weighs 1050 pounds. 
? Yours very truly, B. W. BENJAMIN. 



30 CENTS WILL °£X™ MAKE YOU 

It is nothing uncommon for a months use of "International Stock Food" to add $50.00 to $100.00 
to the selling price of a colt or horse. Its use will always make you big money. 



.oo 



International Slotlc Food" with the World Famous Line-3 FEEDS for ONE CENT— is known 

everywhere. It is prepared from high class powdered Roots, Herbs. Seeds and Barks and 
Purifies the Blood, Tones Dp and permanently Strengthens the Entire System, Cures and 
Prevents Disease and is a remarkable »id to Digestion and Assimilation so that each animal 
will obtain 20 lo_25 per cent, more nutrition from all grain eaten. We positively guarantee 
that one ton o( "International Stock Food" will make you $360 net profit, over its cost in growing 
colts or in strengthening the system and saving grain for older horses. The use of 100 lbs. 
will make you a net .profit of $18.00 in a saving of grain in your regular feeding. It keeps 
horses strong and vigorous and gives them more nerve power, which produces more speed. 

It will make your stallions surer foal getters and cause broodmares to raise better 
colts because it increases the flow of healthful milk. "International Stock Foo*" is splendid 
for all breeding animals and is Equally Good For Horses and Colts and all other kinds 
ol stock. It is perfectly harmless even if taken into the human system. 



*»" The us* ol "International Stock Food" lor 30 days will often increase the selling price ol a colt or 
horse $50 to $100. Be sure and test it before sending your horse to the sale ring or before a 
buyer comes to your barn. Its use will make you more money than anything you ever fed 
your horses. It is especially valuable to a horse with a "poor appetite" or in a run down 
condition. It will quickly strengthen and fatten the poorest horse on earth. 

"International Stock Food" is universally acknowledged as the leading High Class Medi- 
cated Stock Food of the world, to be fed in small amounts as an addition to grain in order 
to give better digestion and more vitality. It is endorsed by over Two Million Horse Owners 
and One Hundred Thousand Dealers who always sell it on a 'Spot Cash Guarantee" to 
Refund Your Money if it ever fails for any recommended use. We guarantee International 
Stock Food" to Save 3 Quarts of Oats Every Day for Each Work, Carriage or Driving Horse 
and to keep them healthy, strong and glossy, because it greatly helps digestion and assimil- 
ation. A practical test on your horses will prove every claim we make. Ask Your Dealer. 



5 LARGE LITHOGRAPHS . FREE 

We Will Be Pleased To Mail You Absolutely Free With Postage Prepaid B@"5 Large Colored Lithographs. Each 
Picture Is Made From A Photograph of The Horse Size of Each 21 By 28 Inches And Printed In Six Brilliant Colors. 

One of DAN PATCH 1:56... .One of DIRECTUM 2:05^. ...One of ARION 2:07K ».One of ROY WILKES 2:06^ 
AND ONE OF DAN PATCH AND THE RUNNERS AS SHOWN IN, THE ABOVE ENGRAVING. 

•S-IN WRITING YOC MUST NAME THIS PAPER and ALSO STATE HOW MANY HORSES, Etc., YOU OWN OR CARE FOR.-** 



Largest Stock Food Factory In the World. 
Capital Paid in <2, 000,000. 



Address at once: International Stock Food Co., Minneapolis, Minn 



Also. ...TORONTO, CA 



ADA. 



July 22, 1905] 



3 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

F. W. KELLEV, PROPRIETOR. 

Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

— OPTICS — 

36 QEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O BOX 2300. 
Telephone: Black 686. 



ermg- One Tear S3. Six Hunt ha 81. 78, Three months 91 
STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 
. Money snould be sent by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
iddressed to F. W. Kki.i.kv 36 Oeary St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee 
of good faith. 



San Francisco, Saturday, July 22, 1905. 



SWEET MARIE WAS BEATEN by Tiverton in 
their match race at Btlment Paik, Philadelphia 
last Wednesday, and according to the telfgrapbic 
account of the event which appears on aDOtber page, 
the Galileo Rex gelding bad a rather easy race. The 
track which is controlled by the BelmoDt DriviDg 
Club has not been raced over by the fastest trotters 
and pacers as its record was 2:llo for trotters prior to 
this race. Tiverton reduced it to 2:10£ the first heat 
and again to 2:0"! iD t Qe second and final heat, a very 
fast mile at this time of year, aithough both he aod 
Sweet Marie worked in 2:08 only last week. The race 
was a very disappointing one as the mare broke in 
both heats when put to her speed, and was evidently 
out of "shape or condition. It is a peculiar fact tha* 
match races seldom result in close fighting contests, 
and they are generally unsatisfactory. There ia no 
particular reason why this should'be true, but it is 
nevertheless. That Sweet Marie should be beaten 
easily in 2:104 and 2:07} is absurd unless the daughter 
of McKinney is decidedly off, which we believe must 
be ihe case. At any rate we are not going to accuse 
Alta McDonald of pulling her, or suggestthat the mare 
be taken away from him as was done last year when 
Robert Smith lost a heat or two with her, as we 
believe that like Mr. Smith he would have won if he 
could. No horse, no matter how rugged and powerful 
can trot his or her best every day . There are times 
when they are not right, and we presume Sweet Marie 
was not in condition last Wednesday. Thesi great 
trotteri meet again at Readville, August 2d, and the 
chances are a much better contest will be witnessed. 
It may be that Tiverton is a better horse than the 
California trotter this season, but we will have to be 
con vinced of this fact by a race where he finishesin 
front of har when the time is faster than obe mare's 
present record. We hope they may meet on equaj 
terms at Read ville next month. Should both be in 
perfect shape there will be a horse raceand the winner 
will have a record of 2:04 or better even though the 
season is rather early for such fast time. 



THE NEXT MEETING on the brief California Cir- 
cuit this year will be the annual meeting of the 
Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders Association at 
Santa Rosa. It will open on Wednesday, August 
16th, and thore is every prospect of its success be- 
yond any meeting held this year. The list of entries 
in all the class races are large, and in addition there 
will be four colt races decided which are already 
causing a great deal of talk among horsemen gener- 
ally, and which will result in some very low records 
being made. In the three-year-old divisions especially 
is fast time expected. Several three-year-old pacers 
are beating 2:15 in their work, and the three-year-old 
trotters are doing so well that there is a chance that 
Zombro's record of 2:13 made in 1805 may be equalled. 
The two-year-olds, both pacers and trotters, are also 
a high-class lot and will furnish some of the best con- 
tests of the meeting. Santa Rosa track was never in 
better shape than it is at the present time Lessee 
Frank Turner says it will be just as safe and fast as 
he can make it, and as he is an expert at putting 
trncks in order, there is every probability that tbu 
track record of 2:00 will be broken during the meet- 
ing. We advise every horseman in California to be 
in Santa Rosa during the Breeders meeting, and as a 
friendly warning would suggest that they engage 
rooms immediately, as while there will be accommo- 
dations for all, the best rooms will be taken by the 
time the meeting opens. 



SIX $1000 STAKES are offered by the Arizona 
Territorial Fair Association for trotting and 
paoing events at the first territorial fair which opens 
at Phoenix, December 4th and continues during the 



week. A large number of $400 purses will be offered 
later. The Arizona Fair Association has a new $50,000 
plant, and will give one of the most unique expositions 
ever given in the United States Special rates will be 
made by both the Southern Pacific and the Santa Fe 
railroads, and as the weather of Arizona is ideal in 
December, the fair will draw thousands of people and 
be a great success. The now track at the fair grounds 
is cne of the best in America, so that fast time may be 
expected. California horsemen, especially thoseliving 
in the southern end of the "State, will find the trip to 
Phoenix a very pleasant and not expensive one. Six 
$1000 purses, three for trotters and three for pacers, 
with ten or a dozen additional purses of $400 each 
makes up a program that is very attractive. A new 
and novel condition governing these stakes is that 
while they do not close finally until Nov. 1st, entries 
can be made at any time previous to that date, and 
a»i// records made after the day on which entiy is made, 
will not he a bur. This should attract a large list of 
early entries, and as payments are but $15 at the time 
of entry, $15 November 1st, and $20 the night before 
the race, the loss will be very light if one's horse goes 
wrong before November 1st, which is after all racing 
is over in other parts of the United States. We advise 
all our readers who own or are racing trotters or 
pacers this year, to read the advertisement of the 
Arizona Territorial Fair carefully, and send to this 
office or to W. N. Tiffany, Secretary, Phoenix, 
Arizona, for entry blanks. 



A FREE FOR ALL PACE has been opened by 
*» the California State Agricultural Society in place 
of the one that was advertised to close July 10th but 
failed to fill. The amount of the purse is $000, and as 
this amount secured the best race of the Los Angeles 
meeting for this class of horses it should attract 
sufficient entries at the State Fair to make a good 
contest. There are more than a dozen pacers in train- 
ing at the presant time in California all of which have 
a chance to win this contest. Tbey are Zolock 2:05}, 
Edwin S, 2:08, Dr. W. 2:08}, Tidal Wave 2:09, Vision 
2:09}, Jonesa Basler 2:11}, Bonnie Ailse 2:08J, Virginia 
2:09}, ML-s Idaho 2:103, Ira 2:10$, Daedalion 2:10, Tom 
Ca--neal 2:08}, Alone 2:09}, and several others. While 
Zolock is looked upon by some as almost invincible, 
there is no certainty that he can beat the others every 
time he starts, and then he may be shipped East after 
the Santa Rosa meeting. With five or six of the best 
of the others entered the State Fair free for all pace 
will be one of the best contests ever placed on the 
program. Entries close August 1st. 



TPHE PERSON who has been reporting the harness 
1 race meeting at Windsor this week for the As- 
sociated Press is "a bird." He tells about the races, 
but fails to say what horses started and what time was 
made. He gives the information that Danube won 
the 2:17 trot in straight heats, but don't say how fast 
any of them were, or what horses he beat. In the 
account of another race he stated that Bonnie Wilkes 
was distanced in the second heat and High Seven had 
a hard time beating the flag, but no mention is made 
of any other horses or the. time. Such a thing as a 
summary is doubtless an unknown quantity to the 
individual who is doing the Windsor races ?or the 
Associated Press. He probably views the races from 
the three-quarter pole and sees nothing but the last 
hor3es at the finish. He is a bird. 



Answers to Correspondents. 

DR. Wm B. CLOWE, Walla vValla— Ilo Ho 2:15 was 
bred by Mr. W. E. Meek of Hay wards, and is by his 
horse Welcome 2:104 out of Rosemary by Nutwood 
Wilkes 2:16}, second dam Hybla by Director. He is a 
bay gelding with both hind ankles whito. He was 
foaled in 1898, and a picture of him appeared in the 
Breeder and Sportsman when he was a three- 
year-old in 1901, and again in November 1903, aftor 
he took his present record. There are many instances 
of the same name being given two or moro horses. 
Under the rules of registration now in force, the 
name of a stallion once registered cannot bo duplicated- 
Ilo Ilo 2:15 is a gelding and not registered, and there 
was nothing to prevent his owner claiming the name 
when starting him In a race, even though you did 
register a colt by Alexis, foaled in 1897, by that cog- 
nomen. Perhaps, if you could give us the name of 
the man to whom you sold Iloilo 31434 we might be 
able to trace tho present whereabouts of the horse, if 
alive. 

One of tho features for State Fair week at Sacra- 
mento will be a driving parade one evening. The 
Sacramento Driving Club has the matter in chargo 
and it is believed that with the eighty members and 
many outsiders who have volunteered to take part, a 
very interesting parade will be arranged. 



Harness Game Suffering in the East. 

On the other side of the Rocky Mountains harness 
racing is being Injured" by the anti-betting laws that 
have been passed to stop the continuous running 
meetings that have become obnoxious to the general 
public. J. L. Hervey writes as follows in the Chicago 
Iiecord-IIeiuld about the situation: 

Horse racing is an extremely expensive sport; the 
cost of production of . high-class harness horse is 
great; the cost of assembling hundreds of them to 
race for purses of four or five figures is immense. As 
a business proposition it seldom breaks even, and 
without tho betting angle impossible except in con- 
junction with fairs and expositions. 

The public has always realized this and has tolerated 
limited betting in many localities where prohibitory 
legislation existed because of it. This applies, how- 
ever, only to meetings where the betting has been a 
minor detail, as it has always been of harness racing. 
When it comes to be the "whole thing," as it has 
become 10 the "running game," the complexion 
changes; what the public tolerated it then d inlands 
the suppression of. 

That the volume of betting at harness race meetings 
was ever sufficient to constitute any mt nace to public 
morality is not to be believed, and, had no other form 
of racing been pursued, that there would now be any 
anti-betting or poolselling law In any states can 
scarcely bo considered possible. It has been the out- 
rageous abuse of the betting privileges at the running 
tracks and their not infrequent open and insolent de- 
fiance of law or order and decency that have precipi- 
tated the legislation which is paralyzing racing of all 
kinds, under which the innocent as well as the guilty 
are being put out of business. 

The condition is a vexatious and a disquieting one. 
Just what the outcome will be no prophet can foresee 
A reasonable betting law would resolve the difficulty. 
But there are these obstacles in the way of such laws 
In the first place, while, eventually, most, if not all, 
of the United States will enact them, they are not yet 
ready to— the "time is not ripe." In the second place, 
a betting law that would be regarded as reasonable 
by reasonable horsemen would never satisfy the run- 
ning faction— and as long as they cannot get what 
they want it is plain that they can and will prevent 
anything else. And there ycu have it. 

Palmer Clark, of the Inter-Ocean, also notes the con- 
ditions existing and attributes them to the same cause. 
He says: 

That the gambling feature associated with racing 
has been conducive to this undesirable condition there 
can be no mistake, and while I have never boosted 
the wild speculative features connected with the 
game, yet all sane people must sooner or later come to 
the conclusion that the spirit that gambled on the 
existence of a northwest passage or a continent be- 
yond the seas, as when America was discovered, can- 
not be restrained by legislation or hampered by the 
restrictions of the long-haired hypocrites who never 
discovered anything and never will. 

Do not let me be misunderstood; there is nothing in 
this that would infer that I am in favor of the mush- 
room cigar store poolroom, where the youth of the 
city, and even women, can be bunkoed out of their 
hard-earned pittance and driven to the many crimes 
that attend tho desperation that follows, or the con- 
tinual farce of racing horses the year round In cities 
where the racing and horses are made simply the 
mode and paraphernalia of the gamblers, and subser- 
vient to them. 

My contention is that the legislators of the country 
should pass limited pool laws restricted to racing 
inclosures for a limited period, where the owner who 
risks $50 entrance fee to win a purse of $500, which is 
the same element of speculation that adheres to the 
buying of a corner lot, or any other speculation, can 
have the privilege of backing his horse for a bigger 
purse in the pools if he is so inclined, or where the 
man who can afford to raise horses can have tho 
privilege of backing his judgment of the other man's 
horse's ability. Such speculation rarely has any more 
demoralizing effect than will attend any other line of 
human effort. 

The breeding of the American light harness horse is 
a business of far too great importance to be allowed to 
die out through the machinations of race track man- 
agers who consider nothing save their avaricious 
natures, and the American people, as reflected in the 
wisdom of its great agricultural population, ihe best 
and most progressive element, cannot afford to sit idly 
by and see any such disaster. 

By all moans every man who owns, breeds or loves 
the light harness horses should spend a little time and 
energy this fall to get to his individual legislator and 
see that tho matter is presented in I ts true light. 

Do not ridicule tho well meaning efforts of those 
who are honestly trying for the moral uplifting of the 
people — such action speaks well for those so engaged, 
but see to it that thoy are properly informed of the 
true conditions. 



Georgo A. Bain, the well known bluo-grass auction- 
eer, has been elected secretary of the Kentucky State 
Fair with offices in Lexington. Mr. Bain has a very 
wide acquaintance, especially in this state, and has set 
out resolutely to make the state fair a permanent 
Lexington event. 



Many men aro still looking for handsome buggy 
horses, well broken, high-headed, well finished and in 
good Mesh. If a little bit of speed can be shown the 
price will be higher than if ii cannot. 

Jackson's Napa Soda la sold in every city, town 
and hamlet in the State. 



4 



[July 22, 1906 



His Last "Copy." 

The following news items written for the BBEEDEK 
and Sportsman by Blaine S. McMahan, who was 
killed at Fresno, July 12tb, by a train running over 
him, were found In his box at the Grand Central Hotel 
and are probably the last he ever wrote before meet- 
ing his untimely death: 

Al McDonald has had the misfortune to have one of 
his best horses go lame for him. This one is the bay 
paoing gelding Little Jib owned by Fleury Gomnaet of 
San Francisco. When he was shipped from Pleasanton 
Little Jib was in great shape and was thought to be a 
2:08 horse, so it seems unfortunate that he should go 
wrong before he had a chance at the money. 

The big bay gelding Argyle by Charles Derby raced 
very dissapointingly at Los Angeles for J. D. Springer. 
This horse trained well at Pleasanton and Mr.Sprlnger 
thought he was about the best thing in his stable but 
he failed to show his accustomed speed last week and 
was behind the money in both of his races. 

While warming up for his race at Los Angeles the 
pacer Doctor J. by Doctor Hicks, owned by E A, 
Servisand in the string ol Fred Chad bourne, wrenched 
himself severely in one of his shoulders and since has 
been unfit to race. He is rounding to in good shape 
and will be ready to start for the money in a week or 
so. 

The pacing gelding Tom Carneal 2:08} by Diablo 
2:09} out of Mountain Maid (also dam of Kenneth C. 
2:17) has been sold by S. K. Trefry to Mr. Bransford 
of Salt Lake City, Utah. Mr. Bransford drove Ttm 
Carneal an easy mile in 2:11 at Los Angeles and the 
big pacer will probably be seen at the matinees in his 
new home. 

The great broodmare Grace Kaiser, dam of Coney 
2:02 and several others, has been sold to James Coffin 
of San Francisco. Grace Kaiser has a strikingly 
handsome black filly at her side by Zolock 2:06 and is 
thought to be in foal to him again. 

Edwin S 2:08} paced a first class race against Zolock 
and Kelly Briggs at Los Angeles and will be a hard 
horse to beat at Fresno. Previous to his race last 
week he had not shown a mile better than 2:10 and 
was hardly ready for a hard race, yet he was right 
there three times in 2:08} or better and paced the last 
halves of two miles In 1:01}. 

. The boys are already saying that the McKinney 
gelding Adam G. 2:14} is surely another George G. 
2:06} and it does look as if he is about the highest 
class new trotter of the season. He Is a perfectly 
gaited, level-headed trotter, that races like an old- 
timer and he showed in his race last week that 2:10 
would be easy for him. This fellow was bred by Prof < 
E. P. Heald of San Francisco and is now owned by 
J. T. and Willard Zibbell. 

After his two smashing races at Los Angeles last 
week there was quite a little talk of sending Zolock 
2:06 East this fall and It may be that the fast son of 
McKinney will be seen at Cincinnati, Lexington and 
Memphis. There will be a class for him at these 
meetings and if be races there as well as he did at 
Los Angeles he will give the Grand Circuiters a good 
run for the money. 

Death of Douglas Cone. 

Douglas S. Cone, only son of Mrs. Anna R. Cone 
and the late J. S. Cone, died July 16th, at the Palace 
Hotel, San Francisco, after a brief illness, of typhoid 
pneumonia He was 38 years old and bad been a 
prominent citizen of Butte county eyer since attaining 
his majority.. 

He was born at the family home near Red Bluff and 
resided nearly all his life on the home place, known as 
the Cone Ranch, where he and his wife formerly Miss 
Lewis of San Francisco have dispensed a delightful 
hospitality. He was very prominent in the social and 
business life of the community, having been active in 
m iny new enterprises and a leader in all movements 
for the improvement of livestock of all kinds, particu- 
'arly horses. He purchased the stallion Kinney Lou 
2:07^ as a colt and sold him to Budd Doble, his present 
owner. His herd uf Hereford cattle was one of the 
largest and best on the Coast. 

In 1900 he was a delegate to the Republican National 
Convention which met at Philadelphia and nominated 
McKinley and Roosevelt. For many years he was a 
Director of the District Agricultural Society for 
Tehama county and took a leading part in all county 
and district fairs 

Mr. Cone's illness dates from last winter, when he 
was thrown from a buggy while returning from a 
trip to the Navajo" mine and suffered a compound 
fracture of his right leg. For some unexplained reason 
the bones refused to knit and he was compelled to under- 
. go many painful operations. He had been undergoing 
treatment in Lane Hospital, San Francisco, shortly 
before his fatal illness, and was still under the sur- 
geon's care when he contracted the disease which 
caused his death. 



The Butler String. 

The horses in James Butler's East View Farm string 
left New York for Windsor last week. Before they 
left De Ryder stepped most of the members of the 
string some moderately fast miles, and after they have 
raced at Windsor this week they should be ready and 
able to hold their own with the other horses entered 
down the "big line." Direct View 2:08J, who will in 
all probability be the farm's starter in the 2:08 classes 
during the early part of the season, was given two 
miles last Friday in 2:10} and 2:10}. Consuella S. 
2:07J has not beaten 2:15, as she is not to be started 
at the earlier meetings. Fred Direct, the M. and M. 
candidate, was given two miles Saturday in 2:14A and 
2:15, easily, while Danube, the brown stallion by 
Direcho, son of Direct 2:05}, also eligible to the slow 
classes, trotted in 2. 13 and 2:14, with the middle halves 
each in 1:05J. Mamie R. 2:15} trotted in 2:13} on Tues- 
day and has 2:00 speed. She is the best gaited trotter 
in the stable, and if she proves to be game when the 
test comes, should win a number of races. Minter 
2:28}, the Expedition mare, worked two miles on Fri- 
day in 2:13 J and 2:14. Aristo2:08 and Princess Athel 
2:14, two trotters that were not taken to California 
last winter, have not been asked to step much faster 
than 2:20 as yet, as they will not be raced till later 
in the season. There are three pacers in the stable, 
and while they all wear the hobbles, they have shown 
that they have enough speed to warrant starting them 
against the best sidewheelers eligible to their classes. 
Bolivar 2:21 was given two miles on Friday in 2:10 
and 2:07}, while Josie 2:16 stepped heats in the same 
time. Madam Direct, a black three-year-old entered 
to start first at Buffalo, worked two miles in 2:18 easily. 



Breeding of McNeer. 

Editor Breeder and Sportsman — Dear Sir: 
In your iesue of July 1st, in a notice of the approach- 
ing auction sale of Mr. E. C. Peart, of Colusa, (see 
page 5) the breeding of McNeer's dam is given as by 
Silver King which is incorrect. McNeer was bred 
and raised by the veteran horseman, Suel Harris, of 
Yuba City, Sutter county, Cal., who sold him in his 
six-year-old form to the Knaggs Bros., of Meridian, 
same county , whose great misfortune it was to lose 
him by death less than a year ago at seven years of 
age. He was by the great McKinney, first dam Viola 
by Antevolo 2:19.], second dam Esmeralda (dam of 
Don Lowell 2:14}, Director H. 2:27 and others) by 
Brigadier, third dam Lady Slatterry by Cal. Dexter 
(son of Whipple's Hambletonian 725 and Kate Leslie 
by Gray Messenger 155) fourth dam Empress by 
Langford (sire of dam of Liliian Wilkes 2:i7}) by 
Williamson's Belmont. 

It is thus plain that McNeer was one of the stoutest 
bred sons of his illustrious sire, and his Individuality 
was fully up to his royal breeding. He stood 16 hands 
in height and weighed fully 1200 pounds and was a 
horse of great strength, substance and symmetry. 
He was also a very impressive and promising sire and 
his death will prove a decided loss to the breeding 
interests of the section where he was owned, for when 
the size, style, speed and tractability of bis sons and 
daughters become known, they will be eagerly sought 
after. This note is not prompted by any personal 
interest in Mr. Peart's sale or stock, but by an inti- 
mate acquaintance with and great admiration for this 
grand young sire. I have not the pleasure of even an 
acquaintance with Mr. Peart. I am yours truly, 

C. W. T. 




Jupiter B. 2:13} by Gen. Beverly 
Trained and Driven by W. G. Durfee 



Last Two Days at Pueblo. 

July 10— Trotting, 2:50 olass, purse $400. 

Rosalind, bl m by Stam B (Hayes) 12 11 

Ura Bell, b m by Happy Heir (Sproule) 2 13 3 

Billy S., br g by Tbos. York (Smith) 3 3 2 2 

Tlme-2:25'/ 2 , 2:22%, 2:21M, 2:26%- 

Pacing, speoial, purse $300. 

JessC , s g by Electwood (Franks) 1 1 1 

Joe Younger, bl g by Joe Young (Hayes) 3 2 3 

Young Hal. b h by Hal Dillard (Frost) 2 3 4 

Lady Elgin, r m by Baron Tosty (Johnson) 4 4 2 

Time— 2:14, 2:19%, 2:19. 

July 11— Paoing, 2:35 class, purse $500. 

Halllna Morgan, b m by Duplex Hal (Frost) 1 1 1 

Grandma Jefferson, b m by Jefferson (Stellar) 2 2 4 

George Forker, b g by Phaimont (Sproule) 3 3 2 

Pueblo Girl, bl m by Harris (Loomls) 4 4 3 

Time— 2:16«, 2:175*, 2:22. 

Trotting, 2:13 class, purse $500. 

Phyllis, oh m by Superior (Davis) 1 1 1 

Nordtoa, b m by Agamemnon (Loomls) 2 2 2 

Iosa, b m by Phllomldes (Stellar) 3 3 3 

Time— 2-.23H, 2:22M. 2:22^- 



Tbe Detroit correspondent of the Chicago Horseman 
in writing about the horses working at Grosse Point 
track has the following to say about a California 
trotter: Lady Zombro, the M. and M. candidate for 
which the rail birds were all waiting, did not show 
her alleged two-minute speed, working easily in 2:16, 
however. A lot of others, including stake candidates, 
went easy miles around 2:20. There is a lot of gossip 
going the rounds about this Lady Zombro, by the 
way. That she is for sale is no secret, and Trainer 
Hodges has talked to several well-known Detroiters, 
offering to show them a mile that would make their 
hair stand on end. They provided him with their 
addresses and promised to be within call, yet the call 
has not yet arrived. The mare Is going sound, too, so 
the Detroiters are guessing without having yet hit on 
any satisfactory answer. 



Tiverton Beats Sweet Marie. 



Philadelphia, July 19. — The speedy New York 
trotting gelding, Tiverton 2:04}, easily defeated Sweet 
Marie 2:04J in a $5000 match race today on the track 
of the Belmont Driving Club. Tiverton won In two 
straight heats. 

About 5000 persons saw the two Grand Circuit stars 
race. Sweet Marie drew the pole. They were sent 
away on even terms in the first heat. 

Tiverton set the pace and before the quarter pole 
was reached had a slight lead. As Sweet Marie 
passed the quarter pole Bhe broke and Tiverton took 
the pole. At the half mile post Tiverton led by 
several lengths. Sweet Marie again broke at the 
three-quarter pole and Tiverton passed under the 
wire well in hand and two lengths in the lead. His 
time for the mile was 2:10}, lowering the track record 
for trotters in a race one secend. 

Tiverton led at the quarter in the second heat and 
increased it to three lengths at the half-mile post. 
Going to the three-quarter pole Sweet Marie picked 
up some of the lost ground and both trotters came 
into the stretch almost on even terms. The spectators 
looked for a close finish, but at the eighty-yard pole 
the mare broke and lost her chance to win. Tiverton 
came under the wire In a fine stride several lengths in 
the lead. His time was 2:07|, which places the track 
record at a figure hard to beat. 



Scott Hudson Says. 

Detroit, Mich., July 23, 1904. 

F. A. Wilooxson, Tiffin, Ohio. 

Dear Sir:— I send you herein my check for one dozen bottles of 
your liniment. The liniment arrived all right and we are using 
It with good results. Yours very truly, Scott Hudson. 



July 22, 1905] 



5 




The horses bred by the Occidental Land and Im- 
provement Company of Sharon, Cal., are large, hand- 
some, sound and serviceable. A consignment of thirty 
of them will be sold by Fred H. Chase & Co. at 1732 
Market street next Monday evening. 



Rosalind by Stain 6. now carries a record of 2:21 J, 
made in a winning race at Pueblo, Colorado. 

It is said that Stanley Dillon 2:0"i will not be a 
member of Ed Geers' string after the close of the 
Detroit meeting next week. 



B. S. Dillon started twice at the New Haven, Con- 
necticut, meeting the last week in June, and won odo 
race and was second in the other. 



The two-year-old division of the American Horse 
Breeder Futurity, for foals of 1903, will be trotted on 
Tuesday, Aug. 22d, at the Grand Circuit meeting at 
Readville, Mass. 

A four-year old pacing filly by Star Pointer 1:591 
from Javelin 2:08J worked a mile in 2:16| at Cleveland 
the other day. As she looks very promising she will 
be saved over until next year. 



Strathway 2:19, after a fair season at Pleasanton, 
was shipped Thursday of this week to his owner, 
Graham E. Babcock at Coronado, where there are 
nearly twenty mares waiting to be bred to him. 



August 9th is the date set for the dispersal sale of 
the standard bred horses colts and fillies owned by 
Mr. E. C. Peart of Colusa. Many fine young animals 
are to be sold. Send to Mr. Peart for a catalogue. 



There is considerable talk of a race track being 
built at Porterville, Tulare county. There are many 
horses bred and owned in that section that would be 
trained at home if there were a track in that locality. 



At Liberty ville, Illinois, July 4th four races were 
given. The fir9t event was the 2:15 pace. It was won 
by Billy A. a bay gelding by Fast Nation owned by 
Mr. J. C. Adams of Phoenix, Arizona. The best time 
was 2:18. 

Don't forget the auction sale of standard bred 
h«rses at Fred H.Chase & Co.'s salesyard, Monday 
evening next, July 24th. This sale will begin at 8 
o'clock. Several well staked and promising colts are 
to be sold. 

Murray Howe, Secretary of the Memphis Associa- 
tion, is out with two $ti000 purses for the meeting 
opening October 16th. These purses are for 2:09 
class pacers and 2:14 class trotters, and entries close 
Monday, the 24th inst. 



The colt stakes of 1908, opened by the Agricultural 
Association of San Benito county, have closed with 
six entries, made respectively by Robert Orr, R. P. 
Lathrop, George E. Shaw, Raymond Mead, Irvine 
Hall and Frank Blessing. 



The Rose Hotel at Pleasanton has again changed 
hands. The new proprietor is F. L. Skaggs a well and 
favorably known hotel man who has been connected 
with the St. James at San Jose and the St. Nicholas 
and Manhattan hotels of San Francisco. 



There is a rumor to the effect that the first two 
minute horse, Star Pointer 1:591, will be brought to 
California this fall for the purpose of making a season 
with him here next spring. He made the season at 
Two Minute Farm this year at a fee of $100. 



During the Detroit meeting next week Lou Dillon 
and Major Delmar will trot an exhibition race for a 
gold cup. Mr. Billings, who owns both horses, will 
drive the mare and his friend Mr. Devereux will pilot 
the gelding. It will be an interesting exhibition. 



Hallock M.| a bay pacer by Hal B. 2:04|, won the 
2:15 pace at Johnstown, Pa., July 7th, and took a 
record of 2:15$. Hal B. is the stallion that made an 
early season at Los Angeles this year, and was after- 
wards sold to August Erickson of Portland, Oregor. 

Inferna, the chestnut pacer by Diablo, dam Biscari 
by Director, that took a record of 2:17 at Billings, 
Montana, last year, has paced In 2:12 in his work this 
season over the Great Falls track and will be started 
in all the big stakes for the fast pacing classes on the 
Montana circuit. 

The report which has been circulated saying that 
Nora McKlnney has been lame is not true. Mr. Frank 
B. Simpson, manager of the Empire City Farm, writes 
The Horse World that Nora McKlnney is not lame 
nor has she ever been lame since she was purchased 
by the Empire City Farm. 



An early report indicates that there will be some 
thirteen hoises left in the M . & M. when all the checks 
are in for the July payment. For the Chamber of 
Commerce there will be, it is thought, twelve 
starters. This will make the usual fields for both of 
these big events. The indications now are that the 
quality of the horses are better than last year. 

A dapple gray gelding by Strathway, sire of Toggles 
2:08J, John Caldwell 2:111, etc., is offered for sale In 
our ad vertlslng columns. The owner has had to go 
East, and has left horse, buggy and harness for sale 
with Thos. Kinney at the Fashion Stables. Read the 
description of this horse in the advertisement. He is 
a good one and can be had at a very reasonable figure. 



The Morgan stock is having a regular boom over 
East, and Is bringing good prices. Several of the 
horses and mares to be sold by Fred H. Chase & Co., 
Monday evening next, are rich in Morgan blood. 
They were bred by C. E. Need ham of Bellota, Cal. 



J. B. Stetson, the well known trainer, who is now ai 
Portland and will race a string of horses over the 
North Pacific Circuit, writes that he will winter in 
California this year. He states that he was near to 
freezing in Denver last winter, where there was zero 
weather for six weeks at one stretch, with the mercury 
as low as 17 below at times. 



The old established firm, the O. F. Willey Company, 
has the best line of fine carriages, buggies, speed vehi- 
cles, etc., ever seen in San Francisco. This firm is 
agent for Brewster & Co. of New York, C. S. Caffrey 
of Camden, New Jersey, and other makers of high- 
class goods. Their place of business Is 1622 Market 
street and 23 Hayes street, under the St. Nicholas 
Hotel. 

What is supposed to be the biggest horse in this 
country is Royal Prince, now on exhibition at Dream- 
land, Coney Island. He arrived from Jamestown, 
N. Y., on Monday. Royal Prince is a dapple gray, 
over nineteen and a half hands high. He is five years 
old and weighs 3700 pounds. His sire was a Percheron 
weighing 1500 pounds, and his dam was of Arabian 
stock, weight 1700 pounds. 



Tom Carneal 2:08$ was sold during the Los Angeles 
meeting to Mr. J. S. Bransford of Salt Lake City, who 
will use him in matinees there. Tom Carneal is by 
Diablo 2:09£, and his dam is the great broodmare 
Mountain Maid bv Cresco that is the dam of that good 
three-year-old colt Kenneth C. 2:17 by McKinney. 
Mountain Maid has two foals by Stair B. 2:111 that 
are very promising. 

C. A. Durfee, of Oakland, and Claude Jones, of 
Modesto, returned from Los Angeles this week where 
they had been in attendance on the meeting of the 
Harness Horse Association. Although both gentle- 
men picked more losers than winners they say thb 
meeting was one of the best they ever attended. 
When the losers find no cause for complaint the rac- 
ing must have been first class, and the meeting con- 
ducted just about right. 



W. T. Harris of Oakland is the owner of a bay 
gelding by Bay Bird that stands 17 hands high and 
can trot a quarter in 34 seconds. The gelding has 
been very ill with pinkeye, but Is recovering and may 
be started at the Hollister meeting if one is given this 
fall. Mr. Harris owns a farm in San Benito county, 
and spends considerable of his time there. He says 
there is considerable Interest in harness horse matteis 
among the people of that section and the Hollister 
meeting is sure to be well attended. He owns the well 
bred stallion Sidney Howard and has bred him to 
quite a number of good mares this year. 



The citizens of Eureka, Humboldt county, proDOso 
to hold a fair this year in spite of the fact that the 
directors of the local fair association had about con- 
cluded not to hold one. The Eureka fairs have 
always been largely attended and the enterprising 
business men of the city concluded they would not 
permit it to be side tracked -this year, so they called a 
meeting and decided upon a fair that should be second 
to none ever held in the county. Now that the fair 
directors have the assurance that the citizens want a 
fair they will proceed with all the energy they can 
muster to make it a big success. 




ADAM G. 2:14 1-4 

Samuel B. Whitehead, well known to every horseman 
on this coast, will leave San Francisco today on the 
steamer Korea for a trip around the world, expecting 
to be away from home about a year. Mr. Whitehead 
in the old days, when auction and mutual pools were 
the only systems used to handle the bettings at the 
fairs and race meetings on this coast, sold pools at all 
the principal meetings here, and was one of the best 
auctioneers ever seen on the block. He has not been 
in the best of health lately and takes this trip doubly 
for the purpose of regaining it and seeing the sights 
of the world. His many friends will wish him a joy- 
ful trip and a happy return. 

A stock farm owner advertised for a trainer. 
"Wanted," so ran the advertisement he put in a turf 
paper, "A first class trainer for stock farm. Must be 
sober and industrious, be able to shoe horses, mend 
harness, look after the broodmares and keep the 
farm's books. None but a competent race driver need 
apply. Best of references must accompany applica- 
tion. Wages, $40 per month and house rent.'* The 
advertisement brought but one applicant, and he 
wrote as follows: "I am certain I have the ability to 
fill every requirement demanded in your advertise- 
ment, and I would like the job. After thinking it 
over, however, I don't see any advantage in free house 
rent. If I did all the things the advertisement asks 
for I wouldn't have any time to live in the house." 

The hundreds of horsemen who know Secretary 
Murray Howe of Memphis, Tenn., will learn with 
sorrow that Richard Howe, his five-year-old son, met 
death in Chicago, June 29th. Mr. and Mrs. Howe and 
their three children arrived in Chicago from Mem- 
phis, Mrs. Howe reaching the home of friends on 
Lincoln avenue about noon. Richard, In running 
across the street, was confronted by two wagons go- 
ing in opposite directions. He hesitated until one 
wagen had passed and then rushed forward. Owing 
to the fact that the driver had no chance to seethe 
child and pull up his horse, the wagon passed over 
the child's body after hurling him violently to the 
ground. Death was instantaneous. Murray Howe 
accompanied the body to Memphis the following 
evening, the funeral services having been held in 
Chicago. The driver of the wagon, a colored man, 
was In no way to blame for the frightful accident, and 
the coronor's inquest so decided. Unlike the auto- 
mobllists who run over people and then sprint away, 
he went into the house on his own accord and re- 
mained there until the police arrived. — Horse World. 



The accompanying picture of the 
gelding Adam G. 2:1^1, now owned by 
J. W. and Willard Zibbell, was taken 
two years ago at Vallejo. At that 
time William McGraw of Silas Skin- 
ner fame, who has for years past been 
employed at the navy yard there, was 
using Adam G. as a road horse. Prof. 
E. P. Heald, President of the Pacific 
Coast Trotting Horse Breeders Asso- 
ciation, owned the horse at the time 
and was permitting Mr. McGraw to 
use him. The editor of the Breeder 
and Sportsman was in attendance 
at the Vallejo meeting, and while en- 
gaged in photographing some of the 
horses met Prof. Heald, who remarked 
that he bad a gelding there that was 
worth photographing, as some day he 
would be racing in fast time Prof. 
Heald did not have the horse regu- 
larly trained until he sent him to Wil- 
lard Zibbell (the unfortunate young 
trainer 60 frightfully injured at Fres- 
no last week), who soon saw he had a 
prize and with his father purchased 
the gelding from Professor Heald. 
As the horse is the talk of the tracks 
now, and is considered a sure 2:10 
trotter, the prediction made by his 
breeder two years ago when this picture was taken is 
of more than ordinary interest at this time. Prof. 
Heald informs us that he owns several other foals 
from Adam G.'s dam, Nona Y., and that he believes 
each and every one of them will take a standard rec- 
ord, as every colt she ha9 ever had has shown speed 
as soon as it is put to work. She is already the dam 
of four with records better than 2:19. Her dam, 
Black Flora was also a great producer, being the dam 
of four standard trotters, viz.: Huntress 2:28, Peri- 
helion 2:25, Nona Y. 2:25 and Sister 2:191, all full 
brothers and sisters, and the only standard trotters to 
the credit of Admiral. Sister was campaigned by the 
late John Goldsmith in 1886 and 1887 and won many 
races, being almost invincible. Black Flora was sired 
by Black Prince, a horse bred by the late Gen. John 
Bid well of Chioo, who imported his sire and dam from 
Kentucky, but who did not keep any record of their 
breeding. 

A three-year-old that gives every promise of being 
a 2:12 trotter before the season is over is the brown 
colt Ambush that took a two-year-old record of 2:20 
last season and reduced this to 2:17 at the Los Angeles 
meeting this year in a race against aged horses. 
Ambush is a son of Zolock out of a mare by Silknut 
son of Slikwood 2:07. Ho started three timeB last year. 
His first start was at San Jose in the two-year-old 
trotting division of the Breeders Futurity. There 
were eight starters in this event, and Ambush earned 
third money, being 2-5-5 in the final summary. Two 
weeks later he started in a purse for two-year-olds at 
Santa Rosa, and was again third, Athasham being 
the winner in straight heats in 2:20) and 2:20 At 
Sacramento the following week he started in the same 
field and after winning the first heat in 2:20, Bellemont 
beat him for first money in 2:204 and 2:25. At the Los 
Angeles meeting he was started on Saturday in the 
2:20 class trot, against such horses as Charlie T., 
Pat Rose that took a record of 2:12 1 the first day of 
the meeting, and several other aged trotters. Charlie 
T. won the first heat in 2:14£ with Ambush close to 
him, and captured the second in slower time as the 
colt made a break. In tho third heat Charlie T. 
finished in front on a break, but was set back and the 
heat given to Ambush whose time as second horse was 
2:17. The race was then postponed until the next 
day, when Charlie T. won with the mile in 2:15 and 
Ambush a close second again. It was a great race for 
a three-year old during the first week In July, and the 
son of Zolock is looked upon to get a very low record 
before the year ends. 



6 



[July 22, 19f5 



GREAT RACING AT FRESNO. 

Breeders Meeting Opened Wednesday With 
Large Attendance and Ideal Weather. 

Instead of the hot wave which many expected, 
there was ideal weather od Wednesday of thie week 
when the Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders 
Association opened its meeting at Fresno. The new 
palm grandstand seating 2000 people was comfortably 
filled and as evory race was well contested the crowd 
enjoyed the afternoon to the utmost. The new judges 
stand which is undoubtedly the finest and best 
appointed in the State was occupied by President E. 
P. Heald, and Directors J C. Kirkpatrick and T. J. 
Crowley as Judges, while Ed R. Smith of Los Angeles 
started the horses and got them off in good shape. 

The first race was the 2:27 trot, which was won in 
straight heats by John Treadwell's Zombro gelding 
Charlie T. ably driven by Al McDonald. While 
Charlie T. won very handily there was a contest in 
each mile, Ray Bennett's bay gelding Oro Belmont 
driving him out in the first and third heats and Lute 
Lindsay's Oregon horse Sam Bowers making a hot 
race with him through the stretch in the second heat. 
In the first heat Charlie was forced to lower his Los 
Angeles record of 2:14} to 2:134, but he did it in a 
manner that makes him look like a 2:10 horse before 
the season is ended. There was a horse race in every 
heat of this event. 

TheRiisin City Stake, $1500 for 2:20 pacers, had 
six starters and was won by Virginia, the Bob Mason 
mare owned by Ben Davies of San Bsrnardino. 
Virginia reduced her Los Angeles record half a sec- 
ond and her mirk is now 2:091. Nellie R. took the 
first heat in 2:11 and was second in the next two heats, 
when having second money won and not being able to 
beat Virginia she finished fourth. In the last heat 
John R. Conway was the contending horse and was 
only beaten a short head In 2:10$. This was a great 
contest. 

The road race for pacers driven by members of the 
Fresno Driving Club was one of the best races of the 
day, and went to the Hanford mare Lady R. by Col. 
K. R., driven by Pat Sweeney. She won in straight 
heats in 2:16} and 2:12^, very fast time for a road 
horse. The summaries: 
• Vlsalla stakes, 2:87 olass trotting, $800. 

Charlie T., blk g by Zombro-Sarah Benton. . .(McDonald) 1 1 i 



Oro Belmont, ch g by Oro Wilkes (Keamsj 2 3 2 

Sam Bowers, ch g by Joe Simpson (Lance) 3 2 3 

Wild Bell, br g by Wildnut (Freeman) 4 4 4 

Dew Drop, b m by Richard's Elector (Gates) 5 5 5 

Lady Jones, blk m by Capt. Jones (Green) dis 

Pat Rose, ch g by Falrose (Wright) dls 

Time by quarters- 



First heat :3S 1:06 1:40 2:1354 

Second heat.. :3354 1:07 1:42 2:1ft 
Third heat 3354 1:08 1:43 2:1654 

Raisin City Stake, 2:20 class pacing, $1500. 
Virginia, ch m ty Bob Mason-Coral by 

Grandee (Delaney) 2 111 

Nellie R . b m by Wayland W (Quinn) 12 2 4 

John R. Conway, ch s by Diablo (Chadbourne) 4 3 3 2 

Bessie Barnes, blk m by Zombro {Durfee) 5 5 4 3 

Little Joe, b g by Diablo (Freeman) 6 4 dis 

Fearnot, b s by Lynmont (Stewart) 3 dls 

Miss Winn, ch m by Demonio (Reams) dls 

Time by quarters- 
First ne*t... :33X 1:05 1:39 2:11 
Second heat.. :3254 1:05 1:3854 2:11 
Third heat ...:3154 1:04 1:38 2:0954 
Fourth heat.. :34 1:08 1:39 2:1054 

Pacing race, Fresno Driving Club, purse $200. 

Lady R.. b m by Col. K. R (P. Sweeney) 1 1 

Elmont, b g by Almont (E. R Reed) 4 2 

Selda. b m by Stormv John (Stockdale) 2 4 

Mabel C, blk m by Strathway (S.Walton) 3 3 

George, b g by Loeber (D. L. Baohant) ds 

Time by quarters- 
First heat. .. ,:34 1:09 1:44 2:165* 
Second heat.. :3354 l :»..'* 1:39 fclfjK 

SECOND DAY. 

Thursday was a Zolock day at the Fresno track, 
and the handsome pacing son of McKinney covered 
himself with glory as a race horse and added to his 
youthful but brilliant reputation as a sire of early and 
extreme speed. He won both heats of the free-for-all 
pace In 2:05}, the fastest time made in the United 
States this year, lowering his own record of 2:00 made 
at Los Angeles a few days ago, and lowering the 
Fresno track record nearly two seconds. For this last 
performance he earned for his driver Henry Delaney, 
a $50 bill generously offered by Mr. Fulton G. Berry 
for the horse that would break the track record of 
2:07. After Zolock had paced the first heat in 2:05} 
and won the $50, Mr. Berry offered another bill of the 
same value is the 2:05} was beaten, by any horse in the 
race. The time was the same. Director T. J. Crowley 
presented the $50 check to Mr. Delaney in a neat 
speech. Starter Ed Smith who is one of the closest 
observers, sends us the following account of Thurs- 
day's races: 

The great stallion from San Bernardino— Zolock— 
won the free-for-all pace in one of the hotteets contests 
ever witnessed in this State. The first heat was a 
horse race from wire. They were off on the third 
score with Zolock on the pole, Daedalion second, in 
which positions they paced to the half-mile pole in 
1:02, both lapped, with Edwin S. third by about four 



lengths. At the head of the stretch Zolock was first in 
1:35 with Edwin S. second by two lengths. Coming 
through the stretch Edwin S. was gaining a little at 
every stride and was boaten out but a 6hort head in 
thegreatest finish of the year in the fast timeof 2:05]. 

The second heat was won by Zolock in the same 
time 2:05}, being only about four lengths ahead of the 
other three, and every horse in the race paced better 
than 2:07, all fighting to better their positions. 

In the three-year-old race that grand young stallion 
Ambush won in three straight heats after having a 
horse race every heat with Mr. Warlow's youDg stal- 
lion Athasham, who was the contender in every mile, 
forcing Ambush to trot the first heat in 2:14}, the 
second in 2:16$ and the third in 2:19. The four colts 
in this race are all very high class and any one of 
them will beat 2:15 easily at the meetings later on. 
The attendance was great and much larger than on 
the first day. The track is in first class condition and 
every thing is moving smoothly and great things are 
in store for the Light Harness Horse Brigade during 
the rest of this meeting and also at Santa Rosa and 
the State Fair. The summaries: 



Geo. L. Warlow Stake, for three-year old trotters. $800. 

Ambush, br c by Zolock-dam by Sllkwood (Bonnell) 1 1 1 

Athasham, br c by Athadon (Walton) 2 2 2 

Kenneth C, blk o by McKinney (Trefry) 4 3 3 

Elma S., b t by Nutwood Wilkes (Chadbourne) 3 4 4 



Time by quarters- 
First Heat. . ..:34 1:0754 1:11 2:14!* 
Second heat... :34 1:075* 1:43 2:15* 
Third heat....:35 1:0954 1:45 2:19 

Pacing, free-for-all, two in three, $600. 



Zolock. br s by McKinney (Delaney) 1 1 

Edwin S., ch g by Dr. Hicks (Chadbourne) 2 3 

Kelly Brlggs, br s bv Bayswater Wilkes (Wright) 4 2 

Daedalion, brs by Diablo (Ward) 3 4 



Time by quarters- 
First heat ... .:31 1:02 196 2:055* 
Second heat.. :32 1:03 1:35 2:055* 

NOTES OF THE MEETING. 

W. G. Durfee worked Petigru a half over the 
Fresno track last Wednesday in 1:03} and sent him to 
the half in the next heat in l:02jj and to the three- 
quarter pole in 1 :34 and the next eighth in 15} seconds. 
This is better than a 2:06 gait. He looks good en jugh 
to take to Memphis, Durfee has been saving Belle- 
raont for the three-year-old trotting division at the 
Breeders $6000 Futurity at Santa Rosa and the 
Occident Stake at the State Fair. She worked four 
heats the day of Petigru's sensational halve;, doiDg 
the third and fourth heats in 2:1 8 and 2:17$ respectively, 
last quarters in 32 seconds — a 2:08 gait. There are a 
lot of good three-year-old trotters this year and the 
big coIj stakes will be won in fast time. 

The temporary grand stand erected for the Breeders 
meeting is all right. It is not particularly ornate 
architecturally, but commodious, cool and a credit to 
those who devised and built it. It was erected in lets 
than a week and will seat 2000 people. Big fan palm 
leaves were used largely for the roof and back afford- 
ing plenty of shade and a chance for the breeze. 

Fulton G. Berry sails the "Nixie" on the high seas 
and when he isn't winning races on the briney deep 
he is running things in Fresno, and he keeps them 
going with free sheet and all sails set. It was bis 
genius that invented the big bell made of electric 
lights with the pleasing legend, "Welcome Horse- 
men," that illuminates the principal corner in Fresno. 
It is about 20 feet high, 14 feet in diameter, of most 
graceful form and several hundred electic lights were 
used in its construction. In his home town he per- 
vades everything and is is largely due to his untiring 
efforts that the Breeders were enabled to go to Fresno. 
A. J. Hudson makes less fuss than Commodore Berry 
but he "gets there just the same." He knows what 
is wanted and goes ahead and does it. He is an en- 
thusiastic horseman and to him and Geo. L. Warlow 
is the credit due that the track and buildings were 
ready in time for the meeting. 



State Board of Agriculture. 

The directors of the State Agricultural Society, at 
a meeting held last week cauvassed the entries for the 
harness racing part of the program for the State Fair. 
The report of the Speed Committee, which was 
adopted as presented, provided sixteen harness races, 
and recommended the cancellation of three events 
wherein the required number of entries had not been 
received. A special resolution was carried, however, 
retaining as part of the program a free-for-all pace 
event for which a purse of $600 will be offered. It was 
decided that there should be three running races each 
day, with a minimum purse of $250, this bt ing an in- 
crease over the size of last year's purses. 

The annual election of officers was held. Benjamin 
F. Rush of Suisun was re-elected president; James 
WhiUker of Gait received the vice-presidency: 
Thomas Fox was selected for superintendent of the 
fair grounds, and William Land as superintendent of 
the new pavilion. The new committees will be an. 
nounced bj the president at the next meeting, to be 
held on July 29th. 

A general admission charge of 50 cents for adults 



and 25 cents for children between the ages of 12 and 
16 years will prevail at the next fair. Season tickets 
admitting all the members of one family will be sold 
for $5. A charge of $7 50 has usually been made for 
such tickets. 

It was decided that the stock parade should be held 
on Wednesday, and the premium parade on the fol- 
lowing day. The meeting was held late in the after- 
noon, an adjournment having been taken at 1:30 
o,clock out of respect to the memory of the late 
Charles M. Ccglan. 

An Opportunity to Get a Good One. 

When the horses owned by the late J. Malcolm 
Forbes of Boston were sold in New York in 1903, 
Robert A. Smith purchased a colt that is now five 
years old and very handsome, that is about as well 
bred as any horse ever brought to this Coast. He is 
by that great trotter, Peter the Great 2:07} (sire of 
Sadie Mac (3) 2:11$, etc.) by Pilot Medium, greatest 
son of Happy Medium. His dam is the producing 
mare Juanita 2:29 (dam of Sinaloa 2:25:1) by Sultan, 
the sire of Stamboul 2:07$; his grandam is the great 
mare Beulah, dam of six in the list, including Beuzetta 
2:06 J and Early Bird 2:10, and his great grandam is 
the mare Sally B. (dam of Maurine 2:13} and two more 
in the li3t) by the thoroughbred horse Lever, a son of 
the great Lexington. This colt is fit to head any 
stock farm, and he is fast at either gait. He was 
worked a few weeks as a three-year-old and trotted a 
mile in 2:21, with the last half in 1:07. He was tben 
sold and brought to California. This year Will Dur- 
fee worked him at the pace as he seemed rather in- 
clined to that gait, and after a very little training 
reeled off a mile in 2:1 1 J, with the last quarter in 30 
seconds. A mild attack of distemper threw him out 
of training, but he is sound and all right now, and can 
show an intending purchaser a mile in 2:12 or very 
close to it. His owner, Robert A. Smith of Los An- 
geles, has no use for him and would like to sell. He 
will consider a trade for a first-class trotter. See his 
advertisement in this issue. 



News From the North. 

[Rural Spirit, Portland ] 

Altacora 2:13 pacing, full sister to Chehalis 2:04}, 
will not be bred this year, but will be put in training 
as soon as her Joe Patchen filly is weaned, for a lower 
record next season. 

John Sawyer and Doc Ward have moved their 
stables of harness horses to the state fair grounds 
from Irvington track, to make room for the bang-tails 
that are coming over from Seattle. 

J. N. McKay, of Woodburn, has purchased the 
German Goach stallion, Pfiel, formerly owned by 
Duncan Scott, of Eugene. Pfiel has won prizes at the 
Oregon state fair the past two years in a class for 
German Coach stallions. 

T. N. Davidson, Jr., of Salem, has leased the Ha 
stallion Hal D. from Homer Davenport and taken him 
to Salem for the balance of the season. Hal D. is one 
of the speediest green pacers in the state, and most 
likely he will be trained and raced during bis stay In 
Oregon. 

E, B. Tongue has brought his pacers, Byron Lace 
2:14} and Lord Lovelace home from California end 
placed them in the hand of J. B. Stetson to campaign. 
Mr. Stetson moved to the state fair ground track this 
week where will begin getting together a stable for 
the fall meetings. Byron Lace attracted quite a lot of 
attention in California by his easy, smooth way of 
going and he is looked by many as a sure two ten-er. 

The Albany Driving Club presented an Interesting 
and successful program at its meeting, July 7tb. 
Track was fast, weather ideal and about a thousand 
people entered the gates or climbed over the fences. 
It is to be noted that Albany is showing an increased 
interest in the harness horse, and several campaigners, 
successful in their day, and still good for a brush or 
a matinee, have been added to the list of Linn county 
roadsters. 

The races were called promptly at two, with W. 
W. Percival, president of the Independence Driving 
Club, Worth Huston and G. A. Westgate in the 
judge's stand. Sheriff White was a most satisfactory 
marshal and W. H. Sloan of Salem with A. L. 
Munkers regulated the cbroncmetei s and banded out 
the official time. Purses offered amounted to a few 
hundred dollars. 

The program followed the advertised order as 
follows: 

Free for-all trot or pace, 

Ben Bolt, b g by Alexis 1 1 

MayTllden br m by Altamont 2 a 

Pathmark, b h by Pathmont 3 3 

Time— 2:21, 2:25. 

Road race, owners to drive, 

Dick K . blk h by Coeur d'Alene 4 1 1 

Teddy, br g by Holmdel 1 3 2 

Rosemond.b g by Rosemon 5 5 

Major, ch g by Multnomah 3 4 d 

Time— 2:44*, 2:4554, 8:47. 



July 22, 1905j 



The Horse's Pulse. 

The veterinary editor of the London Farm and 
Uovie g'.ves a valuable article that horsemen and 
stockmen should know about the pulsations of the 
horse, which is here reproduced: 

What is the number of pulsations of the horse? 
suggests the holding of the popular notion that accele- 
rat ! on is taken into serious consideration when the 
indications of the pulse are considered as an aid to 
diagnosis in disease. The knowledge that in the horsei 
or, for the matter of that, any other domesticated 
animal, the pulsations in health average so many per 
minute isnot likely to be very useful to the farmer or 
horse-owner — indeed it may lead the aaateur veterin* 
ary surgeon astray, unless at the fame time he appre- 
ciates the importance of character in the pulse. He 
may see the doctor lightly grasping the wrist of his 
patien', with tbe finger of one hand, while holding his 
watch in his other, in his best bedside manner; or the 
veterinary surgeon standing on the near side of hie 
patient with his left hand on ihe horse s nose, and 
pressing the sub-maxillary artery against the lower 
jawbone with the fingers of his right— looking very 
serious and very wise — and assume that they are 
counting all the time; but they are not. Each takes 
some note of number, but, at the same time, the 
manner in which the blood is propelled through the 
artery is receiving the more serious consideration. 

There are several things that influence the number 
of pulsations, even in the healthy animal, including 
breed, age, pregnancy, warmth, plethora, etc , and 
thus there is a good deal of room for discrimination! 
even if there were anything in the popular notion 
that acceleration in speed is inseparably connected 
with disease. For example, if we take two horses, 
say a very common-bred carting animal and a well- 
bred hunter, it will be found that so far as the number 
of pulsations per minute is concerned, there may be a 
difference of eight or ten beats. At the same time the 
animal with the faster pulse may be in better health 
than the other. The same difference is to be observed 
in bovines as regards age, and between an early cow 
and a yearling heifer there may be a difference of 
ten to twenty pulsations — in fact, the pulse, as well as 
the respiration, is always faster in all young animals, 
while the internal temperature, as indicated by the 
clinical thermometer, is always higher. Nervous 
animals roughly handled show increased frequency, 
the excitement producing such an impression on the 
nervous system as to cause the action of the heart to 
be greatly quickened. The number of pulsations at 
any point of an artery simply represent the number 
of contractions of" the left ventricle of the heart in a 
given time, and if mere number is all we wantto know 
we need not trouble about taking the pulse at an 
artery at all. If the ear, or even the palm of the 
hand is placed against the chest on the near side, the 
number of heart beats can be correctly counted, and 
it will tell just as much as if pulsations are counted at 
a distant artery. 

It is, of course, deurahle to know that the pulse of 
the horse is normally 32 to 36, or 34 to 40 in well bred 
animals, that in the ox the average is K that it is 
faster during rumination ("0 to 80) and faster in the 
young animal (55 to 65) than in the adult; that in the 
sheep it is from 60 to 90; in the pig 55 to 75 and in the 
dog 70 to 90; but when this has been learned we are 
only on the threshold of the subject, for it is on 
char, cter that reliance has to be placed for the indica- 
tions of disease. The different kinds of pulsations, or 
character of pulse, have received different names to 
distinguish them, and in technical pathological de- 
scriptions we meet with such terms as full, small, soft, 
hard, oppressed, unequal, confused, thready, Im- 
perceptible, intermittent, diacrotonous, cordy, wiry 
and several others, as applied to the state of the pulse. 
It is hardly to be expected that the amateur will be 
able to understand all tbe finer distinctions, but an 
appreciation of at least the more important of the 
characteristics Is not difficult to acquire — indeed, is 
absolutely necessary to the proper understanding of 
tbe value of pulse indications in their relationship to 
departures from health. A slow pulse is when the 
number of beats is below the normal per minute, and 
it indicates defective nervous energy, such as would 
arise in certain brain troubles. A weak pulse denotes 
feeble heart action, and is expressive of debility. An 
irregular or intermittent pulse Indicates heart disease, 
and is due to arrest of the heart's action at either 
regular or Irregular intervals. A hard pulso Is in- 
dicative of inflammation or fever, the bard, jerky 
pulse of inflammation of the bowels Is an example. It 
is necessary also to be able to distinguish between 
frequency and quickness, since they are not by any 
means the same thing. A pulse may be described, 
say, as frequent, small and quick. This means a 
frequent beat of tbe heart, a quick contraction, and 
a small quantity of blood sent out at each beat. When 
the blood vessels are much distended we have the 



oppressed pulse, in which the beat is prolonged and 
not very marked. This indicates congestion, say, of 
the lungs, and, owing to obstruction, the blood is with 
difficulty forced along. 

Where to take the pulse is another common ques- 
tion, and one on which "Northern" requests informa- 
tion. From what has already been said, it will be 
understood that for indications other than that of 
number, which can be obtained by listening to the 
heart, it is necessary to take the pulse at an artery, 
tbe size and degree cf contraction of which shows the 
hardness, softness, fulness, smallness, etc. With 
every beat of the heart the blood is propelled through 
the vessels called arteries, which have a degree of 
elasticity that enables them to adapt themselves to 
the volume of the stream. The force with which the 
blood is propollod from the heart diminishes as the 
distance from the center of circulation Is increased, 
but is palpable to the remotest extremity. Owing to 
this diminution of the force it is desirable to select a 
vessel of considerable size, and as near to the heart as 
possible. It must be superficial, and so situated that 
it can be pressed against seme hard body, such as a 
bone. There are several arteries that permit of this 
beirg done, and different vessels are utilized for tak- 
ing ihe pulse in different animals by different prac- 
titioners. In the horse the sub maxillary artery is in- 
variably employed. The vessel is situated at the 
lower jaw, and the method usually adopted is to take 
up a position quietly on the near side of the animal, 
and to soothe and pat it to allay any fear or excite- 
ment. Then place the left hand lightly on the nose, 
and find the artery with the fingers of the right, 
pressing the vessel gently against the jaw bone, so as 
to ascertain the manner in which the blood is flowing 
through it. The number of pulsations per minute are 
counted while their character is noted. There is no 
point at which the e quine pulse can be taken so con- 
veniently as at the jaw, although there are, of course, 
other vessels which can be employed. It is safest, as 
well as most convenient. 



The Three-Quarter Shoe for Interfering Horses. 

It matters not how perfect some horses may be, or 
how well they are shod, the very best of them will be 
found to interfere, writes a shoer in the Ilorseshoer's 
Journal. Of the causes we know much and yet when 
a case of interfering is brought to us we often become 
puzzled as to what the cause really is. Perhaps it is 
a renewed case, one that the same man has shod 
before many times an4 has effected a cure of the 
interfering, and going about the job full of confidence 
he uses the same shoe and dresses the foot in thesame 
manner as he did before successfully, and yet the ani- 
mal may return worse off than ever, and this is what 
sets the horseshoer thinking. 

There are all kinds of shoes for the different kinds 
of interferers, and vo all know that the same rule can 
not be applied in any two cases, so we must revert to 
some particular design of shoe, acd some particular 
method of preparing the foot of a certain horse which 
is suitable to his particular case. It does not pay for 
a man in business to advise his patron to do something 
which will give him no return; a medical doctor or a 
lawyer are paid mostly for their advice; borseshoers 
should also be allowed something for theirs, and in- 
deed if tbey set themselves up as entitled to it they 
would receive pay for the advice they give, because it 
must be understood that our patient, tbe horse, is out 
of our sight the better portion of the month and still 
we are held more or less responsible for his well being 
in travel. But, as I was going to say, to advise the 
removal of the hind shoes when a horso is found in- 
terfering in that part and to have him driven for two 
or three days, then brought back and shod with light 
shoes, the face of which should bo rounded to com- 
pare with tho wear of the hoof while the feet have 
been jtripped, this is one of the surest and best 
methods to effect a cure of interfering that is possible 
to find . 

I before said thatit would not pay tho horseshoerto 
recommond this to the horse owner, but It does pay 
far better to hold tho patron's confidence than to dis- 
courage him by compelling the return of the horse 
two or tbr<?e times during perhaps one week and still 
no cure. Now this method of producing a cure can 
be tried in a case of any horse used for light driving, 
especially if he is used on the roads or where the pave- 
ments are very level, or on tbe dry roads. Next to 
this method of producing a quick cure I want to 
recommend the three-quarter shoe; tho three-quarter 
shoe Is to be commended for more than one reason, 
but it cannot, unfortunately, be used on all cases for 
the reason that the leg structures are different and 
therefore It cannot be used In all cases. Take for, 
instance, tbe foot which sets on a leg so as to bring Its 
center far to the outside of tho bones above; a three- 
eiuarter shoe on this kind of case would likely do 
more barm than good, but when tbe foot and leg are 



on a true line one with the other then the three- 
quarter shoe should be applied whenever possible 
because it possesses more real virtue if rightly ad justed 
than any interfering shoe ever designed. 

In preparing the foot for the three-quarter shoe, 
care should bo taken to reduce all of that portion of 
the wall on which the shoe sets; the Inside web of 
shoe should at Its extreme end set Into the hoof about 
half the thickness of the shoe and thus we get almost 
a perfectly level foot. The frog has its full play on 
the ground and the foot is brought as near to nature 
as any horseshoe can provide. There is a combination 
of virtues in the three-quarter shoe not tbe least of 
which is the additional weight given to the outside 
quarter, which assists in carrying the foot on a more 
straight lino with the body and away from the opposite 
ankle. Again, in picking the foot up there is no metal 
to cut or bruise the opposite ankle as in th6 case of 
the full snoe. The three-quarter shoe allows more 
complete play on tbe inside quarter of hoof, and here 
again we have an advantage because the expanding 
process is aonsequently going on all to the relief of 
tho foot. Tho animal that is built with feet pointing 
from his hips to the center of the body as they rest on 
the ground is most generally to be found interfering 
at some time in his life and on such a case the three- 
quarter shoe can be used with almost certain success. 

Improvements at Lexington. 

Box seats will be built in the grandstand at the 
Kentucky Trotting Horse Breeders' Association this 
summer. There will be about two hundred of them— 
one hundred seats in the grandstand proper and one 
hundred in the balcony. They will be completed 
before the great fall trots begin. 

The trots have become one of tho great social func- 
tions of tho fall season, Lovers of the light harness 
horses come hero from the evergreen shores of the 
Pacific, the busy cities of the Atlantic coast, the 
hustling towns of the North, and the sunny South. 
They meet here in the fall and attend tho greatest 
meeting for harness horses given in the world. 

It has been the object of the Kentucky Trotting 
Breeders' Association since the sport became popular 
hereto give the visitors and the home people the 
best accommodations that money could supply. The 
directors of the association have personally investi- 
gated the conditions of the hotels, and urged the 
proprietors to make the rooms and quarters com- 
fortable for the guests of the city at that time. Last 
year the management of the Phu-nix Hotel added an 
an extra story to tbe building in order to give the 
guests better accommodations. 

There was but one thing left to be done, and that 
was to give tho guests more privacy after tho grounds 
had been reached. The only solution to this problem 
was tbe construction of box seats, and the Board of 
Directors decided to have them put in. 

Secretary Horace Wilson has been receiving bids 
for the work for a week, and the contract will be 
closed In a short time. The seats will be sold to the 
highest bidders, and any person allowed in the grounds 
will be permitted to uso them if the price is paid. 

A new fence is replacing tho old one around the 
track. Other improvements are contemplated, so 
that by the time of the fall trots the grounds and 
buildings will be in excellent condition. — Kentucky 
Farmer and Breeder. 

What J. Crouch & Son Say. 

Messrs. J. Crouch & Son of the Lafayette Stock Farm, the 
largest Importers of German Coach, Iiolgtan and Perchcron stal- 
lions In the world, have tbljtosay: "We have used your Craft's 
Distemper & Cough Cure almost continuously for tbe past twelve 
years, and consider it Indispensable in tbe treatment of tbe vari- 
ous forms of distemper, coughs, colds, catarrhal and shipping 
fevers It is the only remedy that can he relied upon at all times 
and under all circumstances. No horseman should ever bo with- 
out the protection afforded by this great remedy. When shipping 
horses wo invariably use Craft's as a preventive against shipping 
fever and other Infectious diseases to which our horses are more 
or less exposed We reco mend it to all owners or handler! of 
horses." 

See This. 

Choico cattle and alfalfa ranch, 480 acres-, 150 pro- 
ducing alfalfa; fine herd Jersey cows; dairy outfit; 
150 hogs; two large electric pumping plants; nino 
million gallons water daily. Main line Santa Fe, 
close to Bakeirsheld. Easy terrap. Will consider ex- 
change. Address J. C. Arnold, Berkeley, Cal. * 



The New York Driving Club h»s been holding some 
good matinees lately. The new rulo pertaining to 
the classification of horses is a decided improvement; 
last year a horso winning a race was required to move 
up into a faster clasp, regardless as to whether he won 
by a length after a hard fought battlo or by ton 
lengths after an easy race This year the question of 
moving a winner up has been left to tho discretion 
of the classification committee, and better and closer 
races will bo the result. 

Strike!— If they don't givo youJackson's Napa Soda 
wber you ask for it. 



8 



[Jtjly 22, 1906 



ROD, GUN AND KENNEL. 



Conducted by J. X. De WITT 



Coming Events. 

Bod. 

April I -sept. 10. Oct. 16-Feb. 1— Open season tor taking steel- 
lead In tidewater. 
April 1-Sept. 15— Closed season for lobsters and crawfish. 
April 1-Nov. 1— Trout season open. 
June l-Jan. I— Open season for black bass. 

July S— Saturday Fly-Casttng Contest No. 8. Stow lake. 2:39 
p. m. 

July 9— Sunday Fly Casting Contest No. 8. Stow lake, 10 a. m. 
Sept. I0-Oct. 16 -Close season In tidewater for steelbead. 
Sept. I0-Oct. 16— Close season for catching salmon. 
Oct. 16-Nov. 15— Close season for taking salmon above tide, 
water. 

Nov. 1-Sept. 1— Open season for crabs. 

Nov. 15-Sept. 10— Season open for taking salmon above tide 
water. 

Gun. 

Feb. 15-Sept. 1— Closed season for mountain quail, grouse and 
iage hen. 

Feb. 15-Oct. 15— Closed season for quail, ducks, etc. 

April l-Oct. 15— Close season for English snipe. 

June 27, 30— The Interstate Association's Grand American Han 
dicap Target tournament, Indianapolis, Ind.; $1000 added money- 
Elmer E. Shaner, Secretary-Manager, Pittsburg, Pa. 

July l-Feb. 15— Dove season open. 

July 23— Fish and Game Gun Club Blue rocks. San Jose. 
July 3ii— Millwood Gun Club. Blue rocks. Mill Valley 
Junction. 
Aug l-Oct. 15— Deer season open. 

Aug 6— Golden Gate Gun Club. Blue rocks. Ingleside. 
Aug. 6— Blue Rock Gun Club. High-street grounds, Alameda. 
Aug. 6, 20— Mount View Gun Club. Blue rocks. Mount View' 
Cal. 

Aug. 13— California Wing Club. Live pigeons. Ingleside. 
Aug. 20— Union Gun Club. Blue rocks. Ingleside. 
Aug. 29 30— Interstate Association tournament. Blue rocks. 
Denver. Col. 

Sept. 9, 10— Empire Gun Club. Merchandise shoot. Blue rocks 
Alameda Junction. 

Sept. 12, 13, 14— Interstate shoot. Blue rocks. Ingleside. Elmer 
E. Shaner, Manager. Pacific Coast Handicap under auspices of 
S. F. Trapshooting Ass'n., A. M. Shields, Secretary 

Sept. 30-Oct. 1— Two-day blue rock tournament. Biggs, Butte 
county. H. Haselbusch, manager 

Sept. 30-Oct. 1— Biggs Gun Club. Two-day blue rock tournament. 
Biggs, Cal. 

Bench Shows. 

Aug. 15, 18— Orange County Agricultural Society. Middletown, 
N. V. D. A. Morrison, Secretary. 

Aug. 23. 25— Rockland County Industrial Association, bench 
show in New York City. A. A. Vanderbilt, Secretary. 

Aug. 31-Sept. 2 -Newport Dog Show. Newport, R. I. Francis M. 
Ware, Secretary 

Sept. Stockton Kennel Club. F. A. Gelsea, Secretary, Stock- 
ton, Cal. 

Sept. 16— Englewood Kennel Club. Englewood, N. J. M. W 
Robinson, Secretary. 

Sept. 27, 28— Valley Fair Kennel Club. Brattleboro, Vt. 
Howard C. Rice, Secretary. 

Oct. 3, 6— Danbury Agricultural Society, Danbury, Conn. Q. 
M. Rundle, Secretary. Jas. Mortimer, Superintendent. 

Nov. 15, 18— Boston Terrier Club Specialty Club. Boston. F. 
H. Osgood, Secretary. 

Nov. 28-Djc. 1— Philadelphia Dog Show Association. Phila- 
delphia. J. Sergeant Price, Secretary. 

1906. 

Feb. 12, 15— Westminster Kennel Club. New York. Robt. V. 
MoKlm, Secretary. 

Feb. 20, 23— New England Kennel Club Boston. Wm. B. 
Emery, Secretary. 

March 7, 10— Duquesne Kennel Club. Pittsburg, Pa. F. S. 
Steadman, Secretary. 

Field Trials 

Aug. 15— Iowa Field Trial Club. Geo. C. Cooper, Secretary, P. 
O. Box 55, Des Moines, la. 

Aug. 23— North Dakota Field Trial Club. Inaugural trials 
Grand Forks, N. D A E. Palmer, Secretary, Grand Forks, N. D. 

Sept 4— Nebraska Field Trial Association. 4th annual trials. 
O'Neill, Neb. H. H. McCarthy, Secretary, O'Neill, Neb. 

Sept. 6— Manitoba Field Trial Club, 19tb annual trials. La 
Salle, Man. Eric Hamber, Secretary, Winnepeg Man. 

Sept. 21-British Columbia Field Trial Club, 3d annual trials. 
Lailner, B C. H. S Rolston, Secretary, Vancouver. B. C. 

Oct. 12— Paolflc Northwest Field Trial Club. La Conner Flats, 
Wash. Chas. L. Lundy, Secretary, Seattle, Wash. 

Oot. 23— Ohio Field Trial Association. Washington Court House, 
O. C. T. Phillips, Secretary, Columbus, O. 

Oct. 30-American Field Futurity Stake. For Pointers and 
Setters whelped on or after January 1, 1904, whose dams have 
been duly qualified. Robinson, 111., entries closed July 1. Address 
Am. Field Publishing Co., Chicago 

Oot. 31— Connecticut Field Trial Club. Hampton, Conn, F. M. 
Chapin, Secretary. Pine Meadow, Conn. 

Nov. 6— Independent Field Trial Association. Hutsonville. 111. 
S. H. Socwell, Secretary, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Nov. 13— Illinois Field Trial Association. Robinson, 111. Wm. 
R. Green, Secretary, Marshall, 111. 

Nov Indiana Field Trial Club, (Week following Illinois 

Champion Stake). C. F. Young, Secretary, Clay City, Ind. 

Nov. 21— International Field Trial Club. Ruthven, Ont. W. B. 
Wells, Honorary Seoretary, Chatham, Ont. 

Dec. 2— Continental Field Trial Club, nth annual trials, . 

John White, Secretary, Hempstead. Long Island. 

Dec. Pointer Club of America (following the Continental 

trials). Barber, N. C. C. F. Lewis, Secretary, 126 Maiden Lane, 
New York. 

Deo. 12— Eastern Field Trial Club Waynesboro, Ga. S. C. 
Bradley, Secretary, Fairfield, Conn. 

1006. 

Jan Pacific Coast Field Trials Club, 23d annual trials. 

Bakersfleld, Cal. Albert Betz. Secretary, 201 Parrott Bldg., San 
Francisco. 




FIELD DOGS NOW IN DEMAND. 

Now that the fall hunting season is Dear at band 
many sportsmen are looking around for a desirable 
dog to work to the gun. In this respect we know of 
nothing better on the Coast than a broken Pointer 
from the Stockdale Kennels at Bakersfleld. Manager 
"Mace" Dodge is one of the best known and reputable 
trainers in the United States and a young dog turned 
out by him is a dog that a sportsman can rely on to 
be a valuable working field dog and thoroughly 
broken in every requisite. 



Open and Close Season. 

A practical and neat synopsis of the State game and 
fish laws, and also showing numerous changes in the 
State law — shortening the opem season, by vaiious 
county boards of supervisors, has been issued by 
Clabrough, Golcher & Company, 538 Market St., San 
Francisco. 

In view of the near approach of the deer season and 
the fall shooting we take occasion to give tbeinforma- 
tion in full, the county changes being of much interest 
to many sportsmen at this time, particularly so in 
respect to the open season on doves. 
State Law, open season — 
Deer, from Aug. 1st to Oct. 15th. 
Doves, from July 1st to Feb. 15th. 
Mountain quail, grouse, sage hen, Sept. 1st to 
Feb 15th. 

Valley quail, ducks, ibis, curlew, plover, rail, Oct. 
15th to Feb. 15th. 
Snipe, from Oct. 15th to March 31st. 
Trout, from April 1st 10 Oct. 31st. 
Steelhead trout, Oct. 16th to Jan. 31st. April 1st to 
Sept. 10th. Above tide waterclosed Nov. 1st to April 
1st. i 

Salmon, Oct. 16th to Sept. 10th. Above tide-water 
close Beason extends to Nov. 15th. 

Lobster or crawfish (not less that !H inches long) 
Sept. 15th to March 31st. 
Black bass, June 1st to Dec. 31st. 
Crab (not less than 6 inches across the back) Nov. 
1st to Aug. 31st 

Bag Limit — Quail, doves, grou9e, snipe, curlew, ibis, 
plover, rail, 25 in one day. Ducks, 50 in one day 
Deer, male, 2 in one season Trout, 25 lbs. weight or 
50 fish in one day. 
Open Season, county changes — 
Contra Costa — Deer, Aug. 15th to Aug. 20th. 
El Dorado— Deer, Sept 1st to Oct. 15th. 
Fresno — Doves, Aug. 15th to Feb. 1st; valley quail, 
Nov. 1st to Feb. 1st. 
Glenn — Doves, Aug. 1st to Feb. 15th. 
Los Angeles — Trout, May 1st to Aug. 1st; doves, 
Aug. 15th, one day only; deer, Aug. loth to Oct. 1st; 
valley quail, Oct. 15th to Feb. 1st; mountain quail, 
Sept. 1st to Oct. 15tb. 

Madera — Deer, Sspt. 1st to Oct 15; valley quail, 
Nov. 1st to Feb. 1st; trout, six inches long, doves, 
Aug. Is. to Feb. 1st. 

Merced — Doves, Aug. 15th to Feb 15th. 
Mono — Trout, July 1st to Nov. 1st. 
Marin — Deer, Aug. 1st to Sept. 15th. 
Placer — Doves, Aug. 15th to Feb. 15th; trout in 
Lake Tahoe and streams tributary thereto, June 1st 
to Nov. 1st. 

Riverside — Deer season closed; trout, May 1st to 
July 1st. 

Sacramento — Doves, July 15th to Feb 15th. 
San Luis Obispo— Deer, Aug. 1st to Sept. 15th. 
Santa Barbara — Deer, Aug. 1st to Aug. 31st. 
Santa Clara — Doves, Aug. 1st to Feb. 15th. 
Santa Cruz— Rabbits, Oct. 15th to Feb. 15th; doves, 
prohibited; unlawful to trail deer with dogs at any 
time. 

San Bernardino — Deer, Aug. 15th to Oct. 1st; dovee, 
Aug. 15th, one day only; mountain quail, Sept. 1st to 
Oct. 15th: valley quail, Oct. 15th to Feb. 1st; trout, 
May 15th to Nov. 1st. 
San Benito — Deer, Aug. 1st to Oct. 1st. 
San Mateo — Cottontail or brush rabbits, July 1st to 
Feb. 1st; rail, Oct. 15th to Nov. 16th; deer, Aug. 1st to 
Oct. 1st. 

Sutter — Doves, Aug. 1st to Feb. 15th. 
San Joaquin — Doves, Aug. 1st to Feb. 15th. 
Stanislus — Doves, Aug. 1st to Feb. 15th. 
Ventura — Deer, Aug. 1st to Sept. 1st; doves, Sept. 
1st to Oct. 1st. 
Yuba— Doves, Aug. 1st to Feb. 15th. 

The State game and fish laws prevail unchanged in 
the following counties: 

Amador, Alpine, Alameda, Colusa, Calaveras, Del 
Norte, Humboldt, Inyo, Kern, King, Lassen, Lake, 
Mendocino, Monterey. Modoc, Napa, Nevada, Plumas, 
Sonoma, Shasta, Siskiyou, Sierra, San Diego, Solano, 
Trinity, Tulare, Tehama, Tuolumne. 

Advices have not yet been received from Butte, 
Mariposa, Orange or Yolo counties. 

San Francisco, no changes have been made, an old 
county ordinance, however, makes it a misdemeanor 
to hunt game within the county limits. 

What is always unlawful — To buy, sell, offer for 
sale, barter or trade, at any time, apy quail, dove, 
pheasant, grouse, sage ben, snipe, ibis, plover, rail, or 
any deer meat or deer skins. 
To have in possession doe or fawn skins. 
To take or kill, at any time, does, fawns, elk, ante- 
lope, mountain sheep, or tree squirrels. 
To take or kill pheasants, or any Imported quail. 
To run deer with dogs during the close season. 
To shoot half hour before sunrise or half hour after 
sunset. 

To trap protected game or birds of any kind with- 
out having first procured written authority from the 
Board of Fish Commissioners. 

To take, possess, or destroy nests or eggs of any 
birds. 

To ship game or fish in concealed packages, or with- 
out your name and address. 
To buy or sell trout less than one pound in weight. 
To t ike, at any time, sturgeon or female crabs. 



To take red or green abalones less than 15 inches in 
circumference. 

To take black abalones less than 12 inches in cir- 
cumference. 

To take trout, black bas9, or steelhead, except with 
hook and line. 

To take salmon, shad, or striped bass with a net less 
than 7J-inch mesh, or to use a set net. 

To fish with boat and net without a license. 

To fish for salmon, shad, or stripped bass with 
nets Saturday and Sunday. 

To take fish, in any manner, within 50 feet of a 
fish way. 

To take, buy or sell stripped bass less than three 
pounds in weight. 

To take or kill meadow larks, or any other wild 
birds, except bluejays, English sparrows, sharp- 
shinned hawk, Cooper's hawk, duck hawk, great 
horned owl, or California linnet. 

To shoot on enclosed land without permission. 

To export dried shrimp or shrimp shells. 

Killing an elk, a felony— 1 to two years imprison- 
ment. 

Fine for violation game laws, $25 to $500 and im- 
prisonment. 

Fine for violation of fish laws, $20 to $500 and Im- 
prisonment. 

Smallest fine for using explosives to take any fiih, 
$250 and imprisonment. 

Smallest fine for killing does, fawns, antelopes or 
mountain sheep, $50. 



DOING S IN DO GDOM. 

SANTA CRUZ KENNEL CLTTB. 

A practical outcome of the recent show at Santa Cruz 
has resulted in the organization of an enthusiastic 
kennel club. The new club starts off with a splendid 
list of membership, including some of the most promi- 
nent citizens of the county. It Is proposed to hold a 
bench show in the Casino some time in September. 

The membership roll and officers of the new club 
are the following: 

President, Joseph O. Home; first vice-president, 
Montroyd Sharpe; second vice-president, Warren 
R. Porter; secretary, F J. Torchiana; treasurer, H. 

D. Fagen; directors, Joseph O. Home, Montroyd 
Sharpe, T. W. Kelly, H. S. Wanzer, Fred W. Swan- 
ton; bench show committee, Joseph O. Home, J. M. 
Walsh, J. J. C. Leonard, T. W. Kelly, F. J. Tor- 
chiana; members, J. O. Home, G H. Normand, Mont- 
royd Sharpe, James Normand, Major F. McLaughlin, 
H. Willey, Warren R. Porter, Leo A. Dieter, P. J. 
Torchiana, J. M. Walsh, James G. Piratsky, J. J. C. 
Leonard, H F. Anderson, H. D. Fagen, Fred R. 
Howe, W. C. Hoffman, Thomas K. Kelly, George 
Martin, Fred W. Swanton. Percy Morse, J. W. 
Forgeus, D. W. Johnston, Irving Townsend, G. W. 
Sill, Geo. C. Stafller, J. W. Baxter, F. O. Hihn, Fred 
R. Walti, H. S. Fletcher, W. E. Miller, Jr., H. S. 
Wanzer, N. J. Stewart, E. Kelly, J. G. Tanner, C. 
F. Fagen. 

A 8EATTLE DOG POISONING CASE 

The prosecution, that it is claimed would have re- 
sulted in a conviction, of a dog poisoner one Adam 
Hoenicke, was dropped by the Seattle Kennel Club 
for the reason that the defendant, a well to do farmer, 
was found dead in a field the night previous to his 
preliminary hearing on a charge of maliciously poison- 
ing dogs with strychnine. 

Hoenicke had been dead apparently a week or more 
when the body was discovered. He bad not been seen 
since June 23d, and it was evident to callers, from ap- 
pearances about his place, that be had been absent, 
a search of several days resulted in finding the re- 
mains. He was 73 years old, his death is supposed to 
have been due to heart ailments. 

The crime for which the aged farmer was arrested 
by Humane Officer Clark, of Seattle, at the request of 
the Seattle Kennel Club, was the death by poisoning 
of three valuable dogs. J. W. Riplinger's English 
Setter Bracken O'Leck had a close call also. Capt. 

E. A. Swift's Pointer bitch, Kitsap Juno, winner at 
the recent Seattle show, and an English Setter owned 
by John W. Considine were two of the victims. 
Autopsies showed strychnine to have been the cause 
of death. 

A number of witnesses were ready to prove that 
Hoenicke had opedy expressed threats to kill all of 
the dogs in the kennels of S. Hanson at South Park, 
about five miles from Seattle. Hanson is a well known 
and popular trainer and had in charge a number of 
dogs for the coming Northwest field trials. 

Dogs in Washington State are personal property 
and owners are protected by statute. Charles L. 
Lundy, a Seattle fancier, had been retained for the 
prosecution and would have, subsequent to the crimi- 
nal trial, brought civil action for damages. 

WORKING COLLIES. 

Glen Tana Collie Kennels make a specialty of breed- 
ing the best working strains of Collies for sheepmen 
and sell them at reasonable prices. The G. T. Collies 
have made a clean sweep of the Pacific Coast shows, 
winning 168 first prizes, 18 seconds, 3 thirds and 
special cups for best Collie bitch and best Collie dog 
in 7 shows. The Spokane kennels also have the 
largest and best kennel of stud dogs on the Coast. A 
select lot of puppies are offered fanciers who are 
desirous of getting good stock. Orders for young or 
old dogs ean be filled and purchasers can rely on the 
integrity of the kennel management. 

It behooves the fancy to send for the recently Issued 
circular listing a number of desirable dcgs that are 
for sale. A request mailed to Thos. S. Griffith, P. O. 
Box No. 1907, Spokane, Wash., will receive prompt 
attention. In the list of dogs and bitches offered ai 
stud and for sale will be found much information of 
value to Collie breeders. 



We note in the classified "ads" on page 15, that Mr. 
D. E. Martin of Llvermore has some desirable young 
Pointers for sale. 



July 22, 1905J 



l&lie greets* ants gtpurteman 



PUPPIES WITH OSTRICH APPETITES. 

Joseph Graham, the well kDOwn authority on ken- 
nel matters, was recently asked for advice as to treat- 
ing a young dog which has a habit of eating hard and 
indigestible substances. In reply he said: "The best 
advice is — get another dog. Ouce I thought this habit 
came from lack of bones or bone material in tbe food. 
My present notion is that it is a symptom of serious 
nervous disorder, and has no relation to the elements 
of food. Every young dog that has manifested this 
craving under my observation has had aderangement 
of the nervous system. One beautiful son of Cincin- 
natus' Pride in my kennel would make a meal on soft 
coal. He would chew bits of brick, pieces of wood — 
almost anything hard that was chewable at all I put 
bone dust in his food and broke up soup bones. But 
it was soon apparent that he was suffering from a 
deep-seated nervous derangement. Any excitement 
or rapid exercise, after he was a year old, produced a 
convulsion. He died in a fit. What sort of nervous 
disorder is the cause of this particular habit I cannot 
say. Nerve symptoi s are queer things, even for the 
specialists. A man may have terrific pains in his arm 
when the trouble lies somewhere in the base of his 
brain. He may have an irritable stomach from fatigue 
of the eyes. Ahorse may take to cribbing, because 
there is an itch in a nerve centre or an instinct arti- 
ficially repressed. In a human being we try patiently 
to cure these nerve troubles. " 

With a doer, the case is just so much more baffling, 
we btlieve Mr. Graham gives the properdiagnosis and 
remedy. 

AMERICAN FIELD FUrUltlTY. 

The Coast is represented in the first American Field 
Futurity by three entries. 

J. W. Flynn (San Francisco) nominates Senator and 
Senator's Don, two lemon and white Pointer dogs by 
Ch. Senator P. out of Flynn's Dolly Jina*o, whelped 
May 13, 1904. 

J. E. Lucas (San Rafael) nominates Uncle Dudley, 
black, white and tan English Setter dog by Count 
Whitestone out of Sport's May Belle, whelped May 
17, 1904, bred by Peebles and White, Seattle, Wash. 

Both Senator's Don and Uncle Dudley are also 
entered in the Pacific Coast Derby. 

British Columbia is represented by W. T. Hunter's 
(Greenwood) blue belton English Setter dog Tona- 
paugh by Tony Boy-Sport's Estelle, whelped April 
20, 1904. 

The entries in the American Field Futurity number 
fifty-eight. 

ISLAND BENCH SHOW 

There ia strong probability of a bench show coming 
off at Honolulu in the near future. The proposed 
show will be held in conjunction with the annual 
poultry show. If the affair can be arranged, we are 
informed a large string of dogs will- be sent there 
from this city and other points. 

Among the recent happenings in local Collie circles 
we are informed of a whelping of 13 puppies (8 dogs) 
by J. Martin's Ormskirk Duchess to Presidio Con- 
queror on July 18th. 

Presidio Lassie, a bitch owned by Hugh McCracken 
was served July 17th by Dr. W. P. Burnham's Bran- 
dane Wishaw Squire. 

R. C. Hartman's Ellwyn Gay was served by More- 
ton Eclipse on the 16th inst. 



teenth, J. E. Cullison, Portland, 85; fifteenth, Maurice 
Abrahams, Portland, 84.82; sixteenth, A. J. Winters, 
Portland, 84.4; seventeenth L. A. Walkei, Woodland, 
Cal., 83.7. 

Following is a complete list of the 149 participants 
in the shoot, together with number of targets shot at 
and total percentage: 



The judges announced for the Independent Field 
Trials Club trials are: J. A. Graham, St. Louis; Dr. 
M. F. Rogers, New Albany, Miss., and Marsh Byers, 
Grand Rapids. 

AT THE TRAPS. 



Following the Interstate shoot — the Pacific Coast 
Handicap at Ingleside in September — it is planned by 
Medford, Or., sportsmen to give a big tournament 
with from $500 to $1000 in added money, enough at all 
events to induce a large attendance of shooters from 
all over the Coast and Northwest, including a majority 
of the Eastern cracks who will be here in September. 



Although rather late in the day, we publish the 
following list of averages shot, at the recent North- 
west Tournament (June 22-3-4) and sent us by a 
Northern correspondent. It is record matter and 
many of our trap shooting readers will no doubt 
avail themselves of this opportunity to place the 
data of the 21st annual Sportsmen's Association tour- 
nament in their scrapbooks. 

Average events counted up 580 targets — All of these 
races were unknown angles save — Multnomah medal, 
known aDgles, reversed pull, 25 targets; Bro-ivnlee 
trophy, unknown angles, reversed pull, 25 targets, 
both barrels; Walla Walla Brownlee medal, 20 tar- 
gets, expert rules, indicator pull, known angles, four 
unknown and one known trap, one man up; Globe 
trophy, 50 targets, 10 known traps, unknown angles — 
10 known traps, unknown angles, reversed pull, use of 
both barrels — 10 known traps, known angles — 10 
known traps, known angles, reversed pull — 5 pairs, one 
man up; Individual Championship, 25 targets, known 
traps, known angles 

W. F. Sheard, of Tacoma, was high average with 
90 6%, A. J. Webb, of San Francisco, was a close 
second with 89.8%, only .8 behind the winner, a very 
close margin. The following is the further list of 
general average prize winners: 

Third, J. W. Brad rick, of San Francisco, 88.7; 
fourth, A. P. Bisrelow, of Ogden, 88.03; fifth, G. W. 
Miller, Tacoma; E. G. Livingstone, Montana; J. P. 
Holohan, Wallace, Ida ; Dell Cooper, Bellingham, all 
87.58 percent; sixth, E. Schultz, San Francisco. 87.4; 
seventh, M. O. Feudner, San FraDcieco, 87 2; eighth, 
Harry Ellis, Portland, 87.05; ninth, J Smails, Walla 
Walla; E. J. Chlngreen, Spokane, both 86 89; tenth, 
Wagner, Portland, 86.55; eleventh, J. W. Hu9e, 
Billings, Mont., 86 37; twelfth, W. A. Hlllls, Portland, 
86.2; thirteenth, W. E. Carlon, Portland, 85 35; four- 



Name— Shot at 

H Katun 175 

W J Sewell 580 

A DStlllman 580 

A Cowing 400 

H Gilchrist 270 

W A Hlllls 580 

Maclaughlln 680 

E E Ellis 580 

Lougee 555 

A C Clewey 185 

J T Hlllls 560 

Capt. Thompson 485 

Dieuderer 485 

Melss 450 

Del Cooper 580 

Frank Howe 5^5 

W F Sheard 580 

W Miller 580 

T F Smith 490 

E G Confarr 580 

Al Guist 580 

M Abrahams 580 

H Ellis : 580 

J Cullison 580 

W E Carlon 580 

J P Holohan 580 

Hugh France 580 

VV H Seaver 580 

Dennis 425 

I. A Smith 580 

J W Hughes 580 

W A Selvldge 580 

A P Blgelow 580 

Dloker»on 580 

WR Thomas 580 

T B Ware 580 

J Moolne 580 

E J Chlngreen 580 

Dorn . 205 

W Miller 580 

A J Winters 580 

Mrs Sheard 580 

Helman 350 

Enyart 350 

Hafer 350 

J T Downs 580 

L A Walker 580 

J W Humble 350 

H P Jaoobsen 290 

Collier 580 

C D Plank 580 

L G Smith 390 

H H Knell 530 

B DMahan 385 

R H Berg 470 

F M By bee 225 

N McMillan 465 

F Mosely 175 

H McElroy 140 

1 Johnson 315 

M O Feudner 580 

E Schultz 580 

A J Webb 580 

E Holling 580 

CA Halght 580 

J W Bradrick 580 

W S Wattles 200 

RC Reed 580 

D W King, Jr 580 

White 580 

R Wade ' 150 

H C Watkins 175 

J Lewis 190 

S Wray 200 

W R Campbell 125 

R V Rowe 540 

J Cooper 420 

E B Lannlng 580 

T W Cooper 445 

Dr Dab 1 580 

J S Jent 540 

H Cole 115 

O E Butler 280 

SCotlison 280 

C Green 330 

J Stevenson 235 

W W Sides 105 

E H Miller 105 

D Burgess 135 

L Reed 255 

H B Kershaw 580 

J Smalls 580 

H OPeck 350 

W A Robertson 85 

B W Brady 490 

F Lorgsdon 445 

E Shields v 255 

W F Brown 445 

L E McDonald 445 

J Hlnkle -. 445 

J Van Eaton 300 

H Palmer 435 

J Cunningham 210 

H A Cook 305 

T A Logsdon 220 

Wagner 580 

F L Carter 495 

Shelton 400 

Caldwell 115 

A L Hall 160 

F E Reed 85 

Grimn 230 

HaiDe 105 

J Byerly 165 

Stacy 445 

Seavers 375 

Hacker 560 

G Palmer 270 

F Mclntyre 175 

Q L Buland 150 

H N Peabody 150 

R L Starkey 180 

L L Blaok 95 

DC Holmes 85 

J Palmer 45 

J n McElwaln 150 

L C Mapes 880 

B Hoflman 90 

Rvan 150 

H L Casey 150 

Brockbank 240 

Mrs Young 880 

P J Baltimore 200 

Mrs Holmes 90 

Burnett 355 

D W Fleet 245 

(; I) Snyder 285 

E Pea«e 180 

WT Sherry 50 

W A Sturdevant 40 

G W Kay 60 

S C Culvert 30 

"Oregon" 25 

Hudson 25 

R D Inman 105 

J S Hunt 30 

H L Keep .' 30 

E E Young 50 

Mrs Snyder 85 



Per cent 
74 
81 
77 
71 
71 

86.21 
78 

84.82 

80 

75 

72 

72 

68 

54 

87.58 

73 

90.6 

87.58 

80 

87 58 
81 

84.82 
87.05 
85 

85.35 
87.58 
70 

88 79 
69 
83 

86.37 
85 

88.13 

85 

82 

78 

65 

86.89 

74 

82.5 

84 4 

64 

81 

77 

79 

87 2 

83.7 

82 

67 

IS 

89 3 
69 
79 
78 
79 
81 
83 
81 
58 
76 
87 2 
87.4 
89 8 
86 2 
80 
88.7 
73 5 
88.4 
86.7 
73.4 
85.3 
85.1 
74 
85 
71 
82 
69 
78 
76 
82.4 
84 
80 
68 
74 
76 
65 
57 
54 
77 
87 
72.9 
86 
81 
82 
77 
86 
74 
81 
77 
81 
64 
79 

71 
80 
70 

86.56 

85 

81 

80 

70 

48 

77 

82 

66 

77 

80 

81 
84 
61 
67 
68 
65 
55 
70 
73 
77 
85 
80 
75 
81 
51 
46 
46 
62 
75 
84 
86 
69 
60 
55 
88 
43 
28 
64 
68 
66 
76 
76 
61 



A blue rock club was recently organized at Gardner- 
ville, Nev. 



The trap shooting function tomorrow that is of 
much Interest to local sportsmen is the meeting unde 
the auspices of the Vallejo Gun Club at the Flos den 
Station grounds near Vallejo. The feature of the day 
will be the five man team shoot by squads represen king 
the Golden Gate, Union and Empire Gun Clubs of San 
b rancisco, Santa Rosa Gun Club, Hercules Gun Club 
of Pinole, St Helena and Vallejo Gun Clubs. The 
shoot will bo for a trophy and is the Initial meet of a 
series of shoo. s until the trophy has been won twice 
by a contending team— the schedule states "best two 
out of three wins." As there is no assurance that the 
same club will win twice out of three shoots, the 
chance for an extremely interesting series of shoots is 
a good one. There will be optional side pools, high 
guns, one money for each three entries. M. A. Clark 
of the Vallejo Gun Club will beCaptain of the day and 
popular Thos. L. Lewis, Secretary of the Union Gun 
Club, will act as manager of the shoot. A large at- 
tendance is anticipated for the Vallejo sportsmen are 
good fellows and painstaking entertainers. 

The Union Gun Club monthly shoot on the 10th 
inst. was well attended for a July shoot and good 
scores were the average. "Slade"being one of the 
participants to make excellent scores. Among the 
visitors were J. Ed Vaughan of Santa Ana who broke 
23 and 20 targets from tbe 10 yard peg, W. A. Robert- 
son 21, B. Baird 17 and Ed Schultz 23. 

The unusual number of ties shot off is an indication 
of how keenly the different events were contested 
The final race for the Phil B. Bekeart trophy was won 
by Otto Feudner. The summaries of scores follows: 

Club match, members only, 25 targets, $40 added (10 
for each class, Rose system, 5-3-2), 16 yards: 

Champion class— M. O. Feudner 24, E. L Forster 23, 
L. Hawxhurst 23, C. A. Haight 20, F. Feudner 20, A. 
J. Webb 20, M. J. Ivorson 16. Every shooter was in 
the money but Iverson. 

First clasb— II. D. Swales 24, "Slade" 22, W. R. 
Murdock 21, W. A. Searles 21, Dr. Pltres 21, C. S. 
Fish 20, T. L. Lewis 20. Money won by all but the 
two 20 men. 

Second class— W. Janssen 21, C. T. Mitchell 20, 
J. Pisani 19, A. M. Shields 19, C. Frankel 18, H. P. 
Jacobsen 18, F. Knlck 18, E. Taylor 14. Janssen, 
Mitchell, Pisani and Shields won the class purse. 

Third class— C. T. Harvey 22, W. Schneider 19, J. 
W. Biller 17, Dr. Finnie 17, F. W. Woods, Jr. 16, F. 
Turner 15, Dr. Bodkin 11, J. L. Dutton 11, B. Patrick 
11 Harvey, Schneider, Biller and Finnie annexed 
the money. 

Medal match, members only, 25 targets, 16 yards 
(previous winners 18 and 20 yards;: 

Champion class— Webb 22. Hawxhurst 22, E L 
Forster (20 yards) 22, M O Feudner 21, Haight 21, 
Iverson (18 yards) 19. Shoot-off, Webb 23, Forster 
22, Hawxhurst 22, Webb won the class meaal for the 
month. 

First class— II D Swales 23, "Slade" 23, Searles (18 
yards) 21; Pitres(18 yards) 19, Murdock 17. Swales 
was awarded the monthly medal, "Slade" did not 
shoot off with him. 

Second class— Shields 19, Mitchell 19, Jacobsen 19, 
Janssen (20 yards) 18, Taylor 17, Frankel 14, Knick 
(18 yards) 14, Pisani 14. Shields won the shoot off for 
the medal, Shields 21, Mitchel 21, Jacobsen 17; Shields 
19, Mitchell 17. 

Third class— Woods, Jr., 19, Biller 16, Harvey 16, 
Turner 15, Dutton (20 yards) 13, Finnie 13, Patrick 
(18 yards) 12, Schneider 11, Bodkin 9. Woods was 
the medal winner. 

Added money event, 15 singles 16 yards, 5 pairs 14 
yards, class shooting, 3 moneys. $5 added, open to all. 

Doubles Singles Total 

Swales 6 

Searles : 6 

Feudner, C 9 

Iverson 7 

Kniok 3 

Schneider '. 5 

Webb 8 

Pltres 5 

Jaoobsen 3 

Pisani 4 

Hajgbt 6 

Mitchell 7 

Hauxhurst 7 

Harvey 5 

Lewis 6 

Sohultz 9 

Feudner, F 5 

Janssen 8 

Secret handicap, serial race for Tuckey and Klein 
trophv, 25 targets limit members only, 16 yards: 

Schneider 23, Patrick 18, Taylor 23, Pltres 24, 
Woods 20, Dutton 21, Harvey 18, Janssen 23, Hawx- 
hurst 21, "Slade" 25, O. Feudner 24, Turner 19 
Shields 23, Haight 22, Baird 17, RoberUon 21, Biller 
19, Jacobsen 23, Frankel 18, Iverson 18, Haight 24, 
Schultz 23, Lewis 20. 

Phil B. Bekeart perpetual challenge trophy race, 
100 targets, 16 yards, ontrance $5: 

Feudner, M. 23 23 24 23 -93 

Webb. . 23 24 24 22 -93 

Schultz, E 23 23 23 24-93 

Hawxhurst 25 23 12 21—91 

Haight 19 21 19 20-79 

Shoot off at 50 targets— Feudner 22, 24—46; Schultz 
23, 22—45; Webb 23. 19—42. 

The Vallejo Gun Club shoot on the 9th inst. was 
well attended, a number of Napa shooters were 
present. Captain Chappell's team outshot Captain 
Drake's team twice. The Bcores in the club race at 
25 targets were: Chappell 22, Beverldge 22, Comfort 
21, O'Hara 21, Brown 20, Rohner 19, Hlrschle 18, 
Clarke 18, Morgan 18, Carter 18, S. Maglstrinl 18, 
Burnett 18, Drake 17, Mayfield 17, P. Magistrini 16, 
White 16, Ellas 15, Fit/.patrick 14, Shouse 13. 

The Napa Gun Club was organized July 7th at a 
meeting held in the office of Dr. Frank Rohner. S. 
L. Mayfield was. elected president of the club and 
team captain, Dr. Rohner was elected secretary and 
Cbas. Reams was made treasurer of tbe organization. 
The club intends to secure a shooting range in East 
Napa, and will hold blue rock and live pigeon shoots 
regularly. A number of Napa sportsmen are taking 
enthusiastic interest in the organization. 



13 


19 


10 


16 


11 


20 


14 


21 


11 


14 


4 


9 


13 


21 


11 


16 


12 


15 


11 


15 


11 


16 


9 


16 


14 


21 


12 


17 


7 


13 


13 


22 


18 


17 


10 


18 



10 



[July 22, 19(5 



The Bakersfield Blue Rock Club shoot on the 9th 
Inst, wasslimly attended, warm weather and vacation 
time kept many members away. Getchell came to the 
front with 87«V, Stoner was second and Jewett third, 
all good averages as the following scores show: 

Shot at Broke Percent 



Qctcuell 
Stoner . . . 
Jewett ... 
ScoUold .. 



Ferguson. 
Oswald. 



no 


96 


87 


110 


94 


85 


110 


86 


78 


110 


82 


74 


110 


66 


60 


110 


62 


56 


70 


88 


54 



There was a larger attendance than usual, J uly 2d, 
at the weekly shoot of the Blue Rock Club at their 
grounds near Recreation Park. The honors of the 
day were carried off by Mr. Scofield, with Captain 
Shafter a close second and Tupman third. 

Much improvement is noted in tbe shooting of a 
number of the members since the club was organized, 
as will be seen by the following score: 

Shot at Broke Percent. 



Scofleld .. 
Shatter... 
Tupman. , 
Oetcneli' , 



Day- ... 
Nelson . 
HlgglM . 



Hochhetmer. M. 



145 


127 


87 


95 


82 


86 


125 


106 


84 


150 


125 


80 


85 


67 


79 


160 


126 


78 


125 


97 


77 


125 


96 


75 


75 


54 


73 


135 


97 


71 


95 


67 


70 


1 15 


98 


68 


100 


61 


61 


100 


59 


59 



The Grants Pass Gun Club held a blue rock tourna 
ment July 4th and 5th. Every shooter in attendance 
spoke loud in praise of the hospitable entertainment 
received from the club membprs and management 
Mr. Thos. Armstrong, late of Peoria, 111., managed 
the tournament in a very satisfactory manner, every 
detail which tends to make a shoot run properly was 
looked after. Mr. Armstrong is an old live-bird shot 
and proved his skill by 'Voing some" at the clay 
birls. "Dick"Reod made high average 93. 5%. D. 
W. King, Jr., representative for Ballistite powder, 
made the longest run, G9 straight. First high ama- 
teur average was made by R. L. Bartlett 84 5° , 
second high amateur average, T. Armstrong 83 6%. 



July Tribulation. 

I jes' set here a-dreamin— 

A-dreamin' every day, 
Ut the sunshine that's a-gleamin' 

On the rivers far away. 
An' I kinder (all to wlshln' 

I wuz wher' the waters swish, 
Fer If the Lord made tlshin' 

Why a feller oughter fish. 
If I'm standln' or a-hikln' 

'Bout the dusty, rusty town, 
I alius feel t'-e trout a-strlUIn' 

I kin see the spoon spin roun' 
An' the sunshine seem's a-tanglin', 

Uv the sbadders cool and sweet 
An' the mornin' glories are a-danglin' 

Wher' the willers an' alders meet. 
So I kick and git a-wlshln' 

I wuz wher' the waters swish, 
Fer If the Lord made Ushtn'— 

Why a feller oughter Hsh. 



UARYSVILLE CAMP STEW. 

At the recent annual camp stew of the Grass Valley 
Sportsmen's Club about 250 congenial spirits were 
present and drank, ate, made merry and had a jolly 
time all day such as only can be enjoyed at this 
time-honored and wholesouled yearly gathering of 
sportsmen. 

With the faint stroaks of morning showing in the 
eastern sky the faithful ones crawled out, started the 
fires and began preparations for breakfast. There 
was little time to wait. From Nevada City, Grass 
Valley, Auburn, Colfax, Spenceville, Smartsville and 
other places rigs began to arrive bearing hungry 
mortals whose appetites bad been sharpened by the 
long ride in the crisp morniag air. Then the cooks 
did a business which would shame any quick order 
house in the country. T. W. B. Golding, W. H. 
Smith and Elmer Roberts presided over the region of 
steaks and chops, bacon and liver and glorious rich, 
aromatic coffee that would have made any housewife 
jealous. Henry Campbell prepared the salad. Then 
with milk, bread and butter, the meal was complete. 
And eat! Every new arrival seemed hungrier than 
the one before. All were apparently hol'ow clear to 
their feet. It was a genuine pleasure to watch them 
devour the rich, juicy steaks and stow away vast 
quantities of other things. Joke and hearty laughter 
rang around tbe long tables, making the most con- 
firmed dyspeptic forget his infirmity and do justice 
to a meal undertbe pines which would haveastonished 
a section hand. Until 10 o'clock breakfast was served 
and the waiters were kept on the jump to the finish. 

Up to noon the hunters came in from afield, but all 
had the same hard luck story — no doves. This had 
been expected, however, and ample provision made to 
substitute chickens. Instead of 1200 doves, tbe num- 
ber brought in a year ago, 100 would cover the bag. 
Ward Mitchell bagged twenty two, the record of the 
day. The Marysville contingent brought two dozen 
tame ducks, and others provided rabbits and other 
game." 

Then the arrangements began for the great and 
only stew. Captain George R. Tuttle, Gennett Opie, 
William Provis, W. J. Grenfell, J. C. Conaway, A. F. 
Brady, J. C. Tyrrell, James Lucas and others peeled 
spuds, while Dr. Grown, Wm Connors, A. J. Brock- 
ington, Con Sullivan, John Hammill, Lee Garthe, 
Superintendent of Schools O'Neill and Henry Posner 
removed the feathers from defunct birds. The clean- 
ing department was conducted by Elmer Roberts and 
Ed. Paynter. 



Maurice O'Connell, that king of camp stew chefs, 
took charge of the big affair, as in years past, and 
with James Phillips and the rest of his able assistants, 
soon had the kettles bubbling forth savory odors 
which told appetizingly of the feast to come. 

During the preparatory Btew period the time was 
spent in whole-souled fun. All dignity was cast aside 
and like big boys tbe men, young and old, many staid 
men of affairs, the big gathering laughed, frolicked, 
sang and made merry. Running, jnmping and other 
sports, followed by songs, addresses and stories, 
whiled waitingappetite6into patience and good humor. 
A quartette composed of Messrs. James and Archie 
Crase, Harry Morgan and Louis Hooper, rendered 
numerous selections. The young men have rare good 
voices and sang with great feeling old war songs, negro 
melodies and popular pieces. 

If any set of men know how to have a good time, 
and at the same time induce everybody else to do the 
same, the Marysville visitors are that set. They came 
to the picnic in a carry-all and several carriages, with 
a choice stock of liquid refreshments, and kept open 
house all day. 

The club, at its stand, dispensed cold refreshments 
from morn till night with lavish band, free to all. A 
competent force of "mahogany artists" ladled out the 
wet goods. 

At 4 o'clock the summons to the feast met with 
immediate response, and in a few minutes tbe three 
long tables were surrounded by as hungry a lot of 
mortals as had helped to demolish breakfast. O'Con- 
nell had the stew done to the second. Plenty of liquids 
and other good things accompanied the steaming, 
savory mess, adding zest to the feast. 

Hon. J. R. Tywell presided as toastmaster with his 
usual genially and graceful tact. Among the speak- 
ers who added their quota to the good things of the 
day were Superior J u<ige Nilon, who responded in a 
humorous and apt style to the toast "A True Sports- 
man." Dr. Taggart of Stockton related in a happy 
vein his "First Impression of a Camp Stew." Dr. 
Julian Dobbins rendered vocal selections, pleasirjg as 
ever. "Jack" Collins of Marysville said u few words 
about "The Tule Hunting Club. " District Attorney 
Jones' theme was the "Vacant Chair," L'ncle George 
Bromley was prssent and his remarks were listened to 
with rapt attention. Hon. J. V. Snyder responded to 
the toast, "Our Sister City, Nevada." 

In the many years' history of the club never has it 
given its friends a more delightful day in the woods, 
nor one which will be recalled years hence with more 
pleasure. And yet to many a tinge of sadness crept 
into the day, as absent faces were pictured in mem- 
ory — faces of men whose presence in past years has 
done much to enliven the day. Death has summoned 
genial "Tom" Sherwood and others, who, year after 
year attended with religious punctuality. H. T. 
Payne could not be present, nor could Captain J. K. 
Orr and Dr. Crawford of Berkeley, each of whom 
sent regrets. 

A CAMP GRILL THAT COCK8. 

A handy, convenient and properly working camp 
cook stove or cooking apparatus of any kind has been 
an object of long and presistent search by sportsmen 
and campers out for many a day. Many contraptions 
have been put on the market, most of them are cast 
aside with disgust after a short period of unsatis- 
factory usage. 

The be9t thing in this line we have seen yet is a 
grill, designed somewhat after the U. S. Army 
company cooking stove or grill A strong oblong 
iron frame is arranged for two-thirds of its length 
with transverse iron rods, the other third is crossed 
with heavy short Iron slats, bent in the middle, trans- 
versely, at almost a right angle. Four flat iron up. 
rights are made to hold the grill over the coals. 

The whole apparatus is simple, handy and easy 
to pack. Tbe arrangement of the cross rods and slats 
is such that one can do any kind of broiling, toasting, 
baking, cooking or stewing with a number of utensils 
all on at the same time and with less bother and better 
than any other contrivance offered for outdoor cook- 
ing. The range was designed by Mr. Ubas. Rollo 
Peters, it is patented, and can be seen or bought at 
the store of Clabrough, Golcher & Co., 538 Market 
St.. S. F. 

TRADE NOTES. 



AVERAGES REPORTED 

Chatham, Ont., June 1st and 2d, H. D. Bates of 
Ridgetown, Ont., first general average. 306 out of 335, 
shooting "Du Pont." H. Scane of Ridgetown, Ont., 
second general average, 305 out of 335, shooting "Du 
Pont." J. Oldershaw of Chatham, Ont , third general 
average, 296 out of 335, shooting "Du Pont." 

Cedar Springs, Ohio, June 5th and 6th, R L. 
Trimble, shooting "Infallible," and C. A. Young, 
shooting "Du Pont,"t ! ed for first general average, 
298outof330. D. A. Upson of Cleveland, O., first 
amateur and second general average, 296 out of 330, 
shooting "Du Pont." R. O. Heikes, third general 
average, 293 out of 330, shooting "Du Pont." Frank 
Snow of Brooklyn, O , 6econd amateur average, 292 
out of 330, shooting "Du Pont." W. R. Randall of 
Mason, Ohio, third amateur average, 289 out of 330, 
shooting "Du Pont." 

Lowell, Ind., June 7th and 8th, W. D. Stannard, 
first general average, 374 out of 400, shooting "Du 
Pont." J. B. Barto of Chicago, 111., tied for first 
amateur and second general averare, 369 out of 400, 
shooting "Du Pont." Hugh M. Clark of Wabash 
Ind., second amateur and third general average, 367 
out of 400, shooting "Du Pont." 

Camden, Ark., June 7th and 8th, T. E. Hubby, first 
general average, 406 oue of 420. shooting "Infallible. 
JoeChatfield of Texarkan*. Tex , first amate ir and 
second general average, 393 out of 420, shooting 
"Infallible." Ed Brady of Memphis, Tenn., second 
amateur and third general average, 390 out of 420, 
shooting "Du Pont." 

Waterbury, Conn., June 13th, Harold Money, first 



general average, 180 out of 190, shooting "New E. C " 
(Improved). C. H. Finch of Thompkinsville, Conn., 
first amateur and Becond general average, 169 out of 
190, shooting "DuPont." H. Metcalf of Rockville, 
Conn., shooting "Infallible," and Dr. McElligott of 
Waterbury, Conn., shooting "New Schultze," tied for 
second amateur and third general average, 168 out of 
190. Mr. Oxford, of New London, Conn., third ama- 
teur average, 167 out of 190, shooting "Infallible." 

PETERS' POINTS. 

The good work being done with Peters' factory 
loaded shells goes on without interruption. At the 
Grand American Handicap, June 27 to 30, there was 
much comment upon the very handsome appearance 
of these goods, and their perfect shooting"qualitiee. 
They were used by fully 25% of the contestants, and 
in some of the matches by an even greater proportion. 
Many excellent and even phenomenal scores were 
made with them. The Consolation Handicap, one of 
the big events of the tournament, was won by Mr 
James T. Atkinson, of New Castle, Pa , with Peters' 
Ideal shells. He stood at tbe 18-yard line, and broke 
99 out of 100. One other contestant tied with Mr. 
Atkinson, but in the shoot off. the latter won 18 to 17. 
In this match two scores of 98, five of 97, four of 96, 
and twenty-seven other scores of over 90% were made 
with these goods. 

In the Preliminary Handicap, Mr. Wm. Veacb, of 
Falls City, Neb., scored 97 out of 100 from the 18 yard 
mark. On the first day of the tournament Mr. L H. 
Reid finished with 99 out of 100; and Mr Luther 
Wade had a run of 113 straight to his credit. On 
practice day, June 26, Mr. Frank See tied for high 
average, 99 out of 100. All these gentlemen used 
Peters' regular factory loads. These und other 
equally notable performances at the famous GraDd 
American Handicap ahowed that Peters' shells rray 
be relied upon for perfect results, no matter how im- 
portant the issue at stake. 

At Binghamton, N. Y., June 20 and 21, Mr. Neaf 
Apgar won high average, breaking 380 out of 400. At 
the Rohrers Island shoot, Dayton, Ohio, June 13, Mr. 
R. S. Rhoads was high gun with 187 out of 200. At 
St. Paris, Ohio, a few days later he won high average 
for both days, scoring 332 out Of 350. At Converse, 
Ind , June 22 and 23, high average first day was won 
by Mr. Austin Flynn, and on the second day by Dr. 
M. Wilson, both using Peters shells. 

GRAND AMERICAN HANDICAP. 

The sixth Grand American Handicap at inanimate 
targets, held at Indianapolis, Ind., from June 27th to 
30th, inclusive, under the auspices of the Indianapolis 
Gun Club, was indeed the largest and most successful 
meet of its kind ever held in America. Of the many 
successful ones who carried away honors we should 
mention R R. Barber, of Paullina, Iowa, and W. R. 
Crosby, who won amateur aad professional averages 
respectively. Mr R R. Barber, an amateur from 
Paullina, Iowa, won the big event at Indianapolis 
from a field of 335 of the best shots in America with a 
score of 99 out of 100, and the preliminary with a score 
of 98 out of 100. In tbe Consolation Handicap he 
scored 97 out of 100, and he also made a run of 157 
straight. Mr. Barber's scores 99, 98 and 97 establish 
a new world's record for the three events. This new 
Togo of the shooting world ; W. R. Crosby, who won 
the first professional average with a score of 298 out 
of 300; Fred Gilbert, who won second professional 
average with a score of 295 out of 300, and tbe winner 
of the high amateur average, all shot Winchester 
"Leader" shells, the reliable, the uniform, the win- 
ning k'nd —the only kind to shoot. Billy Crosby has 
held the world 's long run record of 345 stra'ght since 
March 31, 1901, and now makes another world's rec- 
cord of 419 straight, with Winchester "Leader" 
shells. 

REMINGTON AUTOMATIC SHOTGUN. 

Announcement is made that the Remington Im- 
proved Automatic will be ready for the trade on or 
about August 15tb. The new model of the gun de- 
signed by John M. Browning has a number of im- 
provements that will be acceptable to sportsmen. 
The take down action has been strengthened and 
simplified, tbe stock is improved in shape and made 
of an extra good selection of walnut. The breech is 
locked now with a double bolt. The fore-end screw 
is reinforced with a double collar and the head of tbe 
magazine cylinder has now a strong, square screw 
thus improving these particular parts of the maga- 
zine and spring mechanism to tbe desired extent of 
durability and perfect action. A noticeable change Is 
the ad mirable balance of the new model which is de- 
signed to shoot six shots and is made in 7 grades 
ranging in price from $30 to $150, in 12-gauge only, 
28 inches regular length of barrels. The higher 
grades are handsomely engraved, with plain or grip 
checkered stocks of the best walnuts procurable, and 
in every respect is a shotgun that will be a favorite 
with sportsmen. 

Mr. Browning is the owner of the first gun turned 
out by the Remington works, President M. Hartly has 
gun No. 2 and Mr. E. E Drake is the possessor of No 3. 

GOOD SHOOTING IN OREGON. 

Selby Factory Loaded Shells are familiar to and 
used by the majority of the sportsmen of tbe Pacific 
Coast. At the recent tournament of the Grants Pass 
Gun Club, R. C. Reed shot high average, 93.5. R. L. 
Bartlett was first amateur average 84.5, and Tbos. 
Armstrong 83 6%, second amateur average. D. W. 
King, Jr., made the best consecutive run, 69. These 
good scores were made with 8elby Factory Loaded 
Shells — ammunition tbat is always ready and reliable. 

EXCELLENT RESULTS. 

A.J. Webb, who won the Northwest Individual 
Target Championship recently at Portland, Phil 
B. Bekeart challenge cup at Ingleside, also won the 
Empire Gun Club Championship, the Sweeney Record 
Medal and tied for club high average for 1905. Webb 
shoots an L. C. Smith hammerless and has done so 
for years past. 



July 22. 1905J 



GLtie givcedcv auo g porta mem 



11 



THE FARM. 




To Preserve the Aroma ot Butter 




One may delay the doing of many 
things without loss, but to put off churn- 
ing when the cream is ripe, is not in the 
list. The mistake must not be made of 
thinking that butter is made by churn- 
ing. It is being made from the time tde 
milk is drawn until it is churned. No 
amount of doctoring will cure a poor 
quality of butter. It is of the utmost 
importance that the churn be scrupul- 
ously clean and sweet smelling before 
using. In order to have it so, it must be 
washed immediately after using, scalded 
and set where it will be thoroughly aired 
and dried, writes Mrs A. C. MePherson 
in Orange Judd Farmer. KiDsing in 'ime 
water o casionally is of benefit and will 
remove the musty odors which sometime 
linger around churns. The putting of 
cold water into the churn after cleansing', 
as practiced by some dairymen, is not to 
be recommended, as a very unpleasant 
odor will be developed in a day or two, 
especially if the day is warm. 

After scalding the churn, preparatory 
to using, it must be rinsed in cold water, 
or elsed a woody smell will be imparted 
to the cream. All wooden utensils used 
in dairy work should be washed in tepid 
water first, and afterward scaldtd, rinsed 
and dried. The dishcloth must never be 
used in dairy work. If a cloth is ever 
necessary, it must be for that one use. 
Woodenware can be cleansed more 
rapidly, neatly and satisfactorily with the 
aid of a brush ; either rice straw or bristle 
brush should be kept for this puipose 
alone. 

If a concussion churn is used, when 
the butter oegins to come— when about 
the size of a grain of wheat — the churn 
should be stopped for five or more min- 
utes, or until the granules rise to the top. 
The buttermilk must then be drained off 
and cold water added to work the butter 
in the churn. A skimmer may be used 
to remove the butter from the churn. 
This should be when it is firm and well 
rinsed. The butter now in the granular 
state must be drained and salted with the 
best dairy salt. 

We prefer to salt butter after it is re- 
moved from the i hum, rather than brine 
salt it. We salt at the rate of 1% ounces 
salt per pound and think it adds to the 
keeping qualities of the butter, better 
than the ounce to the pound method. 
Patrons find no fault with our butter so 
prepared. We work lightly, just enough 
to incorporate the salt evenly, without 
mashing and smearing it We press and 
touch it lightly and daintily, shape it, or 



cut it into any desired form and peck it 
ready for market. The sooner it is de- 
livered the better. The delicate aroma 
which all well-made butter has is very 
evanescent, and when made in rolls or 
packages, exposure to the air soon dis- 
sipates this delicate flavor. Cold storage 
does not help to retain this flavor. Pack- 
ing in jars so as to exclude the air is the 
only way to retain it. The market value 
of butter depends upon its flavor more 
than any other quality. Appearance 
should be given due prominence, but 
flavor is paramount. 



PHOENIX, ARIZONA 



$12,000 



$12,000 



FIRST ARIZONA TERRITORIAL FAIR 

DECEMBER 4-9, 1905. 



Warranted to Give Satisfaction. 

Gombault's 

Caustic Balsam 




Has Imitators But No Competitors. 

A Safe, Speedy and Positive Cure for 
Curb, Splint. Sweeny, Capped Hock, 
Strained Tcndoni, Founder, Wind 
Purl's, and all lameness from Spavin, 
Ringbone and other bony tumors. 
Cures all skin diseases or Parasites, 
Thrush, Diphtheric Removes all 
Bunches from Horses or Cattle. 

As a Human Remedy for Rheumatism, 
Sprains, Sore Throat, etc. It Is Invaluable. 

livery bottle of Caustic Balsam "old Is 
Warranted to (rive satfttractlou. Price $1 50 
per bottle. Sold by druggist*, or sent by ex- 
press, charges paid, with full directions for 
Its use. t3TSend for descriptive circulars, 
testimonials, etc. Address M , 

•The Lawrence-Williams Co., Cleveland, 



New Attack by Oleo. 

The safety of pure butter from compel i 
tion with oleomargarine is again menaced 
if certain reports from the East are 
correct. As all thote identified with the 
butter industry of the country know, the 
protection that butter epjoya from its 
spurious competitor lies in the fact that 
butter producers have permission to col 
their product to a shade that suits the 
demand of the trade, whenever the color 
is lacking, wlv'ch it is under certain con 
dit ons of feed, as governed by climate, 
season?, certain conditions of soil and 
with the great majority of the cows of the 
country. In times past, butter was made 
mostly from natural pasturage which 
gives a rich, yellow shade to butter and 
in this way the public taste many years 
ago, was educated to demand a yellow 
Bhade in its butter. Now a-days we make 
butter in winter as well as in summer. 
The natural pastures of the Eastern Btates 
can produce only a small proportion of 
the country's butter supply, and the 
clover and alfalfa fields of the Western 
states must be drawn upon. Neither is it 
profitable to keep a cow in idleness when 
the pastures are not green. But the 
butter made under these conditions, while 
superior in every other respect to the old 
time Eastern butter, lacks the yellow 
color to make it acceptable to the average 
taste, and hence arose out of necessity 
the practice of coloring butter. 

This may not be done with oleomar- 
garine under the law of congress, and 
most of the states. This permission was 
denied to that product by law, because it 
was done for the purpose of fraud. It is 
this permission to color butter that stands 
in the way of the oleomargarine fraud 
The oleomargarine interests tried by 
every device to prevent the anti-color bill 
from becoming a law. They tried to de 
feat it in the courts after it became a law, 
but signally failed. 

Now they propose a new method of 
attack Unfortunately thev seem to have 
with them the chief chemist of the United 
States Department of Agriculture, Dr, H 
I. Wi'ey, who, in the in'erest of purity in 
food?, is decrying artificial coloring. Of 
course this looks to the oleomargarine 
interestshkethings coming their way and 
they are keeping very quiet about it. If 
they have such a leader as Dr. Wiley to 
lend himself to their scheme we may rest 
assured they will see that sinews of war 
are not lacking. There is, and will be for 
many y< ars to come, much legislation by 
congress on the food question. This will 
give them tiieir opportunity to fight for 
legislation to p-event the coloring of 
butter under their pretended interests in 
pure foods. The same thing is being 
agitated in several states. If the oleomar- 
garine people can have their way, they 
will either block all pure food legislation, 
or insist upon it including the prevention 
of coloring butter. 

Eastern dairy organizations seem to be 
on the alert, however, and have entered 
the fight again in opposition to the 
schemes of the ole margarine makers. 
It behooves every dairyman to watch 
closely developments along this line in 
the future — Dairy and Produce Review- 



(Under Control of the Territory) 

TROTTING AND PACING STAKES. 

No. 1 — 2:35 Class, trotting 

No. 2 — 2:22 Class, trotting 

No. 3—2:10 Class, trotting 

No. 4 — 2:30 Class, pacing 

No. 5 — 2:17 Class, pacing 

No. 6 — Free=for-all, pacing 



$1000 
1000 
1000 
1000 
1000 
1000 



No. 7 — Arizona Two=year=olds, trotting, entrance money added 200 

No. 8 — Arizona Yearlings, trotting, entrance money added 200 

No. 9 — Arizona Two=year°olds, pacing, entrance money added 200 

No. 10 — Arizona Yearlings, pacing, entrance money adjed 200 

SlOO Purses will be opened Inter for 2:30, 2:25, 2:10, 2:15, Free-for-all, and Three- 
year-old Trotters; 2:28, 2:22, 2:13, 2:09, and Three-year-old Pacers 
S1200 will also he offered for Running Races to be announced later. 



CONDITION'S GOVKRNINO I1AKNKSS RACKS. 



Provide a creep for the lambs so they 
may get away from the ewes, and give 
them plenty of oats, bran and nutted oil 
cake. Careful experiments have proved 
this method to be quite profitable. 



Entries to .stakes Nos. 1.2,3, 4, 5 and i olose 
Wednesday, November I: but entries may be 
made at any time prior to that date In any 
stake to which a horse Is eligible at the date of 
making entry, and no record obtained after 
date of making entry will be a bar. Entry 
fees to stakes Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4 5 and 6, payable: $15 
at time of making entry; $15 November 1st, N 
the evening before the race. 

Stakes Nos 7 and 9 to be half mile heats, best 
three in Ave. 

Stakes Nos. 8 and 10 to be hair mile heats, best 
two in three. 

Entries to stakes Nos. 7, 8, 9 aDd 10 close August 
1; entry fee $25. payable: $5 August 1; $5 Septem- 
ber 1; $5 October 1: $5 November 1, and $5 the 
evening before the race. 

Colts to bo eligible to colt stakes must have 
been owned and kept in the Territory of Arizona 
at least six months prior to December 1, 1905. 

Stalls free to entered horses during the meeting. 



Rules of the American Trotting Association to 
govern, except as otherwise provided 

Six to enter and four to start. 

Money divided 50. 25, 15 an^ 10 per cent. 

Stakes Nos 1. 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 to be mile heats, 
best three In Ave. 

No race longer than Ave heats. Money divided 
in accordance with summary at end of tiff. heat. 

Entrance fee to stakes Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and ti, 
five per cent, with five per cent additional from 
money winners. 

A horse distancing the field, or any part thereof, 
will be entitled to only one money. 

Oae horse may be entered In two classes, and be 
held for but one entry, unless two starts are made; 
and a horse may be declared out on or before 
November 1 by filing written notice with the 
Secretary, and payment of three per cent of the 
stake. 

Two horses may be entered in one class and be 
held only for the entry of the horse that starts; 
but if neither horse starts one entry fee will be 
required. 

Program will be arranged so a horse can start in two races during the week 
Phoenix has a new, modern $50,000 plant, with both mile and half-mile tracks. 
The finest climate in the world for winter and spring training. 
The best of water. Choicest alfalfa oat. wheat or barley hay $8 per ton. 
Special rates on horses over Santa Fe and Southern Paclfio roads. 
Horses unloaded at grounds over either road without change or delay. 
For entry blanks or further information, address 

W. N. TIFFANY, 

Secretary Arizona Fair Association, PHOENIX, ARIZONA. 

Free-for-AM Pace s fair e 

RE-OPENED 

$600 PURSE $600 

TO CLOSE TUESDAY, AUGUST I, 1905. 

The Free-for-All Pace offered by the California S'.ate Agricultural Society 
for the State Pair Meeting of 1905 having failed to fill the race is re opened for a 
purse of 8(500 , to close Tuesday, August 1, 190.), with the same conditions as races 
that closed July 10th. 
Cut this advertisement out, fill In blanks and mall to the undersigned. 

AL LINDLEY, Secretary, 

Sacramento. Cal. 

IN FREE-FOR-ALL PACE, PURSE 8600, 

I hereby enter 



Mrc 



Dam ........ 

Sire of Dam 

Owned by 

Entered by 

Dated at !2. .Uwi'p*fc 

Remember, Entries Close August 1, 1905. 




RED BALL BRAND. 



Awarded Gold Medal 
AtCallfornlaState 
Fair IHVSi. 

Every horse owner who 
values his stock should 
constantly have a sup- 
ply of It on hand. It 
improves and keeps 
stock In the pink of 
condition. 

rionhattan Pood Co 



1263 Folsoin St., San Francisco 
a Hk your grocers or dealers for it. 



Positively Cures Colic, Scouring and Indigestion. 

C. P. KEKTELL, Manager 



12 



[July 22, 1905 



Established Dairy Facts. 

Tea or fifteen years ago the agricultural 
paper* of the United Statee were actively 
engaged in discussing a number of mooted 
questions concerning the relation of the 
feed of cows to milk production. Prior to 
that time there was a very general con- 
viction among farmers that both the 
quality and quantity of the milk could 
be improved by feeding. 

The farmer who was selling milk for 
town consumption had the conviction 
that if lie fed his cows bran he would not 
only get a great deal more milk, but less 
rich in butter fat; in other words, that be 
could adulterate the butter fat with slop 
feed or bran mashes and get more money 
for it. He also believed that he could in- 
crease the butter fat by more concentrated 
food. 

When this was fully thrashed out, the 
conclusion reached was that while more 
abundant feeding up to the capacity of 
the cow would increase the quantity of 
milk, the per cent of butter fat in the 
milk was determined by the idiosyncrasy 
of the cow, and that this could not be in- 
creased provided thecow was fed a normal 
ration ; that is, if the cow was getting less 
feed, and feed of an inferior quality, and 
then was changed to a feed adapted to 
her, there would be an increase in her 
richness or butter fat in the milk, but 
beyond this point no increase was pos- 
sible. 

It was also discovered that there were 
changes in the percentage of butter fat in 
the milk from day to day for which no 
adequate reason could be discovered. 

The British investigators took this up, 
and from one of our foreign exchanges we 
quote their conclusions, which are quite 
in line with the conclusions of the investi- 
gators on this side : 

"That when a cow is in full milk and 
full tiesh she will give her normal quality 
of milk for at least a limited time, even 
though the quality and quantity of food 
be very deficient. 

"That when in good condition a cow 
will take off her body whatever is deficient 
in food in order to give her normal qual- 
ity of milk. 

"That an extra supply of nutritious 
food at all times increases the quantity of 
milk, but the percentage of fat is not in 
any way improved by it; If anything, the 
tendency being the other way. 

"That an extra supply of nutritious 
food almost invariably very slightly 
increases the solids not fat of the milk. 
That a ration poor in food ingredients has 
a very slight tendency to reduce the solids 
not fat in milk, but has little appreciable 
effect on the fat. 

"That with a poor ration a cow in full 
milk will lose carcass weight, while on 
a rich diet she will gain weight. 

"That although the percentage of fat 
in a cow's milk may vary daily we at 
present seem unable to control these 
variations or to account for them. 

"That for limited periods up to one 
month or thereabouts, all ordinary quanti- 
ties and qualities of foods seem to have 
no material effeet on the quality of the 
milk. 

"That some feeds exercise a material 
effect in raising the melting point of 
butter. 

'That the aim of all producers of milk, 
butter and cheese should be to feed what 
will give quantity in moderate amount 
and of a mixed nature, and then the 
produce will be the best that cow can 
give. 

"That extra quality must be looked for 
by improving the breeds and judicious 
selection rather than by any special foods 
or methods of feeding. 

"That the variations in the percentage 
of fat in a cow's milk are caused by some- 
thing, but what that something is we at 
present do not know, though if we did we 
might be able to influence the q u 
Exchange 

If you would create something j i u 
must be something. 



California Cattle fir Australia. 



The repeal of the quarantine against 
American bred cattle and sheep, which 
has closed the ports of Australia to 
breeders and stockmen of this country, 
has resulted in a prompt and gratifying 
demand from the Australian ranchers 
for American stock. 

C. E. Binnie, of Sydney, Australia, 
arrived in this city yesterday in com- 
pany with J. H. Hoyt, sheep inspector 
of Solano county. Yesterday they 
visited the ranch of Henry Glide, south 
of this city, to arrange for the purchase 
of a number of registered French merino 
sheep to be used for breeding pur- 
poses in Australia. Mr. Binnie stated 
that the owners of finer stock were 
aggrieved at the action of the Govern- 
ment, since the superior value of the 
French merinosheep has been recognized 
ever since the first exportation from the 
Glide ranch. This was several years 
ago when Jas. F. Roberts, a rancher of 
Livermore, returned to Australia, tak- 
ing with him a half dozen of the finest 
animals bred in this oountry. Mr. Bin- 
nie, it was stated, is also arranging for 
heavy purchases of registered cattle 
and will take to Australia the first 
steam harvester ever used on the island 
continent. 

It is but a short time since Mr. Glide 
exported to South Africa sixty head of 
theep which were purchased at Cape- 
town by the agent for General Cronje, 
one of the war heroes, who has aban- 
doned the sword for the sickle, and is 
engaged in cattle raising on a large scale. 
Mr. Glide recently received a letter In 
the hand writing of General Cronje, ex- 
pressing satisfaction with the results 
obtained. 

Another large shipment will be made 
to Honolulu next week. Mr. Glide ex- 
ports five hundred head of sheep annually 
to France, England, Germany, Africa 
and Australia. —Sacramento Union. 



Age to Castrate Lambs. 



In a recent article on the subject of 
castration of lambs, it was advised that 
the operation be performed when lambs 
are fifteen days old. This advice was 
based upon an extensive experience with 
the operation, but we have nothing to say 
against castrating lambs at five days old, 
provided those folio • ing the practice 
have good success. We have preferred 
fifteen days as the best time, thinking 
the lambs by that time would have be- 
come strong, in good health, over the 
troubles sometimes experienced from the 
first milk of the dam, and less liable to 
quit sucking hh a result of the operation. 
In many instances lambs at five days old 
are weakly beaetiee not in a fit state to 
withstand shock <f castration, • o that it 
is better to wait until they gather strength 
and are thriving nicely. This is specially 
true when ewes have had a hard winter 
upon incomplete rations of hay and fod- 
der without grain, When ewes are well 
fed and have thriven well during the 
winter, their lambs would be better able 
to stand the early operation. It is ap- 
parent, therefore, that good judgment 
should be used in deciding when to cas- 
trate, and we should always wait for good 
weather even were lambs to go longer 
than fifteen days uncut. — A. S. Alexander, 
V. S. 

There seems to be an animal magnetism 
between men and cows which makes one 
milker more acceptable than another. It 
is unnecessary to say that it is unprofita- 
ble for anyone to attempt the care of cows 
who dislikes such work. There is such a 
thing as incompatibility of disposition 
between a cow and her keeper, which 
must be respected. 

o 

One advantage in spreading fine ma- 
nure is that the coarse is much more 
injurious, if the season turns off dry. 
o 

Sponges. S. Adderley, 307 Market St 



The Crowley Stake No.2 

A SIDE STAKE FOR STARTERS IN 
THE THREE YEAR-OLD DIVISIONS 



-OF THE- 



Pacific Breeders Futurity Stakes No. 5 

(FOALS OF 1905-TO TAKE PLACE IN 1908) 

Entries to Close Tuesday, August I, '05 

CONDITIONS. 

„^ A ?, 1 , de . St . a . ke .°v. fi ^ each J 0rT ^ t i n , B . a ? d Paolng Foals of 1905 that were entered or substituted 
and will start In the Three- Year-Old Divisions of the Breeders Futurity In 1908. All money paid In 
on trotting foals to be divided among those starting In the trotting division, and all money paid In 
on pacers to bsdlvlded among those that start In the pacing division. Moneys divided 75 and 25 per 
cent and to go to the first and seoond horses in this side stake, according to their positions In the 
final summary of each race. In oase all those In the side stake should be distanced in the first heat 
of either of th ; regular events, they shall start In another race best two heats In three, on the same 
day, to deolde the monoy winners. Entrance to the side stake $25 eaoh. The money to be deposited 
in some reputable bank, to remain at interest until the stake Is trotted. 

Entries Close Tuesday, August 1st. with F W. KELLEy, Secretary P. C. T. H. B. A. 

3G Geary St , San Francisco. 



AUCTION SALE. 

35 head of High-class Driving Horses 35 

of which 25 are from the Oooidental Land and Improvement Co., Sharon, 
Gal., and are by Teheran 2:24 and Waterford out of high-class mares. 
Also 10 head consigned by C. E. Needham, Bellota, Cal., by 
such splendid stallions as Guy McKinney, Charles Derby. 
Directed, etc., out of well-bred mares. Sale takes place 



1 QH S AT EIGHT 
-L C7W — O'CLOCK 



MONDAY EVENING. JULY 24, 

Horses at yard July 22d Send for Catalogue 

FRED H, CHASE & CO. Live Stock Auctioneers, 

1732 Market St., near Van Ness Ave., S. F., Cal. 




In Unnfnnlinn T i ni rr. « b 4 Th e Greatest Rem- 
edy liver Known 
For Bad Legs. 

It penetrates to the seat of trouble at once. It allays fever from any 
cause. A Safe, Speedy and Positive Cure for Hpllnta, Curbs. Thorough- 
pin', Sweeny. Capped Hocks, Wind Puffs and all Lameness from 
Sprains. Ringbone and other bony enlargements. On broken down, weak 
and Injured tendons, ruptured ligaments its power is unfailing. Perma- 
nently cures all broken down conditions of the Ankles, Hocks, Tendons 
or Ligaments, without loss of hair or an hour's let up on the h rse. 

PRICK »8 pek liiiTTLE Express charges prepaid on reoelpt of 
price. Every bottle guaranteed to give satisfaction or money refunded. 

THE F. A. WILCOXSON REMEDY CO , Tiffin O., C 8. A. 



PALACE HOTEL, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 



5 



TOURISTS and TRAVELERS will, now, with difficulty reoognUe the famous COURT 
into which for twenty-fl e years carriages have driven. This spaoe of over a quarter 
of an acre has recently, by the addition of very handsome furniture, rugs, ohandellera 
and tropical plants, been converted Into a lounging room— the FINEST IN THE 
WORLD. 

The EMPIRE PARLOR— the PALM ROOM, furnished In Cerise, with Billiard and 
Pool tables for the ladles— the LOUIS XV PARLOR the LADIES WRITING ROOM 
and numerous other modern Improvements, together with the unexcelled Cuisine and the 
Most Convenient Location in the City— all add much to the ever Increasing popularity 
of this most famous HOTEL. 



phone park 168 A. J. MARTIN, Prop. 

HULDA STABLES 

BOARDING AND LIVERY 

1530 Jb'JbJTiTi STRE13T 

BEST OF ACCOMMODATIONS. 



CALL AND SEE FOR YOURSELF. 



BET. LYON AND CENTRL AVE. 

Hayes St Cars Pass the Door 



Ross McMahon 

Truck, Wagon and Horse Covers, Camp Furniture, etc. 

OOODWO R K,PHOHPT8™, ushB8) 35 ^R^T JJ S AN FRANCISCO 



REASONABLE PRICES 



CRAFT'S DISTEMPER CURE 

FOR HORSES. SHEEP AND DOGS 

Prevents and cures distemper, influenza, coughs, pinkeye, catarrhal fever, 
shipping fever and all germ diseases of domestic animals. In use for twenty 
years Fully 90% of all breeders, shippers and trainers use Craft's Cure. 
Beware of imitations. Ask for Craft's. Be sure you get Craft's. Use do 
other Price SOo and SI a bottle. Large size cheaper. At dealers, or dlreot 
prepaid. Write for free booklet. 

o«rmoio K i.u 1 3 3d st, Lafayette, Ind. 

D E. NEWELL, General Agent for Pacific Coast 619 Mission St., San Franrlsco. Cal 




Wells Medicine Co, q 



P<aH i 0*f f»£»c T*l hula acd typewritten ready for framing; 

rcui^icw 1 auuiaicu Write for p r i Cet . breeder and 

Sportsman, 36 Geary Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



July 22, 1906] 



18 



Water for Work "Animals. 



Kamember that the stomach of the 
horse is small hence it should have fre- 
quent drinks of water in the day and 
especially in summer. Not only this, but 
the water should be fresh and cool and 
given from a clean receptacle. During 
the day, between meal, there is no reason 
why the horse should not have all the 
water it wants, provided it is doing only 
ordinary hard work. 

There are other places for water also; 
when the horse comes in from the field 
remove the halter and head gear and 
with a large sponge go over the entire 
head and shoulders with the water, re- 
moving all the soil and prespiration ; let 
the water be used freely about the ears, 
the nostrils and in the mouth. Then go 
over the rest of the body and wipe it 
thoroughly with the wet sponge. This 
sort of treatment will do the animal a 
world of good and it will eat better, sleep 
better and work better for this humane 
treatment. 

In warm weather look out for tender 
spots on the horse where the harness 
chafes ; be watchful that the harness fits 
in every part so that the work may be 
done without flinching. If the collar does 
not fit see that it is attended to at once 
for the harness maker'6 bill will be less 
than the value of the services of the 
horse if it is laid up for a week with a 
sore shoulder. Don't forget the nightly 
grooming and see that it is thoroughly 
done. 

A Cream Cooling Device. 



Now that the hot season is approach- 
ing, I desire to call attention of butter 
makers to the bad practice of putting ice 
into the cream for cooling purposes. If 
you will just allow some ice to melt in a 
pail, and notice the impurities left in the 
water, you will know why 1 say "bad 
practice." But the cream must be cooled 
and yo-i are not so fixed that you can ice 
the water around the cream vat suf- 
ficently to lower the temperature of the 
cream quite enough, and consequently 
you think that you are rather compelled 
to put ice into your cream. You are 
really not compelled to do any such 
thing. If you cannot cool your cream by 
icing the water outside the cream vat, 
try this plan: 

Take two or three long pails— "shotgun 
cans" are the be9t. Clean them thor- 
oughly on both outside and inside, fill 
them full of crushed ice and set them 
into the cream. Try this plan. I be 
lieve you will like it better than putting 
ice into the body of the cream. — Creamery 
Journal 



O. F. WILLEY CO. 

(Established 1855) 

Carriage Builders and Dealers 
Harness, Robes and Whips. 

AGENTS FOR 

Brewster & Co . New York, of Broome 8t. 
KauiTuian Buggy Co, Mlu nilsburg, Ohio 
C. S. CafTrey Co , Camden, N. J 
Connersville Burgy Co , Connersvllle Ind. 
Watertown Carriage Co.. Watertown. N. Y 
Walborn AKlkerPony Vehicles, St Paris, O. 

23-27 Hayes and 1622-28 Market St. 

(Under St. Nicholas Hotel) 
Phone South 1062 SAN FRANCISCO 



Deposit Tour 
Idle Funds 



FOR SALE. 
"A STRATH WAY" 

A Dapple Gray Gelding by Strathway out 
of a Thoroughbred Mare. 

MR FRISCO Is 8 years old and SOUND; 
weighs 1050 lbs. He Is one of the grandest roaa 
horses In America today. Fearless of all objects 
on road; a very fast walker; does not pull or lug 
on the bit; oarrles his head high; goes st.alght 
and never stumbles; will stand when tied and 
there Is no road too long for him He Is a good 
feeler and a good looker at all times, either be- 
fore or after driving. His speed qualities are 
phenomenal He never saw a race track until 
last spring, when he was sent to Mr. Al McDonald 
at the track at Pleasanton. who drove htm a mile 
In 222H, last half In 1:08!4. with only thirty 
days' training Mr. McDonald says he will trot 
a mile in 2:15 with three months' handling. The 
owner of this horse has to go East and has Iff t 
the horse, buggy and harness in charge of Mr. 
Thomas Kinney at the Fashion Stables, who will 
show the horse or outfit. 

THOMAS KINNEY, 
Fashion Stables, Ellis St., S. F. 



HIGH GLASS STALLION FOR SALE. 

GREAT PETER FIVE YEARS OLD 
Sire Peter the Great 2:07x by Pilot Medium. 
Flr»'t dam, Juanlta 2:29 (dam of Slnaloa 2:25J£) 

by Sultan, sire of Stamboul 2:07%, etc. 
Second dam, Beulah (dam of Beuzetta 2:06%, 
Early Bird 2:10 and four more in the list) by 
Harold, sire of Maud S. t:0H% etc 
Third dam, Sally B. (dam of Maurlne 2:13J< and 
two more in the list) by Lever, thoroughbred 
son of the great race horse Lexington. 
Okkat Pstbr Is a beautiful bay, 15.1 to 15. \Y t 
hands high and one of the handsomest horses In 
California He trotted a mile in 3-21 and half In 
107 as a three-year-old. He was put to pacing 
with the straps this year, and in a few weeks 
paoed a mile In 2:11*4 at Los Angeles, with a 
quarter right at 30 seconds. He was then letup 
on as he had an attaok of distemper. Is sound 
and all right now, and can probably show a mile 
In 2:1* to an Intending purchaser. Will sell at a 
reasonable prioe or will deal with him in trade 
for a flrst-olass trotter. Address 

ROBT. A. SMITH, 
2124 Park Grovo'Avenue, Los Angeles, Cal, 



Daedalion 2:10 For Sale. 

Can Beat His Record Three Times 
In a Race. 

Is entered at Fresno and ready to start. 
A high-class Raoe Horse and a Coming Sire. 

Sire, DIABLO 2:09 1-4. 

Dam GRACE (dam of Daedalion 

2:10, Creole 2:15, Eagle 2:19$, etc.) 

by Buccaneer. 

Owner's business will not permit him to devote 
any time to racing. For further particulars 
address 

BREEDER AND SPORT8MAN. 



A GOOD FILLY FOR SALE. 

fTANDSOME TWO-YEAR-OLD FILLY BY 
-CI Lochinvar 2:20, he by Director H. 2:27 by 
Dlrector2:17; first dam Myrtle by Sterling 6223; 
seoond dam Theresa by Prompter; third dam 
Empress by Flaxtall; fourth dam Lady Narley 
by Marion, son of Mambrlno Chief 11. This Ally 
is well broken, perfectly sound, good gaited and 
a first-class prospect. For further particulars 
address J. D BLAMEY, 

Box 715, Grass Valley, Cal. 



o 1 



LIVERY FOR SALE. 

NB OF THE FINEST STABLES IN THE 
State. Has been established for years and Is 
doing a good paying livery and boarding stable 
business Located in one of the most prosperous 
cities in California. A first class proposition In 
every respect. Thorough investigation before 
purchasing solicited. Will be sold for 75% of its 
value Excellent reason for selling. For further 
particulars call or address "Livery," Breeder 
and Sportsman, San Francisco, Cal 



PARK HORSE FOR SALE. 

HIGH-CLASS ROADSTER, COAL BLACK 
15H hands, five years old, weighs 1000 pounds 
Is a very handsome horse, a perfect beauty: fear- 
less of all things on the road: has been driven by 
a lady. Has lots of speed, but never trained on a 
track. Sound and all right. Sire and dam both 
registered. Apply to 

E. A. GRIGSBY, Napa, Cal. 



California Safe Deposit 
and Trust Company 



Receives Savings Deposits of 
Ten Dollars and Upwards 



IT PAYS INTEREST 



TWICE A YEAR 



Rate- 
SJ^ per cent on ordinary aooounts 
3 6-10 per cent on term accounts 



CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $1 ,500,399- 46 

TOTAL ASSETS 7,665,839.38 



Deposits may be made by P. O. Order, 
Wells-Fargo Money Order or Bank Draft 
Send for Pamphlets Descriptive of Our 
Business 



OFFICES 

Cor California and Montgomery Sis. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



(572-B80 11th Ave. 
Back of The Chutes. 



All kinds of Horses 
bought and sold 



THE ZIBBELL STABLE 

Z1BBELL & SON, Proprietor!. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Boarding, Training and Handling all kinds of 
Fancy Horses. A few Nice Rigs on hand. Take 
any car going to the Chutes. Tel.: West 259. 



Photo Engraving Company 

HIGH CLASS ART 
IN 

Half Tones and Line Engraving 

Artistic Designing. 
606 Mission St., cor First, San Francisco 



WITH THE 



Central Trust Company 
of California 

42 Montgomery St. 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



You can open a Savings Account 
by mail with any sum 
large or small. 

INTEREST PAID SEMI-ANNUALLY 

3 1-4% on Ordinary Savings 
3 6-10% on Term Savings 

Send for Booklet, 
"THE SURE WAY TO WEALTH." 



CALIFORNIA 

NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY 

Through Picturesque California, 

The Ideal Route for 

The Aoeier aad Onting Trios 

One day's ride from San Franotsoo will take 
you to some of the finest Trout Streams In the 
State. Along the line and within easy distance 
are many of the best Springs and Summer Resorts 
In the State. The Company maintains a Fish 
Hatchery and annually stooks the many streams 
reached by Its road One million Trout Fry were 
planted last year In these streams. 

Black Bass Fishing can be enjoyed in Russian 
River near Guerneville, Ouernewood Park and 
Camp Vacation, In season. 

The best Striped Bass Fishing waters on the 
Coast reached by the Tlburon Ferry. 

VACATION FOR 1905 

Issued annually by the Company, Is now ready. 
This is the standard publication on the Coast for 
information regarding Mineral Springs, Resorts, 
Country Homes and Farms where summer board- 
ers are taken, and Solect Camping Spots. 

Beautifully Illustrated, 150 pp. and can be had 
In response to mail request or at tloket offices. 

Ticket Offices— 650 Market Street (Chronlole 
Bldg) and Tlburon Ferry, foot of Market Street. 

General Office— Mutual Life Ins Bldg., oor. 
Sansome and California Sts., San Francisco. 



JA8. L. FRAZIER, 
Gen. Mgr. 



fAt the g| 
Tongues End H 

STOCK GET JUS1 ENOUGH AT THE RIGHT TIME. 

COMPRESSED PURE-SALT BRICKS. 
AND PATENT FEEDERS. 

No wdste.no neglect all convenience 

Your dealer hds it. Write us for the booh. 

BELMONT STABLE SUPPLY CO. 

PATENTEES MANUFACTURERS 

Broohlyn, N.Y. 



BUSINESS COLLEGE 
24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



The oldest, the largest, the most popular com- 
norolal school on the Pacific Coast. 30,000 gradu- 
ates; 80 teachers; 70 typewriters; over 900 student* 
annually placed hi positions. Send for catalogue. 



K. P. HEALD, President. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

IMPROVED 



(POCKET SIZE) 

100 Pages. Price $1, postpaid. 

5flWaY"iiirY v *^— - ■ ^^a,-^ Hgjj 

Most Complete Book 
of the kind published. 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

36 Geary St., San Francisco. 




COCOANUT OIL CAKE 

THE BEST FEED FOR 

STOCK, CHICKENS AND PIUS 

FOB 8 ALB IN LOTS TO SUIT BT 

EL DORADO LINSEED OIL WORKS CO. 
208 California Street, Han Francisco, Cal 




R. X. RYAN, 
Gen. Pass. Art. 



S0DIQTJE 



AWARDED 

^TATlcrANTISEPTIC ANO DISINFECT*?] 

IIANCB g ttyffi ffg * wH / TE " 

s- — phi lad elf 

■■gEjj^g.M en-d by Hanci 



CUTS, BURNS 
and SORES. 

THE BEST 
Antiseptic 

Dressing 

for 

Man or Beast. 



Keep handy for emer- 
gencies in home 
and stable. 

Equally good for dogs 
and all animals. 

If not at your drug- 
gists, small size sent 
to any address upon 
receipt of 10c. 



HANCE BROTHERS & WHITE 

Pharmaceutical Chemists 
PHILADELPHIA CHICAGO 



A BAD HITTER. 

His Bunches and Bruises can bo re- 
moved iiiiickly without stopping 
work with 

Absorbine 

This remedy cures Lameness, kills 
Pain, ltemoves auy Soft Iluneli with- 
out blistering or removing the hair, 

and pleasant to use. jjt.'.OO per 
bottle, delivered, or at dealer's 
ABSORBINE. JR., for mankind, £1.00 Bottlo! 
Allays inflammation rapidly. Cures strains. 

W. F. TOCNU, P. D. F., 
64 Monmouth Street. Springfield, Mass. 

For sale by Maok&Co Laogiey & Michaels Co. 
endlngton & Co.. J. O'Kane and J. A. MoKerron, 
all of San Franotsoo. 




TRAINING AND BOARDING STABLES 

DEVISADERO AND FULTON STREETS. 

(1308 Fulton Street) 

Business Horses For Hire. 

I have opened a new Boarding and Training 
Stable near the abovo corner, and will board and 
train for racing, road use or matinee driving a 
limited number of first-class horses at reasonable 
rates. Have good looatlon, brand-new stable and 
everything flrst-olass. All horses In my oare will 
receive the best of attention. 

T. C. CABNEY. 
Telephone: Page 4147. 




14: 



IJULY 22, 190 




THE BAYWOOD STUD 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAL. 

(Property of John Parrott, Esq.) 
Devoted Exclusively to the Breeding and Training of 

High Stepping 
Hackney Bred 
Harness Horses 



WALTER SEALY, Manager. 




Take It In Time, 

g If you have the remedy on bond, and are ready to 
aqt promptly, you will find that there is nothing; in 
the form of Spavins, Splints. Curbs. Windpuffs nnd 
Bunches which will not yield promptly and perma- 
nently to 

Qu inn's Ointment 



It In 



'd thousands or pood horses from the |h-<1<11^ : 
le broken-down hoi>e market. Mr. C. It Die 
I ens. of Minneapolis. Minn.. * ho conducts one of the largest livery stables in the North we 
I writes h» follow*: I have been ubImk Qu inn's Olntm«nl lor Bome'tiine and with the treat! 
I success. I take pleasure In reconimemlinir it to my ii j etuis. No horseman should be wit 
| out It In his stable. For curbs, splints, spavins. windpufTs and all buncheK it has no equal 

Price $1 .00 per bottle. Bold by all llnggJm or sent by mail. Write us for circulars* 
I testimonials, etc. Sent 
free for the asking. 



IV. B. Eddy & Co., Whitehall, N. Y. 



HIGHLAND 



(TRIAL 2:12) 

Bred at Highland Stock 
Farm, Dubuque, Iowa, 



Expresso 2919S \ 

half brother to 
Expressive (3) fcUM 

I 



Will make the Season of 1905 to a limited number of approved 
_ mares at the farm of Mr. C. VV. Clark, 

SAN MATEO, CAL. 

Terms for the Season $25 

HIGHLAND Is a grand looking young stallion, six years old His breeding Is 
most fashionable and his immsdiate anoestors are producers of race wieners with 
fast records. He is beautifully galted and has a perfect disposition. Djes not 
pull or want to brauk at speed, and oan be placed at will in a bunch of horses. He 
is a high olass horse and has better than 2:10 speed. As he is to be bred to his 
owner's man's this year and specially prepared for a low record this fall, his owner 
desires that he be bred to a few high-class outside mares this season. 

HIGHLAND Is a coal blaok horse with one white hind ankle, stands 16 hands 
high and weighs close to 1200 pounds. 

A few mares at $35 each will also be received to be bred to 

KINNEY WILKES 

champion. KINNEY WILKES is hardly broken yet, but has shown 2:30 speed 
this year with the view of racing him next season. 

For further particulars regarding above Stallions apply 10 or address 



Alpha 2:23^ \ 

Dam of 
Aegon 2:18!* (sire Aegon | 
Star 2:11m): Algy 2:19*; I 
Aeolion 2:20 sire of 
Wedgenut 2:26*: Lady 
Acacia, dam of Precursor 
2:20V4: Erst, dam of 
Walno2:29* 



r 

Advertiser 2:15v<.. \ 
Sire or . I 

Mlthra ?:!4i< 1 

Adaria 2:I«M 

Adbell ... 2:23 
World's cham- 
pion yearling , 

Esther J 

Dam of 

Expressive 

(3, 2i2H 

Express. ...2:21 

Kelly 2:27 

Alcantara 2:23 . . . 
Sire of 
Sir Alcanta'a... 

2:05* 

Moth Miller 2:07 
Sufreet . . . 2:06* [ 
Jej>ste Pepper 
Dam 
lone 

Alpha 2:S3J4 

3 producing sons 
7 " daughters 



>per J 

of 

.. .2:17'/, I 



Eler.tloDePr 
16ft in 2:30 



Lola Wilkes 
dam of 3 In list 



Express 

(thor.) 
Collsseum 

(thor.) 

Geo Wilkes 2:22 
83 in 2:30 

Alma Mater 
dam of 8 in 2:30 

Mamb Chief II 
sire of 6 In 2:30 

Dau.Sidi Hamel 



FOUR-YEAR-OLD BAY STALLION BY McKINNEY 

2:ll!i, champion sire of the world; 
Dam, HAZEL WILKES 2:11* bv Guy Wilkes 2:15*: 
second dam. Blanche (dam of 5 In the list) by 
Arthurton; third d%m. Nancy by Gen. Tavlor. 30-mlle 
He Is 15 2 hands and weighs »bout 1050 p >unds. He will be worked 



W. A. CLARK jr., Owner. 
TED HAYES, Manager. 



D. W. DONNELLY, Agent, 

San Mateo, Cal. 



cMURRAY 



POINTS: 

Perfect Construction, 
Light Weights, 
Great Strength, 
Easy Running, 
And LOW PRICES, 

McMURRAY SULKIES 

and JOGGING C\RTS 

STANDARD THE WORLD OVER 

49~Address, for printed matter and prices 

W. J. KENNEY 

631 Valencia St., San Francisco, Cal. 



THE HOME OF 



McKINNEY, 8818, 2:11% 

The unprecedented World's Leading Sire of Extreme Race 
Horse Speed. Fee, $300 until May 1 Oth, after which no 
bookings will be accepted for less than the advanced fee of $500. 



Prince Favorite, 38076, 

TRIAL (3) 2:21; HALF IN 1:09; QUARTER IN :34. 

Son of The Beau Ideal, 2: 1 b%, and Princess Chimes dam of 
Lady of the Manor, 2:04%. :::::::::::: 

This National Horse Show Prize Winner is conceded by many to be 
prospectively the finest stallion ever bred at Village Farm. Fee, $ 1 00. 



TOOMBY 

TWO WHEELERS 

ARE THE LEADERS. 

Sulkies in Ail Sizes. 

Pneumatic 
Road and Track Carts. 



for Team Work on b:>th Road 
and Track. 

High Wheel Jog Carts, 
Long Shift Breaking Carts. 

Send for latest Catalogue to 



Fees are invariably payable before mares leave the farm. No 
return privilege, but fees returned if mare fails to have a colt. 
Keep, $2. per week. Our terms are rigidly adhered to in all 
cases and we cannot accept any deviation from them. : : : 



Kindly mention this journal 
when writing and address 



The Empire City Farms, 



CUBA 
N. Y. 



75 PER CENT 



OF ALL MORSE OWNERS 
AND TRAINERS 



USE AND RECOMMEND 

GampbeirsHorseFootRemedy 

SOLD BY 

SAYRE & SON Sacramento, Cal 

R. T. FRAZIER Pueblo, Colo 

J G. READ & BRO Ogden, Utah 

JUBINVILLE & NANCE Butte, Mont 

A. A. KRAFT CO SpokaDe, Wash 

A. F. HOSKA HARNESS CO Tacoma, Wash 

McSORLEY & HENDERSON.... Seattle, Wasb 

C. RODDER StocktoD, Cal 

WM. E. DETELS PleasantoD, Cal 

W. C. TOPPING San Diego, Cal 

JEPSEN SADDLERY CO Lo 8 Angeles, Cal 

H. THORWALDSON Fresno, Cal 

JOS. McTIGOE San Francisco, Cal 

BRYDON BROS. HARNESS MFG CO 

Los Angeles, Cal 

JAS. B. CAJ1PBELL &CO.. Manufacturers, 4 12 W.fladison St., CHICAGO ,ILL 





Cut=Under Truck 



This Truck is the result of years of endeavor to produce a wagon that has great 
carrying capacity, ample strength without superfluous weight, low 
enough to the ground to minimize the labor of loading. 
Can turn short among trees, and can be used on 
the roads as well as on the farm. 
The "Jersey" Is a pronounced success, not only for tbe transportation of fruit, 
but as a general purpose dray in villages and small cities. 

HOOKER dfe OO- 



V1CTOK VERILHAC 

Proprietor 
JAMES M. McGBATII 

Manager 



16-18 DRUMM ST., SAN FRANCISCC 

DEXTER PRINCE STABLES 

TRAINING, BOARDING AND SALE 

Cor. of Grove and Baker Streets, jast at the Panhandle Entrance to Uolden Oate ParU 

(Take Hayes, McAllister or Devlsadero Street Cars) 

Best located and healthiest Stable in San Francisco Always a good roadster on hand for 
sale Careful and experienced men to care for and exercise park roadsters and prepare horses for 
track use. Ladies can go and return to stable d not have their horses frightened by automobiles 
or cars. 



Pp>H.O«IV»P>C T«hlll«tpH and type written ready for framing 
rCUI^ICCS I dUUlalCU Write for prices. Breeder and 
SPORTSMAN, 36 Geary Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



July 22, 1905 1 



15 



THE CONSOLATION HANDICAP 



Held at Iodlauapolis, June 27-30, 1935. was won by Mr. Jas. T. Atkinson of Newcastle, Pa , score 99 out of 100 from the 18 yard mark, using 

PETERS FACTORY LOADED SHELLS 

Thin was the Only Event Oil ring the Kntlre (.rand American which was won from Krhlnd the 
1G yard Line. Many other Notable Scotch were mtd« wlih I'etcrH Shells, among: them the following: 

1 it on Practice Day. F. M See (tie). 99 < ui of 100 1st on First Day. L H Reld (tie). 99 out of 100. 2d In Preliminary, Wm Veach (tie), 97 out of 100. 3d In Grand American, M Arte (tie), 97 out of 100. 

Ia the Cjnsolatlon Handicap, 2 scores of 98, 5 of 97 ■) of 06 and 25 others above 90 were made wllh Peters Shells 

All of which merely goes to prove that Peters Shells are WINNERS. 

THE PETERS CARTRIDGE CO., Cincinnati, Ohio 



New York: 93 Chambers Street. T. H. KELLER, Manager. 





NEW MODEL 
AUTOMATIC 
EJECTOR 



. 4 Lin. $100 




We Make 16 Oracles, $17 75 to $300. 



Write for ART CATALOG to 



THE ITHACA GUN CO., Ithaca, N. Y. 

£ Coast Branch, PHIL B. BEKEART CO., 114 Second St., San Francisco 



SHREVE & BARBER CO. 



PIONEER DEALERS 



739 
Market St. 

CO 

Send for 
cataloiue 




521 
Kearny St. 

Mailorders 
a Specialty 



GUVS, AMMUNITION, FISHING jTACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS 



SAN FRANCISCO, 



CALIFORNIA. 



NOTHING 




Too 

Good 
for YOU 



When It comes to your Gun, tin? Rest l» N ONE TOO <;<>OI) and 
cheapest In the end. If you do not know why the PARKER Is the 
Rest linn you can buy and the only can you should Invest In, write 
us to-day and we will tell you all about THE Oun. 



32 Warren St., New York City. 



30 Cherry St., Meriden, Conn. 



419 STRAIGHT! 

"Billy" Crosby with his SMITH 
GUN makes another world's rec- 
ord. You can't miss 'em with a 
Smith Automatic Ejector fitted with 
the Hunter One-Trigger. 

Send for Catalogue. 

HUNTER ARMS CO., Fulton, N. Y. 



Ballistite Wins! 

Both the High Amateur and General Average 

A NO ALSO THE 

Phil P. Bekeart Challenge Trophy-100 Birds- 

At the Second Annual Tournament of the Pacific Coast Trap 
Shooters Association, Ingleside, May 28, 29, 30, were won with 



If You Have Not Yet Tried It, Do So. You Will Like It. 

BAKER & HAMILTON 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS 
SAN FRANCISCO SACRAMENTO 



BREEDERS' DIRECTORY. 

"HOWARD SHORTHORNS' — QUINTO 
HEKD-77 premiums. California State Fairs 
1902-3-4. Registered cattle of beet and milking 
families for sale. Write us what you want. 
Howard Cattle Co , 206 Sansome Street, San 
Francisco. 



PETER 3AXE & SON, Lick House, S. F..Cal. 
Importers, Breeders and Dealers for past 30 years. 
All varieties Cattle, Horses, Sheep, Hogs. High- 
class breeding stock. Correspondence solicited. 



HOLSTEI NS — BUTTER BRED FAMILIES. 
Work herd; 90% winners at State and county fairs, 
show ring, and every butter conteat since 1885 in 
California. No reservations. Stock near S. F. 
F. H. Burke, 30 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

JERSEYS, HOLSTEI N 8 AND DCRHAM8. 
Dairy Stock specially. Hogs, Poultry. Estab- 
lished 1876. William Niles & Co.. Irf>n Angeles 
Oal. 



VETERINARY. 



33 r . w m, 35*. Bgan. 

M. R. C. V. S., F. E. V. M. S. 

VETERINARY SURGEON. 

Member of the Royal College of Veterinar> 
Surgeons, England; Fellow of the Edlnbun 
Veterinary Medical Sooiety; Graduate of the New 
Veterinary College, Edinburgh; Veterinary Sur- 
geon to the S. F. Fire Department; Live Stock 
Inspector forNew Zealand and Australian Colonlei 
at the port of San Francisco; Professor of Equine 
Medicine, Veterinary Surgery, Veterinary Depart- 
ment University of California: Ex-President ot 
the California Siate Veterinary Medical Associa- 
tion; Veterinary Infirmary, Residence and Office, 
San Francisco Veterinary Hospital, 1117 Golden 
Gate Avenue, near WebBter St., San Francisco: 
Telephone Park 128. 



Chronic Bronchitis and Catarrh oi the Bladder 

Cured In 48 Honrs. 



CAPSULES 



f 



Superior to Onpalbn. Cnbeba or Injection 



PEDIGREES TABULATED 

And type written 
Ready for framing. 
Write for prices. 

Hheedeh and Sportshar, 88 Geary Street 
8an Francisco. Oal. 



AT STUIX^ 

Ch. CUBA OF KENWOOD 

(Qlenbeigh Jr.— Stella) 
CUBA JR. 

(Ch. Cuba of Kenwood- Florida) 
One of the highest class Field Trial winners In 
America. Seven wins In nine Trials before he 

was two years old. 

STOGKDALE KENNELS 

R. M. DODGE, Manager, 
Bakersfleld, Kern Co., 
Boarding. Pointer Puppies and well-broken 
Dogs for sale. 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 



Advertisements under this head one cent per word 
per insertion. Cash to accompany order. 



POINTERS 



I^OR SALE — THOROUGHBRED POINTERS, 
' six months old; yard broken; not gun shy. 
D. E. MARTIN, Livermore. 



COLLIES 



"T" REM EN DO US BARGAINS IN COLLIES. 
* Send In order and get the very best at bottom 
prloe. GLEN TANA COLLIE KENNELS, P. 
O. Boi 1907 Spokane. Wash. 



IRISH AND 8COTCH TEKRIERS. 



TRISH AND SCOTCH TERRIERS FOR SALE. 
x Scottie Puppies sired by Ch. Loyne Ruffian 
and Crimson Rambler Bast Irish stock on the 
Coast. Mrs. BRADLEY-DYNE, Saturna P.O.. 

B. C. 



T he Cocker Spaniel 

Its History, Points, 
Standard. Care, 
Training, Etc. 

PRICE, POSTPAID, 50 CENTS 

The instructions on Care, Training, etc., apply 
to other breeds us well as to Cockers, and It Is a 
useful book for the dr>g owner. Tells how tj 
teach them to perform tricks. 

FOR BALE I»Y THE 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 



-DEALERS IN- 



55-57-59-61 First Street, S. F. 
Telephone Main 109 

CALIFORNIA 



©to gveebsv axxt* gtptf rteman 



f July 22, 1905 



TELEPHONE* 

South 640 r 



in e Harness 




VRSE BOOTS 



GOOD 
MARKSMEN 

Pin Tnoir IF'aitla 




AMMUNITION 

All the World Knows It. 

WRITE FOR I LLU 3TRATE D CATALOG. 

PACIFIC coast depot: 

86-88 FIRST ST., S. F. 




GOOD 

REPUTATIONS 

r-o Daily Mndo 
with 

tfe/n/'/i&o/ ? 

SHOT G UNS 



There's a Reason Why. 

Write for Illustrated Catalog 

pacific coast depot: 



E. E. DRAKE, 



Manager 



TttNCHESm 



WERE AWARDED THE 



ONLY GRAND PRIZE 

BY THE SUPERIOR JURY AT THE ST. LOUIS EXPOSITION, 1904. 



""*V\ T * " 1 

General Average 

For the Tournament at Indianapolis 
won by 
W. R. Crosby 
with a score of 298 ex 300, using 

New E. C. Improved 



"Fred A. Stone Scaresorow Trophy' 
which was awarded the 
High Professional 
in the 

Grand American Handicap 
won by 
W. G. Hearne 
using 

"INFALLIBLE" Smokeless 

LAFLIN & RAND POWDER CO. 



C. P. W. BR ANDS. 

SMOKELESS SHOTGUN SHELLS. 

PATTERN 

PERFECTION 

INVINCIBLE 

Loaded with Any Standard Brand of 
Smokeless Powder. 

When ordering from your dealer mention OUR BRANDS 
and kind of Powder wanted. 

We guarantee our loading. 

California Powder Works 

Wells-Fargo Bldg„ 49 Second St 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



A Clean Sweep 

At Indianapolis. 

Preliminary Handicap. June 28th, 
R. R Barber of Paulllna. Iowa, 
Score 98 ex 100, using 

Du PONT SMOKELESS 

Grand American Handicap, June 28th, 
R R Birber of Paulllna, Iowa, 
Score 99 ex 100, using 

Du PONT SMOKELESS 

Consolation Handicap, June 30th, 
J. T. Atkinson of Newcastle, Pa.. 
Score 99 ex 100, using 

Du PONT SMOKELESS 

Do YOU use 

Du PONT SMOKELESS? 

State Team Shoot 

R. S. Rhoads, Columbus, Ohio 93 

D A. Upson. Cleveland, Ohio 96 

F. H. Snow; South Brooklyn, Ohio 97 

J. E. Orr, Newark Ohio 98 

F. D. Alkire, Wllliamsport, Ohio 93 

474 

An average of 94. 8%. 
All of these gentlemen used 

Du PONT SMOKELESS 



Clabrough, 



GUNS 
Gun Goods 



Golcher & Go, 

FISHING 




JVSend for Catalogue. 



Tackle 

538 MARKET STREET, S. F. 



These are the Brands of 

FACTORY . . . 
LOADED . . 

PACIFIC 

CHALLENGE 

SUPERIOR 

EXCELSIOR 



VOL. XLVII. No. 4. 
36 GEARY STREET. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 29, 1905. 



SUBSCRIPTION 
THREE DOLLARS A TEAR 




I J CTLY 29, 1906 



PHOENIX, ARIZONA 

$12,000 $12,000 

FIRST ARIZONA TERRITORIAL PAIR 

DECEMBER 4-9, 1905. 

(Under Control of the Territory) 

TROTTING AND PACING STAKES. 

No. 1—2:35 Class, trotting $1000 

No. 2— 2:22 Class, trotting 1000 

No. 3—2:10 Class, trotting 1000 

No. 4—2:30 Class, pacing 1000 

No. 5— 2:17 Class, pacing 1000 

[So. 6— Free=for-all, pacing 1000 

No. 7— Arizona Two=year=olds, trotting, entrance money added 200 
No. 8— Arizona Yearlings, trotting, entrance money added 200 
No. 9— Arizona Two=year=olds, pacing, entrance money added 200 
No. 10— Arizona Yearlings, pacing, entrance money ad ed 200 

S400 Purses will be opened Uter for 2:30, 2:85, 8:19, 3:15. Free-for-all, and Three- 
year-old Trotters; :i:*8, If**, 2:13, 2:09. and Three-year-old Pacers 
W1200 will >i«o be off tired for Rnnnlug Kacei to be announced later. 

— ™ ~~ ■"" ™ — "^^™ 
CONDITIONS GOVEKNINU HARNESS RACES. 



Entries to stakes Nos. 1.8, 3, 4, 5 and 6 close 
Wednesday, November 1: but entries may be 
made at any time prior to that date in any 
stake to which a horse Is eligible at the date of 
making entry, and no record obtained after 
clati-of making; entry will be a bar. Entry 
fees to stakes Nos. 1, 8. 3. 4 h and 6 payable: t\s 
at time of making entry; $15 November 1st. $8 
the evening before the race. 

Stakes Nos. 7 and 9 to be half-mile heats, best 
three in Ave. 

Stakes Nos. 8 and 10 to bs half mile heats, best 
two in three. 

Entries to stakesNos. 7. 8, 9 and lOclose August 
I; entry fee (85. payable: $5 August 1; $5 Septem- 
ber I; $5 October l! (5 November 1, and (5 the 
evening before the race. 

Colts to be eligible to colt stakes must have 
been owned and kept in the Territory of Arizona 
at least six months prior to December 1, 1905. 

Stalls free to entered horsesduring the meeting. 



.Rules of the Amarlcau Trotting Association to 
govern, except as otherwise provided 

Six to enter and four to start. 

Money divided 50 35, 15 an^ 10 per oent. 

Stakes Nos 1.2,3,4, 5 and 6 to be mile heats, 
best three In Ave. 

No race longer than Ave heats. Money divided 
in accordance with summary at end of Hftli heat. 

Entrance fee to stakes Nos. 1, 2, 3. 4, 5 and B, 
five per cent, with Sve per cent additional from 
money winners. 

A horse distancing the field, or any part thereof, 
will be entitled to only one money. 

One horse may be entered in two classes, and be 
held for but one entry, unless two starts are made; 
mid a horse may be declared out on or bofore 
November I" by tiling written notice with the 
Secretary, and payment of three per cent of the 
stake, . 

Two horses mBy be entered In one class and be 
held only for the entry of the horse that starts: 
but If neither horse starts one entry fee will be 
required. 

Program will be arranged so a horse can start In two races during the week 

Phoenix has a new, modern (50.000 plant, with both mile and half-mile tracks. 

The finest climate In the world for winter and spring training. 

The best of water. Choicest alfalfa oat. wheat or barley hay (8 per ton. 

Special rates on'horses over Santa Fe and Southern Pacific roads 

Horses unloaded at grounds over either road without change or delay. 

For entry blanks or further Information, address 

W. N. TIFFANY, 

Secretary Arizona Fair Association, PHOENIX. ARIZONA 

The Crowley Stake No,2 

A SIDE STAKE FOR STARTERS IN 
THE THREE YEAR-OLD DIVISIONS 



Pacific Breeders Futurity Stakes No. 5 

(FOALS OF 1905-TO TAKE PLACE IN 1908) 

Entries to Close Tuesday, August I, '05 

CONDITIONS. 

. A Side Stake of (85 each for Trotting and Pacing Foals of 1905 that were entered or substituted 
and will start In the Three-Year-Old Divisions of the Breeders Futurity In 1908. All money paid In 
on trotting foals to bo divided among those starting In the trotting division, and all money paid In 
op pacers to bj divided, amm? tbo-ie that start in the pacing division. Moneys divided 75 and 85 per 
cent and to go to the first aui second horses in this side stake, according to their positions In the 
On :i I summary of each race. In case all those In the side stake (.hould be distanced In the first beat 
of either of th • regular events, they shall start In another race best two heats In three, on the same 
day, to decide the money wlnne'S. Entranoe to the side stake (85 each. The money to be deposited 
In gome reputable bank, to remain at Interest until the stake is trotted. 

Entries Close Tuesdty, August 1st, with F W. KELLEY, Secretary P. C. T H. B. A. 

36 Geary St , San Francisco. 




The Greatest Rem- 
edy Ever Known 
For Had Legs. 



WilcoxsoD's Perfection Liuiment 

It penetrates to the seat of trouble at once. It allays fever from any 
cause. A Safe, Speedy and Positive Cure for Splints, Curbs. Thorough- 
pin-, Sweeny. Capped Hocks, Wind PnfTs and all Lameness from 
Sprains, Ringbone and other biny enlargements On broken down, weak 
and Injured tendons, ruptured ligaments its power is unfailing. Perma- 
nently cures all broken down condltionsof the* Ankles. Hocks. Tendon* 
or Llc»ment«. without loss of hair or an hour's let up on the h rue. 

PRICE »2 PEK BOTTLE Express charges prepaid on receipt of 
price. Every bottle guaranteed to give satisfaction or money refunded. 

THE F. A. WILCOXSON REMEDY CO , Tiffin O , U S. A. 



PALACE HOTEL, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 



5 



TOURISTS and TRAVELERS will, now, with difficulty recognize the famous COURT 
into which for tu-enty-fl e years carriages have driven. This spaoe of over a quarter 
of an acre has recently, by the addition of very handsome furniture, rugs, chandeliers 
and tropical plants, been converted Into a lounging room— the FINEST IN THE 
WORLD. 

The EMPIRE PARLOR— the PALM ROOM, furnished In Cerise, with Billiard and 
Pool tables for the ladles— the LOUIS XV PARLOR the LADIES WRITING ROOM 
and numerous other modern Improvements, together with the unexcelled Cuisine and the 
Most Convenient Location in the City— all add much to the ever increasing popularity 
of this most famous HOTEL. 



Free-for-AII Pace s /4 



E 



RE-OPENED 



$600 PURSE $600 
TO CLOSE TOESDAY, AUGUST I, 1905. 

The Free-for-All Pace offered by the California S*.ate Agricultural Society 
for the State Fair Meeting of 1905 having failed to fill the race ia re-opened for a 
purse of $600, to close Tuesday, August 1, 1905, with the same conditions as races 
that closed July 10th. 
Cut this advertisement out, fill in blanks and mall to the undersigned. 

AL LINDLEY, Secretary, 

Sacramento. Cal. 

IN FREE-FOR-ALL PACE, PURSE $600, 



I hereby elite* 
Sire 



Dam 

Sire of Dam 
Owned by.... 
Entered by.. 
Dated at 



Remember, Entries Close August 1, 1905. 




the Lightest Lnng-8bare 
Track Cart In the World. 



TOOMEY 

TWO WHEELERS 

ARE THE LEADERS. 

Sulkies in All Sizes. 

Pneumatic 
Road and Track Carts. 

Pneumatic Pole Carts 

for Team Work on both Road 
and Track. 

High Wheel Jog Carts, 

Long Shift Breaking Carts. 

Send for latest Catalogue to 

S. TOOMEY & CO. 

Canal Dover, Ohio, U. S. A. 

O'BRIEN & SONS 

COAST AGENTS 

Golden Gate Ave. & Polk St. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 




Cut=Under Truck 



This Truck Is the result of years of endeavor to produce a wagon that has great 
carrying capacity, ample strength without superfluous weight, low 
enough to the ground to minimize the labor of loading. 
Can turn short among trees, and can be used on 
the roads as well as on the farm. 
The "Jersey" is a pronounced success, not only for the transportation of fruit, 
but as a general purpose dray in villages and small cities. 



16-18 DEUMM ST., 



SAN FRANCISCC 



PHONE PARK 163 



A. J. MARTIN, Prop. 



BOARDING AND LIVERY 

1530 FELL STREET 



BEST OF ACCOMMODATIONS. 
CALL AND SEE FOR YOURSELF. 



BET. LYON AND CENTRL AVE. 

Hayes St Cars Pass the Door 



D^H i rrtV^C Tahlllntf^H acd t yP ewrltten ready for framing 
rCUIglCCa IdUUIdlCU Write for prices. Breeder and 

Sportsman, 36 Geary Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



July 29. 1905] 



3 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

F. W. KELLEY, PROPBIiTOB. 

Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

— orriCH— 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O BOX 2300. 
tbukphonb: Black 586. 



ermi-One Year »3. Six Months »1.75, Three Months HI 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money snould be sent by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
iddressed to F. W. Kellet, 38 Geary St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee 
of good faith. 



San Francisco, Saturday, July 29, 1905. 



A SMALL ADVERTISEMENT is often far reach- 
ing. Some weeks ago Mr. Topham of Milpitas, 
SantaClara county, used a small space in the Breeder 
and Sportsman to state the fact that his stallion 
Peralta was for sale. Within a few days after the 
piper containing the advertisement reached its read- 
ers in New Zealand (who are quite numerous, by the 
way), came a cablegram addressed to the proprietor 
of this journal asking the price on this horse. The 
owner was communicated with, the price ascertained 
and cabled to the enquirer, Mr. H. J. Taska of Christ- 
church, New Zealand. That gentleman immediately 
cabled that the price was satisfactory and that he 
would take the horse, the money for which was sent 
by the next mail. Peralta will leave San Francisco on 
the steamer Sonoma of the Oceanic line which is 
advertised to sail for Auckland and Sydney, August 
10th. Peralta is now at the Hulda Stables in this 
city and is a fane looking five-year-old stallion. His 
sire is that great producer of speed Nutwood Wilkes 
2:16$, sire of John A. McKerron 2:04|, TWal Wave 
2:09, Who Is It 2:iOJ, Stanton Wilkes 2:104 and many 
other fast ones, and his dam is Rose McKinney, 
daughter of the greatest of all &ires McKinney 2:11}, 
and the dam of that never beaten colt Almadeo, rec- 
ord 2:22^ as a two-year-old, winner of the PaciQc 
Breeders Futurity in 1903 and the Occident Stake in 
1904. Rose McKinney 's dam is Queen Bee by Forest 
Clay 1934, next dam Lovelia by Almont Lightning 
1023, sire of the dam of Zombro 2:11, and next dam 
Daisy by the great thoroughbred horse imported 
Yorkshire. Peralta is a bay horse, 16 hands high, 
weighs about 1100 pounds, and a very fine individual. 
The Nutwood Wilkes-McKinney cross has produced 
speed every time it has been tried, and while Peralta 
has never been trained, there is no doubtbut he could 
get a low record if put put in the hands of a trainer. 
He is the best bred and the best looking stallion that 
has been sent from America to New Zaaland and will 
help improve the trottiEg breed of horses in that 
country. Since he was sold to Mr. Taska, there have 
been many inquiries about him, and those who have 
looked him over since he has been at the Hulda Stables 
have expressed surprise that such a horse was per- 
mitted to leave the country at the price Mr. Taska 
secured him for. 



SANTA ROSA TRACK will be the centre of attrac- 
tion for California admirers of the harness horse 
from now until the close of the Breeders meeting 
which opens there August 16th. A very large pro- 
portion of the horses named to race at the meeting 
are already at this track, which is in fine condition, 
"he weather is excellent, not too hot for comfort, but 
balmy and warm, with just enough of tho Coast 
breeze to invigorate men and horses. The Santa Rosa 
meeting will be one of the most important held on the 
Pacific Coast this year. The four divisions of the 
two futurity stakes to bo decided will attract the 
attention of every harness horse breeder, and as the 
colts and fillies to start will not be named until August 
7tb, ten days before the meeting opens, there is much 
speculation whether or not from out 1 tho woods" may 
not come young trotters and pacers that may defeat 
the high class youngsters eligible to thesestakes, that 
have already shown their speed and mettle at Los 
Angeles and Fresno. Some of the very fast ones, the 
pacer Rockaway for instance, are not in this stake, 
which should be a warning to every breeder to enter 
his colts in stakes and keep them there, as the earning 
capacity of a colt is very small unless he can -t, rt, in 
stake races. The Santa Rosa meeting will be much 
benefitted this year by the new railroad lines that have 
been completed since last year. An electric line now 
runs from Petaluma to Santa Rosa, passing through 



several small towns on the way, which will make the 
Santa Rosa track accessible to several thousand people 
at a very small cosl, who have heretofore found it 
very inconvenient to visit meetings held there. The 
new line to Napa has also put that thriving city of 
6000 inhabitants within two hours rido of Santa Rosa, 
and the meeting will doubtless draw quite a crowd 
from there. The races to be held promise even faster 
time than resulted at Los Angeles and FresDO. Thero 
is no faster track in California than the one at tho 
county seat of Sonoma county and the people are 
enthusiastic admirers of tho light harness horse, fully 
realizing the fact that the world's champion trotter 
was bred, foaled and first trained to trot at the Santa 
Rosa Stock Farm. There are glorious prospects for 
high class racing and record breaking at the Breeders 
meeting next month. 



TTHE FOLLOWING TRIBUTE to the memory of 
■ the late Blaine S. McMahan was written by Dr. 
J. W. Neal, editor and manager of The Western 
Horseman, and printed in the issue of July 21st of 
that journal. After giving tho facts of tho young 
man's untimely death, tho article says: "On Wednes- 
day afternoon, July 20th, the remains reached Rush 
ville, and Thursday forenoon all that is left of an 
idolized son and brother, a devoted and true friend 
and the emblem of noble young manhood was laid to 
rest. Peace to his ashes and heavenly repose to his 
ever noble, true, companionable and always well- 
meaning spirit. If ever a man lived to the age of 
twenty-five years without making a single enemy in 
the world that man was Blaine S. McMahan. By 
nature always good-humored, affable, pleasant and 
obliging, self-culture and innate regard for the finer 
feelings of others made Blaine S. McMaban a polished 
nobleman among "youDg men of the world," and 
really and truly none knew him only to love and 
respect him. He was the only son of Dr. S. W. Mc- 
Mahan, long a part owner and co-editor of The 
Western Horseman, and Blaine literally grew up in 
The Western Horseman office. Last November he 
went to California, and later connected himself with 
the Breeder and Sportsman as associate editor 
and traveling business and news gatherer and at the 
time of his sad ending was acting also as assistant 
secretary of the PacificCoast Trotting Horse Breeders' 
Association. He leaves behind a devoted mother, 
Mrs. Lydia McMaban, and a worshipful sister, Miss 
Anna, to whom will spontaneously go the sacred sym- 
pathy of hundreds, nay, thousands, of the readers 
of The Western Horseman. The editor of The Western 
Horseman knew Blaine as probably no one else ever 
knew him, and he mourns his loss as the loss of 
an own son." 

MAKE YOUR STARTING PAYMENTS foi the 
divisions of the Pacific Breeders Futurity in 
which you expect to start your colts this year. Thero 
are four events remember, one each for two and three 
year old trotters and pacers. These colt stakes are 
expected to furnish some of Ihe best contests of the 
Santa Rosa meeting, and there will be no races on 
the program that will excite more interest. If you 
can win any part of any stake, or your colt can make 
a good showing in any one heat even, his value in 
case you want to sell, will be added to much more 
than the entrance and starting fees cost. The sums 
to be won in either division of these stakes aie worth 
trying for. The three-year-old trotters have $2000 to 
contest for, tho two-year-old trotters 81000. For the 
three-year-old pacers there is tho neat sum of $1250, 
and for the two-year-olds $750. Then there is $.00 for 
the person who originally nominated the dam of the 
winner of any of these events, and $100 to tho owner 
of the sire of the winner of either of tho three-year- 
old races. The Breeders Futurity is a stake in which 
the money is widely distributed and each prize well 
worth winning. Tho starting payments must be 
made on or before August 7th. See that you make 
payment on your colt in time. 



THE FIRST RENEWAL of the Crowley Stake, 
which is a side stake for starters in tho Pacific 
Breeders Futurity, will close for entries on Tuesday 
next, Augnst 1st. Entries aro already coming in and 
more than ono owner of a foal of 1905 believes he will 
have the winner. This stake was inaugurated last 
year at the suggestion of Mr. T. J. Crowley, and 
received 27 entries at $25 each, a total of $675. There 
is only one payment to be made in this stake — the 
original one of $25 on each entry. The first stake was 
for foals of 1905. Tho renewal is for foals of this year. 
The stake is like a side bet on tho colts that are 
entered in It. The money paid in on the trotting colts 
will go to those that trot, and that paid In on pacerB 
will go to those that pace. Every colt and filly that is 
now eligible to Breeders Futurity No. 5, for foals of 
1905, Is eligible to be entered In the Crowley Stake. 
Owners desiring to enter should read the conditions 



of the stake printed in this issue of th.^ Breeder am 
Sportsman in the advertising colqihns, and send $25 
to Secrotary F. W. Kelley on or botore August 1st, 
with the description and breeding of the foal. 

it <% i s 

TTHE ARIZONA FAIR, to be 'held during tho 
* monlh of December, has attracted the atteption 
many Califc- . horse uk n and sevtral owners of 
fast trotters and pacers have been -figuring on enter- 
ing their horses in the $1000 pureed that havo been 
offered. A fair and a race meeting in December is a 
novelty, but when held at Phoenix, Arizona, during 
that month, perfect woather and a fast track can be 
relied on. Note the ad vertisement in, this issue, acd 
write to the Secretary for further particulars. Entries 
do not close until November 1st, but if yen enter now, 

records made after making tho entrywill not be a bar. 

n q ii — 

Successful Sale. 

The sale of horses consigned to Fred H. Chase & 
Co.'s auction ring by the Occidental Land and 
Improvement Company of Sharon, and Mr. C. E. 
Neodham of Bi-llota, advertised for July 24tb, was a 
very successful one. All the horses that were in good 
condition sold well. Many were not in the best salable 
shape and but a few were of stand a i d hi e ( d : tig, The 
sale pavilion was crowded to its utmost capacity, the 
spectators encroaching cn the ring, and makirg the 
work of the men handling the fet'ock decidedly difficult. 
All the consignors were pleaded with the result of the 
sale. The summary of the salesof $100 or over follows 
consignment of occidental C. & I. CO. 

Dick, b g, 5, by Teheran 2:24, dam Stella, to Jame 8 
Bonney for $120. 

Stella II.. b m, 3, by llderim, dam Stella, to V. Ver- 
hilac for $175. 

Rose, b m, 6, by Ildorim-Rosie, to James Crichton 
for $160. 

Kate, b m, 5, by Ilderim-Katc, to James Cricbtou 
for $140. 

consignment of c. e neediiam. 

Caddie Whipple, b m, 12, by Steve Whipple 2:12, 
dam Caddie by Elect, to J W. Henderson for $115. 

Little Bessie, ch m, 4, by Directed, dam Bessie 
Whipple, to F. Gommet for $122.50. 

Steve D , ch g, 3, by Directed-Daisy Whipple, to D 
Tassi for $127.50. 

Stub, b m, 9, by Directed, dam by Chieftain 721, to 
William Tooms for $195. 

Lady Curzon, b m, 3, "by Guy McKinney, dam Stub 
by Directed, to W. F. Harris for $177.50. 

Mahdeen, hrc. 2, by Guy McKinney, dam Stub, to 
W. Tegler for $160. 

Dock Booth, b c, 1, by Charles Derby, dam Stub, to 
W. Tooms for $110. 

consignment of a. l. dowler. 

Rialto, ch s by Silver Bow, dam Venturess by 
Arthurton, to P. Crowley for $200 

A lot of draft stock was also offered the same even- 
ing and found ready sale at an average of $131.50 per 
head. Oftljj/I 
Edith by Geo. Wilkes Is Dead. 

Very few of the sons and dauphtors of that great 
sire Geo. Wilkes are living. One of tho latest of his 
progeny to succumb to the inevitable is Edith, the 
dam of Idolita 2:09 J , of Hummer sii e of Bouncer 2:09 
and many others. Edith was foaled in April, 1881, 
and bred by B. J. Treacy of Lexington, Kentucky. 
She was one of the mares seleoted by Senator Stanford 
to mate with Electioneer. Her first foal was 
Hummer that is now the sire of 15 trotters and 12 
pacers with standard records, tho fastest of which ur>' 
Bouncer 2:09, State ly 2:11}, Spalpeon 2:12J and Quickly 
2:14$. Edith was not a regular breeder, but produced 
eight foals between 1886 and 1900 at Palo Alto Farm. 
Her only standard performer was Idolita 2 09} by 
Mondocino. She wan sold at ono of the dispersal sales 
of Palo Alto Farm a few years ago, and was purchased 
by James Farls, Jr. of Sacramento, who took her to 
his farm near that city, where she died July 26th. 
Sho left a three months' old foal by Mr. Farls' son of 
Sable Wilkes. Edith was In oolor a rich brown mare. 
Her dam was Edith Carr, the (dam of Campbell's 
Electioneer 2:17iJ, etc., by Clark Chief, second dam 
Easter Carr, by Carr's Edwin Forest, third dam by 
Imported Margrave. 

_ -» 

North Pacific Fairs and Races. 

Walla Walla County Fair Sept. 25-30 

North Yakima, Wash., State Fair... Oct. 2-0 

Spokane Inter-State Fair Oct. 9-14 

Lewlston Inter-State Fair Oct. 16-2$ 

Boise, Idaho, State Fair Sept. 23-30 

Helena, Mont., State Fair Oct. 2-7 

La Grande, Ore., District Fair Sept. 25-30 

Livingston, Mont., County Fair Sept. 4-9 

Bozeman, County Fair Aug. 20-Sept. 1 

Salt Lake, Utah, State Fair Oct 3.-7 



4 



[July 29, 1906 



OPENING OF GRAND CIRCUIT. 

Chamber of Commerce Stake Won by Walter 
Direct and M. & M. by Angle. 

Every heat a race was the plan of the firBt meeting 
on the Grand Circuit which opened at Detroit last 
Monday. After deducting ten per cent of the purse, 
which was to go to the winner of the most heats, the 
money was divided into three equal parts, and one of 
these parts was contested for by the horses in each 
heat, divided as follows into four moneys. For 
instance the Chamber of Commerce Stake $r>000, had 
$500 deduoted for the race winner. The $4500 remain- 
ing was then divided into three equal parts, or $1500 
for each heat. Heat winners therefor got $750, second 
horses $375, third horses $225, and horses that were 
fourth $150. Walter Direct, driven by Ed Geers won 
every heat of theChamber of Commerce and therefore 
earned $2250, to which was added $500 for standing 
bast in the final summary, making his total winnings 
$2750, or $250 more than he would have received by 
the old plan. Bonanza was second in every heat and 
won $1125, as against $1250 by the old style race, F. J. 
Park was 5-3-3 and was awarded $450, instead of $750 
which he would have received as third horse under 
the former method of dividing the money, and the 
fourth horee in the summary, The Contractor, by 
standing 3-4-4 got $525 or $75 more than the third 
horse. Bonnie Wilkes by being fourth in the first 
heat won $150, and although distanced in the second 
heat retained this money. Had the race been a split 
heat affair, that is bad a different horse won each 
heat, the money would have been much more widely 
distributed, but the race would have ended at the 
close of the third heat just the same. 

The Chamber of Commerce Stake was the feature 
event of the opening day of the twenty-second Blue 
Ribbon meeting of the Detroit Driving Club, which 
begins the Grand Circuit of 1905. Walter Direct was 
a heavy favorite, bringing $50 in the pools, with the 
field at $15. 

Hal C. had the pole for the first heat of the 
Chamber of Commerce stakes, with Bonnie Wilkes 
and Walter Direct next in alignment. The horses 
scored several times before the word was given. At 
the first turn Walter Direct took the lead and held it 
into the turn and into the home stretch. Geers then 
made one of his famous drives and won the heat in 
record lime 2:05 3-5. Bonanza, in the last 100 yards 
of the first heat, took second place from The Con- 
tractor by a fine burst of speed. In the next two 
heats Walter Direct was in front from the start. Col. 
J. C. Kirkpatrick 's black pacer, Albuta by Altivo, 
was a starter and was driven by Ban Walker, but 
after finishing sixth in the first heat caught the flag 
in the second. Bystander, the three-year-old Zolock 
colt, also started but was behind the red bunting the 
first time round. 

The first heat of the 2:20 trot saw the field selling at 
$45 to $50 for Hardwood. Hardwood won the first 
heat handily, and the second saw Hardwood a favorite 
at $50 to $12 for the field. It was too simple for Hard- 
wood. For the third heat there was no selling against 
Saunders' good gelding, and Saunders' being eure of 
first place, was satisfied to be last. Delia McCarthy 
by McKinney was one of the starters but after being 
last in two heats was drawn. 

The third race was split, as Geary, who sold for $5 
in pools of $125, won the first heat hands down. The 
second heat saw Geary favorite, but James' gelding 
was not strong enough, and Miss Willimont had 
rather easy picking in the next two heats, finishing a 
length ahead. Ben F., driven by De Ryder, and 
Oregon Maid, piloted by Henry Helman, were sixth 
and seventh ia the summary. Ben F. won $45 by 
being fourth in one heat. The summaries: 

Trotting, 2:20 olass, purse $1500, three heats 

Hardwood, blk g by Gamwood, dam untraced.. (Saunders) i 1 - 

Mlnter, b m by Expedition (Oe Ryder) ■ j ! 

Pa'T-bg • (Paterson 4 3 2 

Belle Isle, bm (L y n 623 

S'ewart.chg. (Castle) 7 7 4 

Charley Atwood, ch h (Murphy) 5 b « 

MaudH., bm (Geers 9 1 ? 

Delia McCarthy b m (MoGuire) 8 8 dr 

Malnsheet, blk h (Thomas) 2 dr 

Tlme-2:115i, 2:113£, 2:14*. 

Paolng,2:»4 olass, Chamber of Commerce Stake, three-heat plan 

Walter Direot, b h by Direct Hal, dam Ella Brown 

• ••(>••••• ...».•>....,.... ,(G 06 rs) lii 

Bonanza, b g by Alfonsa Vincent (Thomas) 2 <> o 

F. J. Park, b h by Varlel (Lyon i \ ? 

The Contractor, rg (Stokes) 344 

Bonale Wilkes, ch m by Fred Wilkes (Howard) 4 d 

Albuta. blk g by Altivo (Walker) 6 d 

Druid Vlxson, brm by Judge Swing (S Snider) d 

Hal C . oh g by Hal Dillard (b. Shank) d 

MIssGeorgie. b m by Regal Wilkes (Benyon) d 

Bystander, b g by Zolock (Wheat) d 

Tlme-2:05'4, 2:06' / 4, 2:07^. Average, 2:06V4. 

Pacing, 2:03 class, purse $1500, tli roe heats. 
Miss Willimont, b m by Bostlck's Aimont, dam untraced 

(Snow) 5 11 

Geary, ch g by Five Points (Jamesj 1 3 3 

DonCarr.bg (Clark) 2 2 8 

Ethel Mc.chm (McCarthy) 10 9 2 

Shylock.bg (McMahon) 3 4 4 

BenP.,bg (DiRyder) 4 10 12 

Oregon Maid, b m (Helman) 8 8 5 

Elmwood, brg (Snvder) 12 5 9 

BlackPet.blkm (Gott) 9 6 7 



Irish.chh (A.Thomas) 7 11 6 

Baron Rogers, br g (Shank) 8 7 10 

Don N , rg (Valentine) 11 12 11 

Steln.bg (Geers) d 

Time— 2:07?^, 2:07*. 2:09. 

SECOND DAY. 

The A.xt )1! ma e Aojle, drivan by Ge >r^e Saunders, 
won the $10,000 M. & M. state on Tuesday, the second 
day of the meeting, that is, she took the first and 
third heats and the biggest portion of the stake. She 
was unsteady in the second heat which went to Geer's 
mare Clarita W., that was favorite before the race. 
The time of the raoe was not specially fast, the heats 
being 2:124, 2:10£ and 2:11. Angle earned $4000, Clarita 
W. $2250, Watson $1800, Danube $900, Emma Hoyt 
$750 and Getaway $300. Brilliant Girl, driven by 
Jack Curry, was a starter in this event but was drawn 
after being eighth in the first heat, and Mr. De La 
Montanya's other mare, Tuna, also driven by Curry, 
got the flag in the 2:08 trot, two heats of which were 
won by Tom Axworthy in 2:074/, 2:07}, and the last 
and final heat by Dr. Strong in 2:06. 

A heavy shower fell while the first heat of the 
opening event in the day's card, the 2:14 pace, was 
being driven. The track was soaked, and it took an 
hour and a half's work with harrows to place it in 
condition for the first heat of the M. &. M. 

For the opening race, the 2:15 pace, Re<I Bud was 
an even-money favorite against the field, but Red Bud 
was no where and finished sixth, while Hazel Banks 
won easily. The second heat saw Hazel Banks a 
favorite at $25 to $10 for the field. Red Bud took the 
lead owing to Hazal's break and finished easily in 



Trotting, 2:24 class, Merchants' & Manufacturers' Stake, $10,000. 

Angle, ch m by Axtell, dam by Qambanito. (G. Saunders) 

Clarita W , ch m by Grattan (Geers) 

Watson, s g by Hinder Wilkes (Wickersham) 

Danube br h by Dlrecho (De Ryder) 

Emma Hoyt, b m by Czar (Stinson) 

Getaway, ch g by Strathway (Helman) 

Emily Letcher, b m by Gambetta Wilkes (Benyon) 

Brilliant Girl, b m by James Madison (Curry) 

Miss In-Law, b m by Ponce de Leon (Tracey ) 

Allie Jay, b m by Jayhawker (Kenny) d 

Time— 2:12%, 2:10' / 4, 2:11. 

Trotting, 2:08 class, purse $1500. 

Tom Axworthy, ro g by Axworthy (M.Sanders) 1 1 2 

Dr. Strong, g g by Strong Boy (McDonald) 2 2 1 

Direct View, brg (De Ryder) 3 3 4 

Anglola, bm (Ames) 6 5 8 

Maxine. bm — (Geers) 4 4 5 

Tuna bm (Curry) 5 6 d 

Snyder McGregor, ch g (Hogan) d 

Time— 2:07«, 2:07 M, 2:06. 

THIRD DAY. 

An excellent track and fine weather was the order 
for the third day at Detroit, and the horses stepped 
fast in every event, but one heat being slower thsn 
2:10 during the afternoon. 

The 2:04 pace had but three starters, but it was a 
horse race with Locanda winner of the big end of the 
purse. This was a heavy bettiDg race. Pools Fold 
with Nathan Strauss $400, King Direct $200 and Lo- 
canda $150. Snow took Locanda out in front, and 
after making the half in 1:02 bad enough left to stand 
off Nathan Strauss in the stretch and win by half a 
length in 2:05. In the second mile Locanda came the 
last quarter in 0:29|, and again beat Nathan Strauss. 
Nathan Strauss set the pace in the third heat and led 
to the stretch, where Locanda passed him and in turn 




Edwin S. 2:08 by Doctor Hicks 



front. The third was a procession, Red Bud being in 
front all the way. 

Before the Merchants and Manufacturers' Stake 
was called Clarita W., Geer's entry for the stake, waB 
the favorite in the early pools, bringing $125, with 
Angle at $100, Danube $75, Allie Jay $25, Watson, 
Brilliant Girl and Bob Burdette $20 each, and the 
other entries $10. 

When the word was given Allie Jay broke away in 
front, but soon collapsed and Angle went to the front 
and held it, with Brilliant Girl and Clarita W. as 
contenders. Angle won easily through the stretch 
and Clarita W. and Emma Hoyt fought it for second 
place. In the second heat Angle broke at the start 
and never had a chance to win. Clarita W. trotting 
down the homestretch with Watson at her shoulder. 
The third heat saw Clarita W. at $50, with the field 
lively at $40. Watson made the pace clear to the 
stretch and there Angle came fast and won out 
handily. 

Tom Axworthy was favorite at $150 to $90 on the 
field in the 2:08 trot. He .von the first heat easily, but 
in the second was pushed out by Dr Strong. Dr- 
Strong went to the front at the quarter in the third 
heat and trotted home in easy style in 2:06, the fastest 
mile trotted this year Summaries: 

Pacing, 2:15 class, purse $1500. 

Red Bud, b g by Redwing (Stokes) 6 1 l 

Hazel Banks, blk m by Sirllss (Snow) 1 2 2 

High Seven, oh g (I. Stuard) 2 7 5 

Wester, blkg (Valentine) 5 3 4 

KobertLee.bg (Hoffman) 8 4 3 

Birdie B..grm (Marsh) 3 6 8 

Bedford Boy, ro g (Brawley) 4 8 7 

Sally Pointer, br m (Wheat) 7 5 6 

Paul, blkg (Hogan) d 

Tlme-2:10tf, 2:07!*, 2:06Ji. 



was beaten out by Geers, with King Direct in a great 
finish. 

The 2:12 trot resulted in one of the best races of 
the year with Sadie Mac winner of all three heats. 
Ed Geers' mare, Gold Dust Maid, drove her out the 
first heat in 2:06J, but Sadie was going easy at the 
finish and locked as if 2:03 would not stop her. Mack 
Mack was fourth in this heat, but in the next two 
heats which were in 2:08i and 2:11, he was two, 
three, while Gold Dust Maid was distanced in the 
second heat. John Caldwell finished a good third in 
the first heat, but also got the flag in the second heat. 

Bolivar got a heat and second position in the final 
summary of the 2:18 class pace, and his record is now 
2:09}. He is Way land W.'s first 2:10 performer. The 
summaries: 

Pacing, 2:04 class, purse $1500. 

Looanda, br h by Allerton-Kathrina (Snow) lis 

King Direct, blk h by Direct (Geers) 3 3 1 

Nathan Strauss, b g (Thomas) 2 3 3 

Time— 2:05, 2:08*, 2:06. 

Trotting, 2:12 olass, purse $1500. 

Sadie Mac, b m by Peter the Great-Fannella. .. (Stinson) 1 l i 

MackMack, b g by MoKinney (Hellman) 4 2 3 

Major Greer, oh g (McCarthy) 5 3 2 

Gold Dust Maid, blk m (Geersl 2 d 

JobnCaldweil.bg (Thompson) 3 d 

Flash Lightning, b g (Brown) 6 d 

Gold Standard, b g (Castle) d 

Time-2:06V4, 2:08tf, 2:11. 

Pacing, 2:18 olass, purse $1500. 

Maud Keswiok, b m by Keswick (James) 1 3 1 

Bolivar, b g by Wayland W (De Ryder) i 1 3 

Black Patchen, blk g (Hogan) 4 2 2 

Charlie Patch, blk h (Valentine) 3 8 8 

MajorWilson.bg (S. Bogash) 5 6 4 

InterOeean.bg (Thomas) 9 4 5 

Regina.ohm (H.Stokes) 10 5 7 

Tommy Burns, b g (MoCarthy) 8 7 6 

Red Nightingale, br m (M.Stokes) 6 9 9 

BillieA.,bg (Wheat) 7 10 d 

Time— 2:08K, 2:09*. 2:09. 



July 29, 1905] 



Last Two Days at Fresno. 

Friday, the third day of the Breeders meeting at 
Fresno, saw an increased attendance and the racing 
was up to the standard, the winners of both harness 
races reducing their previous records. 

The three-year-old pace brought together fivefillies 
of great merit, and while Delilah by Zolock won 
rather easily In the first two heats, she made a break 
just after the word was given in the third heat and 
was over a distance out before getting on her stride. 
She paced the last three-quarters, however, in l:36jj, 
the last half in 1:03:} and the last quarter in 31 seconds 
and won the heat by two lengths. She is a great filly 
and gives every promise of pacing close to 2:10 this 
year. It will be remembered that she was the fastest 
two-year-old pacer in the United States last year, 
getting a record of 2:16} when she won the pacing 
division of the Breeders Futurity at San Jose. She is 
by Zolock 2:05}, out of the great broodmare, Gipsey, 
thegrandam of Zolock. 

The 2:17 trot was won by the gray gelding What Is 
It, son of Direct 2:05J and Lassie Jean, the dam of 
Who Is It 2:10}. He won in three straight heats. 
Cuate was the favorite in this race, but was drawn 
before getting the word in the first heat. After 
scoring the trotters for over half an hour, and being 
sent to the stables for being on the three-year-old 
pacers' time, the judges permitted Cuate to be with- 
drawn after two veterinary surgeons had examined 
him and given certificates that he was sick and un- 



able to race. While the race was decided in three 
straight heats it was a hard contest for the gray horse 
and he had to trot his best every heat to beat Jupiter 
B. and The Commonwealth. 

The automobile races proved very interesting con- 
tests although no records were smashed. The sum- 
maries: 

Sunny Side Stakes, three-year-old paccrB, $6O0. 
Delilah, b f by Zolock-Glpsey by Gen. Booth.. .(Delaney) 1 1 1 

Mono Wilkes, b f by Demonlo (Chadbourne) 2 2 2 

Memonlo, b f by Domonlo (Reams) 4 3 3 

Devlletta, b f by Diablo (Wright) 3 4 4 

Roberta, blk f by Robert I (Albertson) ds 

Time by quarters- 
First heat.... :34 1:07 1:40 2:I4>/, 
Second beat.. :34Vi 1:08% i 13* 2:14% 
Third heat.... :34% 1:10 1:46 2:17 

Hughes Hotel Stakes, 2:17 class trotters, $800. 

What Is It, gr g by Direct-Lassie Jean (Chadbourne) 1 1 1 

Jupiter B., b g by Oen. Beverley (Erwln) 3 2 2 

The Commonwealth, b s bj Shadeland Onward (Lindsay) 2 4 (Is 

Zambra, b g by MoKlnney (Ward) 4 3 ds 

Time by quarters— 

First heat.... :34* 1:08!/, 1:42 2:14* 
Second beat.. :34 1:07 1:42 2:14% 
Third heat.... :34 1:07* 1:42 2:15 
Cuate was drawnon account of slokness after scoring but before 
word was given In the first beat. 

LAST DAY. 

A large crowd that filled the grandstand and all the 
available standing room about it. saw three good 
races on the last day of the Breeders meeting at 
Fresno. The first race called was the 2:17 pace for a 
purse of 8800, in which seven horses scored for the 
word in the first heat. The talent had picked Nellie 
R. the mare owned by Joseph Long of Eureka, to win 
and she sold for 310, against 810 for the entire field. 
There was considerable scoring, Little Joe acting 
badly, but when they got the word Cresco Wilkes, 



®he gveebev cmt» Sportsman 



the four-year- old by Nutwood Wilkes owned by Mr. 
I. L. Borden of San Francisco, went out in front and 
won without being headed in 2:10^, although he was 
driven hard to keep Nellie R. from getting her head 
in front at the finish. The second heat resulted in a 
nose and nose finish between these two in 2:12£, and in 
the third heat Norda tried hard to head the Wilkes 
pacer but he was at the wire first in 2:l(iJ. Miss Winn, 
Little Joe and Little Jib were distanced in the first 
heat and Norda and Economizer divided third and 
fourth moneys between them. 

The 2:09 class pace saw eight out of the eleven 
original entries go to the post, and Zolock drew tho 
pole. He could have taken the outside and beaten 
the others, and won the two heats as he pleased in 
2:09$ and 2:08. He was barred in tho pools and Kelly 
Briggs made favorite at $10 to $6 for the field con- 
sisting of Rita H., Jonesa Baslea, Daedalion, Miss 
Idaho, Le Roi and Hassalo. Kelly Briggs got the 
pool money hy coming 2-3 in the summary, Rita H. 
being given a ripping drive by Durfee in the second 
heat and finishing second to Zolock, who was shaken 
up some by Delaney when be saw Rita's burst of 
speed, although the son of McKinney won easily in 
2:08. 

Will Durfee was asked to drive Oro Belmont in the 
last race, and that horse was made favorite in the 2:22 
trot, which he won in straight heats, with Sam 
Bowers second and Lady Jones third. Wilmar was 
drawn after the first heat, owing to sickness. The 
summaries: 



Pacing, 2:17 clasf, purse $800. 
Cresco Wilkes, b b by Nutwood Wllkcs-Allio Cresco 

(Albertson) 1 1 1 



Nellie It., b m by Way land W (Quinn) 2 2 4 

Norda, b m by Mercury (Bonnell) 3 4 2 

Economizer, b m by Chas. Derby (C Silva) 4 3 3 

Miss Winn, ch m by Demonlo (Reams) dis 

Little Joe, b g by Diablo (Hoy) dls 

Little Jib, b g by Nutwood Wilkes (McDonald) dis 



Time by quartors — 

First heat.... -.32% 1:05 1:39* 2:10% 

Second hoat..:33V4 I '»!', 1:40 2 12! . 

Third heat... :33tf 1:08 1:43 2:16K 

Pacing, 2:09 class, purse $800. 



Zolock, br s by McKlnney-Qazelle 2:ll'/4 (Delaney) 1 1 

Kelly Briggs, b g by Bayswator Wilkes (Wright) 2 3 

RltaH.,brm by McKinney (Durfee) 7 2 

Le Roi, br g by Altamont (Lindsay) 3 4 

Miss Idaho, by Nutwood Wilkes (Springer) 4 6 

Daedalion, b g by Diablo (Ward) 5 5 

Jonesa Basler, br s by Robert Baslcr (Owens) 6 7 

Hassalo, br g by Westfleld (Erwln) dls 

Time by quarters- 
First heat. .. .:S2 1 04 1:37*4 2:09*4 
Second heat.. :32'/, 1:04*4 1:37* 2:08 

Trotting, 2:22 class, purse $600. 

Oro Bolmont. b g by Oro Wilkes, by Director (Durfee) 1 I 1 

Sam Bowers, ch g by Joe Simpson (Lindsay) 2 6 2 

Lady Jones, hi m by Capt Jones (Oreen) 6 2 8 

Little Babe, blk m by Bradtmoor (Hoy) 3 3 4 

Miss Mabel, b m by Thompson (Delaney) 4 4 6 

Billy Dooley, b g by Bay Bird (Freeman) 7 5 5 

Wilmar, b g ty Wlldnut (Quinn) 5 dr 



Time by quarters- 
First heat :34 1:08 I 12*4 2:18*4 

Seoond heat . .:31 1:09 1:44 2:16*4 

, Third heat :34 1:08 1:44 2:17 



John Shepard, Boston's oldest and most noted ama- 
teur relnsman, has agreed to take part in a special 
race at Syracuse during the State Fair with his trot- 
ter, Alto L. 2:09}, against the trotting mare Ida High- 
wood 2:09}, owned and driven by Nathan Straus, a 
noted amateur relnsman of New York. To the win- 
ner of the race will be presented a handsome silver 
trophy, and those who seo the contest are likely to 
see one or both «f the horses beat 2:10 to wagon. 



5 



Benefit to Willard Zibbell. 

On Monday at Fresno, the horsemen and the towns 

people tendered a benefit to Willard Zibbell, the 
popular ycung trainer who lost both hands and one 
foot in the recent railroad accident at that place. A 
good program of dash races was arranged, in which 
the horses were driven to the top of their speed, but 
no purses or prizes were contested for and no betting 
was done on the results. More than a thousand people 
attended, and $700 was the amount realized and turned 
over to Mr. Zibbell. All the participants tendered 
their services free and everybody paid at the gate. 
The most remarkable thing in connection with tho 
benefit was the fact that the beneficiary was able to 
ba present. Although the accident occurred but ten 
days previous, and he had ono leg, one arm and the 
other hand amputated, was bruised and lacerated 
about tho body, and his remaining leg broken, yet he 
was able to bo put into a large automobile by his 
physician and attendants and taken to the track 
where he was cheered by the crowd, and bowed his 
acknowledgements. Not one person in a hundred 
would have survived the shock and terrible Injuries 
he received, yet his splendid physique, perfect health 
and fine condition enabled him to withstand it. He 
never even lost consciousness at the time of the 
accident, but mangled as he was managed to crawj 
out from under the car and talk to those who came to 
his aid, his principal thoughts being of his companion 
Blaine McMahan, who was killed. The wonderful 
grit and endurance of young Zibbell are a marvel to 
the physicians and everybody acquainted with his 
condition after the cars had run over him. He will 
be brought to his home In San Francisco in a few 
days. 

When the races were called, Mr. C. A Durfee was 
in the stand as starter, and the judges were George L. 
Warlow, M. L. Woy and E. P. Heald; the timers, J- 
R. Albertson, John Lane and James irvin. All the 
events were single heats. 

The first heat was between the pacers Miss Winn, 
Ring Rose, Loganette and Norda. The three first 
named finished noses apart in 2:12}. 

Charlie T., Satin Royal, H. D. B. and Mabel C. 
made a nice conte3t. Satin Royal was far behind at 
tho finish, while H. D. B. finished first, his head in 
front of Mabel C. who had her nose slightly in front 
of Charlie T. in 2:14}. 

Oro Belmont finished a length in the lead of Wild 
Bell in the next contest, Dew Drop being the other 
starter. The time was 2:21. 

Bellemont, the three-year-old filly by Zombro, and 
the three-year-old Ambush by Zolock worked a heat. 
It was very close to the stretch where Ambush broke 
and Bellemont was first to the wire in 2:20J. 

Prince McKinney, the two-year-old in Al Mc- 
Donald's string, trotted a very creditable mile in 
2:29} against F. E. Wright's Lijero that had tho heat 
won but broke in the stretch. 

Dr. W. and Bessie Barnes were the starters in the 
next race. Bessie Barnes made two breaks and Dr. 
W. finished the mile pulled up in 2:23. 

The Donna, Marty McKay's mare, was driven an 
exhibition half in 1:02, and Petigru trotted a quarter 
in 32 seconds. 

Elmont, Selda and Lady R. trotted a mile and 
finished in the order named in 2:18}. 

The mule races were the principal events of the 
day. The first was a match race between C R.Cook's 
Maud and Dick Roberts' Bell. Cook won and was 
presented with a loving cup. It was about fcur feet 
in height, of tin, and contained an armful of hay. It 
was the only prize of the day. 

There wore five starters in the other mule race. 
"Sky " Hess won with his entry, Cook being second and 
Roberts third. There was lots of fun In this event. 

A Shetland pony race of a quarter of a mile ended 
the program. Bob Kundo's two entries were In har- 
ness while Louis Bachant's "Bob" and Middleton's 
pony each carried a rider. The start was made|on 
even terms, nevertheless, and to the surprise of the 
spectators ono of the harness ponies finished ahead. 
It was Knudo's 'Billy Koote." Bachant's pony came 
second and Middleton's third. 



Among the horsos trained in California last winter 
that took new records at the Windsor meeting last 
week were Josle by Glenelg (sUter to Billy Red 2:10) 
who reduced her record to 2:09} and won the 2:12 
pace. Danube by Direcho, that won the 2:17 trot In 
straight heats and took a mark of 2:13}, and Bolivar 
by Wayland W. that won the 2:17 pace, getting a new 
record of 2:11} In the second beat. All these horses 
are In the Butler string and were driven by Chas. De 
Ryder. The California bred mare, Zephyr 2:11 by 
Zombro, won the 2:11 trot In straight heats on the 
last day of the meeting, in the good time of 2:12}, 
2:124 and 2.12}, with Mack Mack second In each heat. 
Zephyr Is In Ed Geer's string. 

Jackson's Napa Soda Is sold In every city, town 
and hamlet in the State. 




Delilah (3) 2:14* by Zolock 2:05} 



[July 29, 1£C5 



Notes and News. 

Entries close An-gust 1st ior the Crowley Stake No. 

2,.forJo»lB.p/.l906^,r r nw. .. - :-ss^i .< - 

The Breeders meeting will open at Santa Rosa, 

Wednesday, August 16th. 



California has produced more 2:10 per/oro ers this 
year than any other State in tne Union. 



Little Squaw 2:044, who is out as a trotter this sea- 
son, has 101 winning beat9 to her credit. 



.very horseman that has seen the new track at 
Sacramento, predicts it will be a fast one. 



Five California horses started on the opening day 
of the Detroit meeting and none got any money. This 
is a i ecord. 

The fastest trotter of the year up to Thursday of 
this week is Dr. Strong 2:06, and Sadie Mac is only a 
fraction of a second behind him. 



The horses of W. A. Clark, Jr., are at Rsadvil'e, in 
charge of Trainer Ted Hayes, who is said to be quite 
seriously ill in a Boston hospital. 

The wiil of the late C. F. Dunbar of Buffalo, N. Y.. 
provides that hia. favorite driving horse, Volunteer 
Medium 2:14}, be pensioned for life. 



The Grand Circiiit racing will shift to Cleveland 
next Monday, and the following week they will be at 
Buffilo, where the $10,000 2:10 trot will be decided. 



W. J. Andiews has worked the trotting mare Nora 
McKinney by McKinney better than 2:14, with a half 
n 1:041. She is sound and has a great flight of speed. 



The addressof Secretary E. D. Neff, of theSouthern 
California Horse Show Association, is Pasadena, Cali- 
fornia, and not Riverside as has been erroneously 
stated. 

Clarence Day, who has been at Concord all spring 
with bis stallion, Dictatus 2:17, has returned to his 
home in Alameda. Dictatus made a good season at 
Concord. 

Sister Colette has worked a mile in 2:12}, last half in 
2:05$, last quarter in 31 1 seconds. She is a sister to 
Charley Herr 2:07 and is in David Cahill's stable at 
Lexington. ] j 

The time by quarters in tbo race at 'Philadelphia, 
last week, when Tiverton beat Sweet Marie, was as 
follows: First heat :301, 1:02, 1:38, 2:101. Second heat 
:31}, 1:03, l:c6, 2:07$. 

The 2:17 irot at Fresno, won by What Is It, was 
the heaviest betting race the circuit has furnished 
thus far. Some three or four thousand dollarschanged 
hands on the result. 

Read the ad vertlsement of the Arizona Territorial 
Fair and race meeting in our business columns. There 
area number of $1000 purses that should be easy 
money for California horses. 



Mamie R. (2) 2:1 5A. is not doing as well as was ex- 
pected when she was taken East. She was distanced 
in a heat in 2:1.13 at Windsor, a rate of speed that 
would not have beaten her to the wire last year. 



Mr. Billings d rove Lou Dillon a mile in 2:06} and 
Major Delmar a mile in 2:05$ at Cleveland a week ago 
last Saturday. Tom Axworthy stepped in 2:071, 
Morning Star stepped in 2:06$. They were all to 
wagon. 

The pacing race arranged some time ago between 
Audubon Boy and Ecstatic will have an added starter 
in Belie Mac. The race is said to be for $5000 a corner, 
winner takes all. The race will be paced August 18 
atReadville. 

Had some track owner been sufficiently enterpris- 
ing to advertise a meeting at some convenient point 
between the close of the Fresno and the opening of 
the Santa Rosa meetings, he would have secured a 
good list of entries 

John Quinn and , John Green were the first horse- 
men to reach Santa Rosa with their strings after the 
Fresno meeting, arriving there last Tuesday morning. 
By the last of this week the stalls will nearly all be 
full. The Santa Rosa track is in fine shape. 

Every farmer and breeder should make an effort to 
visit the California BtftW Fair this year. The display 
of 1 Te stock shown will be one of the best ever held, 
and wiil be exhibited to much better advantage than 
ever before. The fair will open September 2d. 



We received a long communication from Pleasanton 
this week which We cannot publish as the name of the 
wr.ter was not aftix«d It '•Railblrd" will send us his 
name (not for publication but simply to show his good 
faith) we will be pleased lp ;;Hnt the communication. 



After C uate 2:18 was withdrawn from the 2:17 trot 
at Fresno on account of sickness he became a very 
sick horse, suffering from impaction of the bowels, 
and on Tuesday last, the day his owner, C. A. Durfee, 
left Fresno he did not think the McKinnoy gelding 
would live. 



Arner 2:17} is back at Pleasanton after a prosperous 
and successful season at Chico. The full brother to 
Diablo never looked better, and Barnej Simpson may 
conclude to lower his record a little before the winter 
rains set in. A mark of 2:10 is not beyond Arner'e 
capabUities. 

Starting payments are due August 7th on the two- 
year-olds and three-year-olds that are to start this 
year in those divisions of the Pacific Brt eders Futur- 
ity. See the advertisement. These stakes will be 
decided at the Santa Rosa meeting which opens 
August 16th. 

The new record of 2:09} made by the mare Josie at 
the Windsor meeting made her dam, Bunella by 
Ingraham, the dam of two 2:10 pacers, Billy Red 2:10 
being a full brother to Josie. At Detroit on Thurs- 
day of this week Josie reduced her record to 2:08} in 
the third heat. 

A correspondent at Honolulu sends us an interestirg 
letter but fails to sign his name. We would be pleased 
to publish the same, but cannot violate our rule in 
regard to uns'gned communications. Will the writer 
please send us his name, not for publication, however, 
unless he so desires. 

It is told in and about Pleasanton that the finest 
foal by Searchlight 2:03} is the one following Captain 
Ford Thomas' McKinney mare. The mare herself is 
one of the handsomest animals in the State, and her 
colt by Searchlight is endowed with all the good looks 
of both its parents. This mare was bred to Strathway 
this year and is in foal 



Marty McKay's dun mare The Donna by Athadon 
wo'-ked a great mile at the Fresno track one morniDg 
durine the meeting last week. She turned the track 
in 2:08, several watches catching the mile in 2:07}. 
The Donna paced this mile very handily and the 
opinion is general among horsemen that she will do to 
start in almost any class next year. 



It was not Millard Sanders who drove Angle to 
victory in the M. & M. at Detroit but the well known 
Cleveland trainer, George Saunders, who purchased 
the mare for Mr. C. Morris of Cleveland and trained 
her for this big event. Angle is a mare of wonderful 
speed and worked a mile in 2:06} last year behind a 
wind shield, but is somewhat flighty. 



The three-year-old colt Bystander by Zolock was 
distanced in the first heat of the Chamber of Com- 
merce Stake at Detroit, and met the same fate in the 
Consolation end of the stake. It is asking a little too 
much of a good three-year-old to expect him to win 
money in a stake that attracts such a olass of aged 
horses as is always entered in the C. of C. 



Cresco Wilkes, the very handsome colt by Nut- 
wood Wilkes that won the 2:17 pace on the last day 
of the Fresno meeting, reducing his record to 2:10}, is 
owned by Director I. L. Borden of the P.C.T. H. B.A. 
and is out of his mare Allie Cresco 2:13} by Cresco, son 
of Strathmore. Cresco Wilkes is a four-year-old . He 
took a record of 2:17 at the State Fair last year in the 
Occident Stanford pace. 



The fifteen-year-old stallion Holly Woodnut 2:20}, 
owned by E. B. Long of the Harlem Valley Stock 
Farm, White Plains, N. Y., dropped dead from heart 
disease In a pasture on the farm one day last week. 
He was sired bv Woodnut 2:16}, son of Nutwood 2:18}; 
dam Charm (dam of eight standard performers) by 
Santa Claus 2:171, son of Strathmore. Holly Wood- 
nut was the sire of one trotter, Ned H. Woodnut 2:18$. 



Mr. A. B. Rodman, of Woodland, has purchased all 
the horses in training owned by the late R. H. Nasoc, 
who died recently at that place. The horses pur- 
chased are Tubelina, a four-year-old daughter of 
Tuberose; a two-year-old stallion by Diablo out of 
Mischief, the dam of Tuberose; a two-year-old filly by 
Falrose, out of a mare by Tuberose, and Mischief 
2:22$, dam of Tuberose2:25}, and other promising ones. 



W. P. Murray's trotting mare Italia 2:23} by Zona- 
bro, is working good . She is in Doc Tanner's stable 
and has been a mile in 2:16}. She acts better than 
she ever has and is about ready for a mile around 
2:10 Those who have noticed her in her work are 
unanimous in the opinion that she is better now tban 
at any time since Mr. Murray brought her from Cali- 
fornia. She will probably go into Vance Nuckols' 
stable to be raced later in the season. 



Frank Turner stepped his young Sidney Dillons 
again at Santa Rosa last week and here are the re- 
sults. Carlocita, three-year-old pacer, mile in 2:20$, 
half in 1:05}, quarter in :31}. Guy Dillon, three-year- 
old trotter, mile in 2:34, half in 1:15, quarter in :33. 
Carrie Dillon, two-year o'd pacer, mile in 2:26, last 
quarter in 34 seconds. Kate Dillon, two-year-old pacer 
half in 1:08. Henry Parrity beat 2:30 with his two- 
year old Bravo Dillon, with the last half in 1:11 and 
the last quarter in 35 seconds. 



The Hulda Stables on Fell street, opposite the Park 
pan handle, is now under the management of John 
Martin, who is making it the most popular boarding 
stable in the city. The location cannot be surpassed 
for those whoindulgein park driving, asno ear tracks 
have to be crossed to reach the park and ocean drives. 
Among the fast roadsters stabled there now are Eros- 
mont by Er09 that has shown a mile in 2:15$, Mulcaby 
by Dexter Prince with a trial of 2:12}, John D , a 
green trotter, that has beaten 2:25 in bis work and 
Billy G with a mark of 2:19$. The famous saddle 
horse Kentucky Prince, one of the best gaited horses 
on the Coast, is also stabled there. Mr. Martin takes 
a pride in keeping all the horses under his care in 
perfect order. 



The Sonoma County Driving Club was permanently 
organized at Santa Rosa last week with 80 charter 

members. The officers are P. H. Quinn, president; 
W. H. Lumsden, vice-president; H. A. Canton, sec- 
retory: L. W. Burris, treasurer Board of Directors — 
P. H. Quinn, W. H. Lumsden, H. A. Carlton, L. W. 
Burris, T. L. Hehir, Frank S. Turner, Dr. J. T. 
O'Brien, G. W. Kingsbury, W. C Nolan, Frank Bur. 
ris, C. O Dunbar. This club will hold matinee and 
regular race meetings and an active membership of 
200 is predicted for it within a month. 

Henry Delaney having decided not to enter Zolock 
2:05} in the free-for-all pace at the California State 
Fair meeting this year, that race should result in one 
of the greatest contests seen on this Coast for years 
While Zolock outclasses the other pacers on the 
Coast, there are four or five that can beat 2:07 that 
will enter, and that are so evenly matched that the 
winner will be very hard to pick The State Fair 
Directors are negotiating with Mr. Delaney for an ex- 
hibition mile by bis great horse, aud there will be a 
big crowd to see him start against time. 



It is surmised that after the close of the Japanese- 
Russian war there may be quite a demand for Ameri- 
can-bred general purpose horses in those two coun- 
tries. The demand In Japan is likely to be for horses 
not above the medium in size, except, perhaps, such 
as the Japanese may want for breeding purposes. 
They are an enterprising, progressive class of peop'e 
there, and close imitators of American methods, so 
that it is not improbable that they may engage quite 
extensively in the breeding of high-class trotting 
stock as well as that for cavalry and general purpose 
use. 

The ranks of the sons of George Wilkes 2:22, are 
gradually depleting. The latest to join the great 
majo ity is Erie Wilkes, really one of the least success- 
ful of the get of his noted sire asaprogenitor of speed. 
He Is credited with only four standard perfoim<rs, 
the fastest being Polar Wilkes, p, 2:11}, and Turco, p, 
2:12. But two of his sons have sired speed, and two of 
his daughters have each produced one. It was not 
exactly lack of opportunity, either, which accounts 
for bis poor showing, he was a member of the Jewett 
farm stallions for a number of years He was 23 years 
old. George Wilkes was 25 years old when be got 
Erie Wilkes. Old age did not avail much in this case. 



Wo regret to learn that Mr. T. J. Weeks, ono of the 
pioneer residents and horse breeders of Santa Cruz, 
died a few weeks ago at his home there on the shores 
of the Pacific. Mr. Weeks bred and owned a number 
of good horses, among others that fast mare Ethel 
Downs 2: 10, well known to all horseraeD in this State. 
He was one of the earliest residents of the now thriv- 
ing city of Santa Cruz, and owned a very handsome 
residence which occupied a commanding site on a 
bill close to the seashore and overlooking the city. 
He was a plain, unassuming gentleman, whose friends 
were as numerousas h's acquaintances, and was highly 
respected and honored for his sterling virtues and up- 
right life. 

An eastern exchange says: "Mr. Gee. E. Lalt imer, 
of Buffalo, owns a full brother to The Abbott 2:03}, 
ex-champion trotter. The name of the joung trotter 
is The Mitre Beaver. Mr. Lattimer owns one of the 
most extensive privatestables in Buffalo, and is classed 
among the crack amateur reinsmen of the country. 
He owns Charley Hayt 2:06}, Topsy 2:09} and others. 
At the Buffalo track, one morning last week, Charley 
Hayt 2:06} and Captain Derby 2:16} worked a mile 
together in 2:14$, last half in 1:04$, covering the third 
quarter in 31 seconds. Charley Hayt give9 every 
promise of getting into form to beat his record this 
year, and Captain Derby, unless all signs fail, will 
take a record around 2:07 if all yoes well with him. 
He was bred at Oakwood Park Stock Farm and is by 
Charles Derby, out of Economy 2:30 by Echo." 



The former Buffalo trainer, George Bodimer, who 
hss been in Austria for several years, has opened the 
racing season there most successfully this year. He 
has captured the world's record for Austrian bred 
trotters with the filly Ama Z , and with the four-year- 
old colt Lord Revelstoke by Bingen, that he bought 
in this country last fall he won the great event of the 
Vienna spring meeting, the free-for-all heat race, re- 
ducing the chestnut colt'srecord from 2:12} to 2:12$ 
in the first beat of his race and again to 2:12} in the 
last heat. Lots of good judges thought Lord Revel- 
stoke would never lower his record after his some- 
what unsatisfactory campaign of last season. Ama Z , 
Bodimer's champion Austrian bred trotter, Is from 
American bred parents, as she was sired by Caid 2:07}, 
dam Charmer, dam of Shadow Chimes 2:17} by Mam- 
brion King. Both her sire and dam are owned by 
Count Poticki, Bodimer's employer, and to the Buffalo 
boy belongs the credit of developing her. 



The affection displayed for his owner hy Willard 
Zibbeil's horse, Adam G 2:14}, was truly touching 
when the handsome trotter was led out for the 
maimed and crippled young man to look at on the 
day of the benefit tendered Mr. Zibhell at the Fresno 
track. As our readers know Willard lost both bands, 
an arm and a leg in the frightful accident at Fresno, 
July 12th, and his marvelous vitality enabled him to 
be taken to the track eleven days after, when the 
horsemen tendered him a benefit. He was conveyed 
to the track in Dr. Maupins' automobile, and his 
favorite horse was led out for his inspection. The 
young man spoke to him, when Adam G. immediately 
pricked up his ears, walked up to the vehicle and 
pressed his soft muzzle against his owner's check. It 
was an affecting scene, and the brave young man who 
never quailed at all the horrible mangling be had 
received, was visibly Effected because he could not 
return the caress of his trotter with the pat of the 
hand that the horse evidently expected. 



JULY 29, 1905 1 



H JOTTINGS. |g 



THE RECORDS MADE on the California circuit 
thus far, have attracted the attention of horse- 
men all over the country, and one Eastern turf writer 
remarks that "the California owners who have been 
winning at Los Angeles and Fresno probably now 
wish they had entered on the Grand Circuit." This 
is a recognition of a fact which cannot be disputed, 
that many of the race winners on the Coast this sea- 
son have shown sufficient calibre to warrant the belief 
that they could win in their classes anywhere. No 
pacer in the country has shown four such miles to this 
date as the 2:06 and 2:06} at Los Angeles and two heats 
in 2:05} at Fresno which were paced by Zolock. That 
this son of McKinney could get his share of the money 
in the big ring over East is not for one moment 
doubted by those who have seen him race this year, 
and a record of 2:02 or better is certainly within his 
reach. No stronger finisher ever raced to the wire, 
and he can go as many heats to his limit as the next 
horse. 

While there is nothing but praise to be said of Zo- 
lock, the horse that drove him out in 2:05} the first 
heat at Fresno is also worthy of a few lines of com- 
mendation. This horse was the chestnut gelding 
Edwin S. 2:08, owned by Mr. E. A. Servis of Durham, 
Butte county. In that memorable heat Ed win S. did 
not get off well and was interfered with at the first 
turn, which necessitated his being taken back atd 
around the other horses. He had to take the over- 
land route the first quarter of a mile, but by the time 
the half was reached he was straightened away and 
from the head of the stretch the struggle between 
him and Zolock will long be remembered by those who 
saw it. It was such an exciting finish that the crowd 
in the grand stand rose and cheered the contestants, 
and Edwin was only beaten a head in one of tbeclosest 
and best contests ever seen. His mile was doubtless 
as good or better than 2:05, and many are of the 
opinion it was as good as 2:04 J. It is a great pity the 
fastest class made for pacers at the Santa Rosa meet- 
ing was the 2:09 class, as that barred the entry of 
Edwin S., and he was the one that could doubtless 
have made Zolock lower his Fresno record to win. 



In this connection it will be in order at this time to 
correct a slight mistake in the previous published 
accounts of the breeding of Edwin S. He is by the 
registered stallion Doctor Hicks 23103, son of Durfee 
11256 and Gazelle by Buccaneer. His dam has hereto- 
fore been erroneously given us by La Harpe 2:17}, 
son of Egmont. She was by a horse called La Harpe, 
t is true, but the son of Egmont is not the one. La 
Harpe, sire of the dam of Edwin S , was bred by the 
late Dr. Hicks, and was a bronze bay horse, with two 
iwhite stockings behind, and star, weighed close to 
1200 pounds and stood 10 hands. He was foaled in 
1879, and sired by Fame, a son of Belmont 64, the sire 
of Nutwood. La Harpe's dam was Prairie Bird 2:28}, 
the dam of Prompter, and was by Flaxtail. 



If California had a circuit of eight or ten weeks 
harness racing every summer it would not be a year 
until 2:05 would be equalled or beaten every year in 
the pacing events, and three or four new 2:10 tro'.tiDg 
records would be made annually. This would be of 
vast value to the breeding industry and add many 
dollars to the wealth of the State. Harness 
racing is the sport of the masses of horse owners 
and breeders. In spite of the fact that the 
speculative portion of the community prefers the run- 
ners, harness racing is as popular as ever. Meetings 
are well attended wherever they are given and if 
properly managed do not show a loss. In the Eastern 
and Middle states thousands of harness meetings are 
held annually. Last week's Western Horseman, pub- 
lished in Indianapolis, calls attention to the fact that 
the issue contains the advertisements of over one 
hundred and thirty harness race meetings. The 
popularity of the Grand Circuit is increasing every 
year, and a big profitable pricecan be obtained for a 
good trotter or pacer with race winning speed or first 
class road qualities. People who are always saying 
that harness racing is getting unpopular don't know 
what they are talking about. It is just as popular a 
sport and more so than it ever was. The lack of 
meetings is no evidence of its unpopularity, but only 
evidence that the owners of tracks are not enter prising. 



The opening of the Grand Circuit at Detroit has 
been very successful, and some good racing has been 
done under the every-heat-a-race plan. Up to and 
including Thursday's races thirty-six heats had been 
trotted or paced iu the twelve races decided, and not 
one heat was as slow as 2:15. No less than 26 of these 
heats were in 2:10 or better, the fastest pacing heat 



being Locanda's 2:05 and the fastest trotting heat' 
Dr. Strong's 2:06. The California horses have not 
been taking as many first moneys as usual, which Is 
not surprising to horsemen here on the coast as the 
class of horbes starting at the early meetings this 
year is not quite up to our usual consignment to the 
GraDd Circuit opening. Later in the year we expect 
quite a numberof new fast performers from California 
will be drawing down the big end of many Grand 
Circuit pursee. 

Windsor Results. 



TUESDAY, JUF.Y 18. 

Pacing. 2:19 class, purse $800. 

Walter Direct, b s by Direct Hal (Geers) 1 1 1 

Maud Keswick, b m (James) 2 2 2 

Black Patchen, bg (Hogan) 4 3 3 

F J. Park, s s (Lyon) 3 4 5 

JohnO.,chg (Burns) 5 5 4 

Time— 2:08M, 2:09V4, 2:10^. 

Trotting, 2:20 class, purse $800. 

Clarita W., ch m, by Grattan (Geers) 114 1 

Watson, s g by Hinder Wilkes (Wlokersham) 4 3 12 

Fred Direct, blk g (De Ryder) 2 2 2 4 

Belle Isle, bm (Lyon) 3 4 3 3 

Stewart, ch g (Castle) 5 5 5 dr 

Topsy Simon, blk m (Bedford) dis 

Tlme-2:10!U, 2:12^, 2:12*, 2:15. 

WEDNESDAY, JULY 19. 

Pacing, 2:12 class, purse $800. Four heats Tuesday. 

Josle, br m by Glenelg (Do Ryder) 1 12 3 1 

Irish Jack, br g (Stanley) 5 3 14 2 

Peruna.bg (Murphy) 2 2 3 Ids 

Christina Simmons, blk m (Snyder) 4 4 4 2 ds 

Jim Kyle, bs (Castle) 3 ds 

Tlme-2:09X, 2:10^, 2:13 3 i, 2:15, 2:16. 

Trotting, 2:14 class, purse $800. 

Turley, b g by French Plate (Geers) 1 1 1 

Jim Fenlun, br g (McDermott) 3 2 2 

Silver Ore, gg (Stewart) 6 5 3 

Major Greer, s g (McCarthy) 5 4 4 

Thorn Boy, w g (Patterson) 2 4 dr 

Mamie R., br m (De Ryder) 4 ds 

Time— 2:14^, 2:13%, 2:16. 

Pacing, 2:09 class, purse $800. 

Shylock, b g by Shiloh (McMahon) 1 1 l 

Siein, b g (Geers) 2 8 1 

Geary, ch g (James) 4 2 3 

BenF., b g (DeRyder) 3 4 4 

Time— 2:08 J4, 2:10^, 2:10^. 

Trotting, 2:08 class, purse $800. 

Norman B , blk g by Phallas (McCarthy) 3 2 11 

Direct View, br s (De Ryder* 13 2 2 

Snyder McGregor, chg (Hogan) 4 1 4 

Maxlne.bm (Geers) 2 4 3 

Time— 2:10^, 2:09M, 2:10^, 2:10^. 

THURSDAY, JULY 20. 

Pacing, 2:24 class, purse $800. 

Red Nightingale, br m by Redwing C (Stokes) 113 1 

Sally Pointer, br m (Wheat) 2 2 12 

TommyBurns.bg (McCarthy) 3 3 2 3 

College King, blk s (Anderson) 4 4 4 ds 

Time— "!:10^, 2:102£, 2:13'/ 2 , 2:13*4. 

Trotting, 2:17 class, purse $800. 

Danube, br s by Direcho (DeRyder) 1 1 1 

Miss Rosedale, sr m (Brawley) 4 2 3 

PatT.bg (Patterson) 3 5 2 

Marnut, r g (Brown) 2 3 5 

Choir Boy, grg (Geers) 5 4 4 

Mary Celeste, blk m (Stinson) 6 6 6 

Time-2:15!4, 2:13^, 2:14^- 
Pacing, 2:14 class, purse $800. 

Red Bud. bm by Redwing C (Stokes) 1 1 1 

High Seven, ch g (Stuart) 2 3 4 

RobprtLee.bg (Hoffman) 4 2 3 

Bedford Boy. r g (Brawley) 5 4 2 

Bonnie Wilkes, ch m (Howard) 3 ds 

Time— 2:09a. 2:10, 2:115£. 

FRIDAY, JULY 21. 

Pacing, 2:17 class, purse $800. 

Bolivar, b g by Wayland W , (DeRyder) 4 111 

Paul.bg (Hogan) 14 3 3 

Billy A, bg (Wheat) 3 3 2 2 

Reglna. chmi (Stokes) 2 2 4 4 

Hal Duplex, rh (Brawley) dis 

Time— 2:09M, fclljfi 2:13, 2:13%. 

Pacing, 2:06 class, purse $800. 

Hazel Patch, blk h by Hard Patch (Flack) 4 I 1 

Anldrosis.ch'g (Allen) 1 8 3 

BarronGratton.bg (Geers) 2 2 5 

WlnBeld Stratton, b h (McQuIre) 3 4 2 

Captain Sphinx bg (Saunders) 5 6 4 

William Mc, blk g (Castle) 6 5 6 

Tlme-2:06K, 2:06%, 2:07/,. 

Trotting, 2:1 1 class, purse $800. 

Zephyr, b m by Zombro.; (Geers) 1 1 1 

MackMack.bg (Helman) 2 2 2 

OoldStandard.bg (Castle) 3 8 3 

Flashllghlning, b g (Brown) 4 4 4 

Time-2:12V4. 2:12'/,, 2:12'4. 



Here's a Chance for Rockaway. 

Mr. R. A. Rouso of Danville, Illinois, and his trainer 
Geo. J. Foster, at the Indianapolis track, have 
authorized the statement that they desire to match 
the two-year-old chestnut pacing filly by John R. 
Gentry 2:00J, dam Onoqua 2:08} by Keeler, against 
any pacing two-year-old In tho world, either sex, mile 
heats, best two in three, for $2500 a side, $100o a side 
to go up when match is made, $1000 in thirty days 
thereafter, and $500 the evening before the race, "play 
or pay," from start to finish, the race to tako placo 
over the Columbus or Cincinnati track, at the Grand 
Circuit meeting, or at Lexington or Memphis, during 
the fall trots, the accepting party to have the naming 
of which nf theso tracks. This announcement was 
made in tho last issue of the Western Horseman Here 
is a chance for the California pacer Rockaway that 
took a record of 2:15} at Los Angeles recently to get a 
match, and if it were made considerable California 
money would be put up that be would win. 



Racing at Hilo. 

The Fourth of July was celebrated at Hllo, Hawaii, 
by a good program of racing, and although it rained 
and the track was very muddy the crowd was lertre 
and well pleased with the day's sport. 

The main event on the program, which was a race 
at a mile and a quarter between The FYetter, Bruner 
and Merrills Force, had to be declared off on account 
of an accident to The Fretter, whose leg was injured 
so that he was very lame. The only harness event 
was won by the old pacer John D. that was racing 
ten or twelve years ago at San Jose under the name of 
Tony. The summary of tho races is as follows: 

One mile-Egyptian PriDcess won, G. H. R. second, 
Merrills Force third. Time, 1:54 

Six furlongs— Antidote wod, If Not second, Why 
Not third. Time, 1:35. 

Four and a half furlongs— Keanakolu won, Nigger 
second, Sweet Pea third. Time, :59J. 

Four furlongs— G H. R. won, Antidote second. If 
Not third. Time, :55J. 

One mile— Egyptian PriDcess won, Bruner second, 
Dixie Land third. Time, 1:53. 

Five and a half furlongs— Bruner won, Egyptian 
Princess second, So So third. Time. 1:22$. 

Pacing, best two In three— John D. (formerly Tony) 
won first and third heats. Second heat was a dead 
heat between John D. and Ned McGowan. Nazon 
was distanced in first heat. Time— 2:47, 2:58, 2:55. 



Racing at Wailuku, Maui. 

A very successful Fourth of July meeliDg was held 
at Wailuku which is on Maui, ono of the Hawaiian 
Islands. The results were: 

Half-mile dash— Racery, won; Geralcine >S., second. 

Trotting and pacing, free-for-all— Cyclone, won. 

Mile dash— Racine Murphy, won; Notice, second. 

Trotting and pacing, 2:15 class— Denny Healey, won. 

Trotting and pacing, three-minute class— Silvertop, 
won. 

Gentlemen's driving race— Abdine, won; McKinley, 
second . 

Six furlongs dash— Racery, won; Racine Murphy 
second; Notice, third. 

There will be another meeting at Wailuku on 
August 12. 

George S. McKenzie, owner of Nullah, Oriana and 
others, is there on a visit and may buy Bruiier and 
bring him to the Coast. Tho horse was shipped there 
with a consignment of hack horses and has won races 
at all kinds of distances. 



Third Contest for the Cleveland Cup. 



The Directors of the League of Amateur Driving 
Clubs have awarded to the Gentlemen's Driving Club 
of Cleveland the days of August 31st and September 
1st on which to hold their Inter-City Matinee. At 
this time the third contest for the $5000 Cleveland 
Gold Cup (Amateur Drivers' Challenge Trophy), will 
be held. The Cleveland Club has won this cup twice 
and should they >vin it again this year it will pass into 
their possession permanently. Any amateur club of 
recognized standing (not of necessity a member of the 
League) may challenge for this cup, and as many 
horses belonging to one club as is desired are eligible 
to start, though no owner may start moro than one 
horse. Horses to be eligible to start for this cup must 
have started in at least two regular matinees during 
the year, and must not have participated in public 
racing for money for thirty days prior to the holding 
of this race. Entries for this cup race will close Mon- 
day, August 31st. The Cleveland Club will also offer 
a cup for free-to-all pacers, entries for which will close 
on the same day. There are no conditions governing 
entries for this cup except that it is open only for 
horses owned by members of those clubs in member- 
ship with the League of Amateur Driving Clubs. 



That wonderful little mare, The Broncho, paced 
two great heats over the Chicago half-mile track, 
July 15. There was but ono other starter in tho free- 
for-all pace, the mare Citation. Owing to Citation 
being hitched too close to the sulky, which made her 
hit her hocks, she could not show any speed, so The 
Broncho won tho first heat In a jog In 2:20J. Citation 
was hooked up all right In the next heat and 
Tho Broncho had to break tho Illinois record to win. 
She paced the heat in 2:06ij and made the mile in the 
third heat In the same time. No other horse ever 
paced so fast over an Illinois half-mile track In a race, 
and Hetty G. Is the only mare that has beaten the 
time on a track of that description. 



Jackson's Napa Soda is sold in every city, town 
and hamlet in the State. 



8 



[July 29, 1905 



ROD, GUN AND KENNEL. 



Conducted by J. X. De WITT. 



Coming Events. 

Bod. 

April 1-Sept. 10. Oct. 18-Feb. 1— Open season (or taking steel- 
lead in tidewater. 
April 1-Sept. 15— Closed season for lobsters and crawfish. 
April 1-Nov. 1— Triut season open. 
June 1-Jan. 1— Open season for black bass. 

July 29— Saturday Fly-Casting Contest No. 9. Stow lake, 2:30 
p. in. 

July 30— Sunday Fly Casting Contest No. 9. Stow lake, 10 a. m. 
Sept. 10-Oct. 16— Close season In tidewater for steelhead. 
Sept. 10-Oct. 16— Close season for catching salmon. 
Oct. 16-Nov. 15— Close season for taking salmon above tide, 
water. 

Nov. 1-Sept. 1— Open season for crabs. 

Nov. 15-Sept. 10— Season open for taking salmon above tide 
water. 

Uun. 

Feb. 15-Sept. 1— Closed season for mountain quail, grouse and 
(age hen. 

Feb. 15-Oct. 15— Closed season for quail, ducks, etc. 
April 1-Oct. 15— Close season for English snipe. 
July 1-Feb. 15— Dove season open. 

July 30— Santa Rosa Gun Club. Blue rock open-to-all tourna- 
ment. 

July 3»-Millwood Gun Club. Blue rocks. Mill Valley 
Junction. 
Aug 1-Oct. 15— Deer season open. 

Aug. Sebastopol Gun Club. Blue rocks. Every Sunday. 

Aug 6— Golden Gate Gun Club. Blue rocks. Ingleside. 
Aug. 6— Blue Rook Gun Club High-street grounds, Alameda. 
Aug, 6, 20— Petaluma Gun Club. Blue rocks. Kenllworth Park. 
Aug. 6, 20-Mount View Gun Club. Blue rocks. Mount View. 
Cal. 

Aug. 13— California Wing Club. Live pigeons. Ingleside. 
Aug. 13, 27— Fish and Game Gun Club Blue rocks. San Jose. 
Aug. 13, 27— Santa Rosa Gun Club. Blue rocks. 
Aug. 13, 27-Vallejo Gun Club. Blue rocks. Flosden Station. 
Aug. 20— Union Gun Club. Blue rocks. Ingleside. 
Aug. 29 , 30— Interstate Association tournament. Blue rocks 
Denver, Col. 

Sept, 9, 10— Empire Gun Club. Merchandise shoot. Blue rocks 
Alameda Junction. 

Sept. 12, 13, 14— Interstate shoot. Blue rocks. Ingleside. Elmer 
E. Stianer, Manager. Pacific Coast Handicap under auspices of 
S. F. Trapshooting Ass'n., A. M. Shields, Secretary 

Sept. 30-Oct. 1— Two-day blue rock tournament. Biggs, Butte 
oounty. H. Haselbusch, manager. 

Sept. 30-Oct. 1— Biggs Gun Club. Two-day blue rock tournament. 
Biggs, Cal. 

Bench Shows. 

Aug. 15, 18— Orange County Agricultural Society. Middletown, 
N. Y. D. A. Morrison, Secretary. 

Aug. 23. 25— Rockland County Industrial Association. Bench 
show in New York City. A. A. Vanderbllt, Secretary. 

Aug. 31-Sept 2— Newport Dog Show. Newport, R. I. Francis M. 
Ware, Secretary 

Stpt. t— San Mateo Kennel Club. 2nd annual show. One day. 

Sept. Santa Cruz Kennel Club. Inaugural show. Santa 

Cruz, Cal. 

Oct. Stockton Kennel Club. F. A. Qeisea, Secretary, Stock" 

ton, Cal. 

Sept. 16— Englewood Kennel Club. Engltwood. N. J. M.W 
Robinson, Secretary. 

Sept. 27, 28— Valley Fair Kennel Club. Brattleboro, Vt. 
Howard C. Rioe, Secretary. 

Oct. 3, 6— Danbury Agricultural Society, Danbury, Conn. G. 
M. Rundle, Secretary. Jas. Mortimer, Superintendent. 

Nov. 15, 18— Boston Terrier Club Specialty Club. Boston. F. 

H. Osgood, Seoretary. 

Nov. 28-Djo. 1— Philadelphia Dog Show Association. Phila- 
delphia. J. Sergeant Price, Secretary. 

1906. 

Feb. 12, 15— Westminster Kennel Club. New York. Robt. V. 
McKim, Secretary. 

Feb. 20, 23— New England Kennel Club Boston. Wm. B. 
Emery, Secretary. 

March 7, 10— Duquesne Kennel Club. Pittsburg, Pa. F. S. 
Steadman, Secretary. 

Field Trials. 

Aug. 15— Iowa Field Trial Club. Geo. C. Cooper, Secretary, P. 
O. Box 55, Des Moines, la. 

Aug. 23— North Dakota Field Trial Club. Inaugural trials 
Grand Forks, N. D A. E. Palmer, Secretary, Grand Forks, N. D. 

Sept 4— Nebraska Field Trial Association. 4th annual trials. 
O'Neill, Neb. H. H. McCarthy, Secretary, O'Neill, Neb. 

Sept. 6— Manitoba Field Trial Club, 19th annual trials. La 
Salle, Man. Eric Hamber, Secretary, Winnepeg Man. 

Sept. 21— British Columbia Field Trial Club, 3d annual trials. 

I. miner, B C. H. S Rolston, Secretary, Vancouver. B. C. 

Oct. 12— Pacific Northwest Field Trial Club. La Conner Flats, 
Wash. Chas. L. Lundy, Secretary, Seattle, Wash. 

Oot. 23— Ohio Field Trial Association. Washington Court House, 
O. C. T. Phillips, Secretary, Columbus, O. 

Oct. 30— American Field Futurity Stake. For Pointers and 
Setters whelped on or after January I, 1904, whose dams have 
been duly qualifled. Robinson, 111., entries closed July 1. Address 
Am. Field Publishing Co., Chicago. 

Oct. 31— Connecticut Field Trial Club. Hampton, Conn, F. M. 
Chapin, Secretary, Pine Meadow, Conn. 

Nov. 6— Independent Field Trial Association. Hutsonville, 111. 
S. H. Socwell, Secretary, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Nov. 13— Illinois Field Trial Association. Robinson, 111. Wm. 
R. Green, Secretary, Marshall, 111. 

Nov Indiana Field Trial Club, (Week following Illinois 

Champion Stake). C. F. Young, Secretary, Clay City, Ind. 

Nov. 21— International Field Trial Club. Ruthven, Ont. W. B. 
W»lls, Honorary Seoretary, Chatham, Ont. 

Dec. 2— Continental Field Trial Club, 11th annual trials, . 

John White, Secretary, Hempstead, Long Island. 

Deo. Pointer Club of America (following the Continental 

trials). Barber, N. C. C. F. Lewis, Seoretary, 126 Maiden Lane, 
New Yerk. 

Deo. 12— Eastern Field Trial Club Waynesboro, Ga. S. O. 
Bradley, Secretary, Fa.irfleld, Conn. 

ieoe. 

Jan Paoiflc Coast Field Trials Club, 23d annual trials. 

Bakersfield, Cal. Albert Betz, Seoretary, 201 Parrott Bldg., San 
Franolsco. 



Pertinent Facts About Salmon. 



The board of supervisors of San Benito county have 
passed Ordinance 87, repealing all game laws hereto- 
Fore enacted in the county. This brings the county 
under the operation of the State law. The open sea* 
son on deer In this district was, previous to the passing 
of the repealing law, from August 1 to October 1. 



[By J. P. Babcock.] 

The sockeye salmon which are captured in Puget 
Sound are enroute from the Pacific ocean to the'head- 
waters of the Praser river, and do not enter any 
stream in the state of Washington which is tributary 
to Puget Sound, save those which enter the Skagit 
river, and those which enter that river appear to run 
earlier and independently of those that run to the 
Fraser river. 

The sockeye which attempt to run through Puget 
Sound were propagated in the Praser river, and are 
seeking to return for the purpose of propagation. 
They do not breed or feed in Puget Sound. 

The run of sockeye of a given year in Puget Sound 
depends primarily upon the number which spawn in 
the Praser river the preceding year. For the past 
three years the catch shows a steady and alarming 
decrease. This year's catch was the smallest in the 
history of the industry. The decrease Is due to a 
failure of the fish to run as abundantly as formerly, 
and not to any fault or method or lack of effort to 
capture them. 

The demand and the price paid for the fish during 
the past two years has been greater than ever before. 

Every channel of Puget Sound through which the 
sockeye seek entrance to the Fraser river is lined 
with stationary traps. Every known contrivance by 
which salmon can be taken is permitted and used in 
Puget Sound. There are no limitations as to time or 
method in their taking. There are no closed seasons 
during any part of the time the sockeye run. No law 
has ever been passed by the state of Washington for 
the protection of the sockeye in Puget Sound. A 
greater proportion of the total number of sockeye 
which seek entrance to the Fraser river through 
Puget Sound are captured now than formerly. Those 
that do escape p ss into British waters, and cannot 
enter the Fraser river without doing so. 

In British waters they cannot be fished for previous 
to July 1. The law prohibits their being caught 
there between 6 a. m. of every Saturday and 6 p. m. of 
the following day, and during the past year they could 
not be fished for from August 25 to September 15. 
Traps have never been used in British waters tribu- 
tary to Puget Sound for the capture of sockeye; only 
gill nets are permitted to be used. No traps, with 
the exception of those in Boundary Bay, have been 
permitted in British waters until this year, when two 
traps were placed on the south coast of Vancouver 
Island in the Straits of Juan de Fuca, and these traps 
could not and did not catch any fish which escaped 
capture in Puget Sound. 

My inspection of the entire spawning grounds of the 
Praser watershed in each of the last four seasons has 
been thorough and complete. In 1901, the year of the 
big run, great numbers of sockeye spawned in every 
section, with the exception of Quesnel Lake district, 
from which a large number were excluded by a dam, 
at the outlet of the lake, which was then provided 
with an effective fishway. In each of the last three 
years fully 75 per cent of the same spawning beds were 
almost barren of adult sockeye, and the remaining 
sections were not abundently covered with them, and 
their numbers have been noticeably less each year. 
There has not been sufficient ova deposited in the 
Fraser river during the past three years to produce a 
number equal to the runs of those years. 

There were two hatcheries located on the Fraser 
river prior to 1901 that had an egg capacity of twenty 
millions, and they were filled with eggs that year. In 
1902, through a failure of the fish to reach the spawn- 
ing grounds, the total collection of eggs for these two 
hatcheries was less than fourteen million. 

In 1903 an additional hatchery of forty million egg 
capacity was constructed on the Fraser river, and yet 
the total number of eggs obtained at all three hatch- 
eries that year was less than fourteen million. 

This past year, although a new hatchery was 
established and operated, the total collection of eggs 
was 25 per cent less than last year. 

There are hatcheries on the Fraser river that have 
a capacity of ninety millions of eggs. The failure to 
fill them was due to a scarcity of fish on the spawning 
beds, and not to any lack of intelligent effort to obtain 
eggs. 

My field investigations on the Fraser river have 
satisfied me that an abundanoe of young sockeye, the 
product of the spawning of 1901, passed down the 
river to the sea in 1902 and 1903, and that the past 
season the same fyke nets which I placed in the river 
to trace this movement failed to catch enough young 
salmon to feed a bluejay, which I take to indicate that 
there was little or no seaward migration this year. 
The fyke nets which I had used In the Wannack river, 
at the head of Rivers Inlet, this year were set in the 
same manner as those in the Fraser river, and caught 
hundreds of youngsockeyeday after day for the three 
months they were used. 

Thedecrease in theoatoh of sockeye In Puget Sound 
and the empty spawning grounds Is attributable to 
excessive fishing in the past and at present. The 
decrease cannot be explained in any other reasonable 
way. The continuance of the present methods and 
seasons in Puget Sound and British Columbia will re- 
buH in the extermination of the sookeye in the Fraser 



river. It is not at all probable that the number of 
fish would have become so depleted if the State of 
Washington had given them the same measure of 
protection as that was afforded them in British waters. 
Many of the leading cannery companies on both sides 
of the line would not now be in the hands of receivers 
if the salmon had been better protected. All the 
canneries will be closed and the fishermen driven from 
these waters in the near future if the present excesses 
are continued. Such measures of protection as would 
have permitted an abundant number of sockeye to 
reach the spawning grounds of the Fraser before their 
numbers had become so depleted, will not be adequate 
now. 

A sufficient number of sockeye reached the spawn- 
ing grounds in 1901, notwithstanding the existing 
regulations in British Columbia, and without any 
regulation in Washington, because the fish ran in 
such vast numbers that thecanneries could not handle 
all the fish that the traps and the fishermen caught in 
a few hours each day. Consequently, the channels of 
the Sound and the river were not blocked all the time. 
The canneries exhausted their supply of cans before 
the run was over, which put a stop to fishing, ard 
permitted all the salmon that came afterwards to 
ascend the river. The reverse of these conditions 
have obtained for the last three years, which proves 
that regulations that are adequate for the year of the 
"big run" will be in: dequate in the three following 
years of poor runs. 

It is a matter of history that excessive fishing and 
inadequate regulations reduce the run of salmon in 
the Sacramento river. The canners and fisherman of 
the Sacramento by their protests and influence pre- 
vented the passage of adequate protective laws as 
long as they could make a living by catching the 
salmon in that river. The salmon were finally so 
nearly exterminated in the Sacramento river that the 
canneries were closed and a majority of the fishermen 
were driven from the river; and from excessive fishing 
the hatcheries were unable to obtain sufficient eggs 
and were closed for four years. An efficient protective 
law was passed in 1894 which closed the river to fish- 
ing duriDg the height of the run, and hatching opera- 
tions were resumed. The hatcheries produced fully 
80 per cent more fry from the eggs obtained than 
would have resulted from natural methods of propa- 
gation. The run of salmon since the passage of wise 
laws and the resumption of hatchery operations, has 
gradually increased, slowly at first, but steadily, year 
after year, and is now as great as it ever was. 
Hatchery after hatchery has been established since 
1894 and this year they were unable to handle all the 
eggs obtainable. 

Mr. Alexander T. Vogelsang, a prominent attorney 
of San Francisco, who was for six years the president 
of the Board of Fish Commissioners of the State of 
California, wrote me on the 23d of last November con- 
cerning the situation on the Sacramento river as 
follows: 

"I have read in the Pacific Fisherman for November 
the statement of the hatchery affair3 under your 
jurisdiction on the Fraser river, and am sorry to learn 
that the results at the spawn-collecting stations are so 
meagre. I notice, too, that the take of eggs on the 
Columbia river is also very small. Of course, you 
can't obtain eggsif the fish are not permitted to ascend 
the river. Things are very different in California. 
Davis and Lambson think that never in the history of 
the white occupation of the State has the run of 
salmon been so large as this year. It has increased 
regularly every year for the past ten. I have just 
seen a letter from Lambson to the board in which he 
states he is forced to close the Mill Creek station on 
account of lack of room to hold eggs. He has taken 
thirty million there, and says he could have taken 
sixty million if he had ample accommodations. 

The take of eggs at Battle Creek hatchery has 
passed the thirty million mark, and they will reach, 
if they do not pass, your own mark of forty-eight 
million, at that station. Although the capacity of 
the Sissou hatchery has been greatly enlarged, Mr. 
Shelby fears he cannot handle all the eggs obtainable. 
Baird hatchery has taken over eleven millions and 
was closed for lack of room. Contrast these conditions 
with the years when the latter was the only hatchery 
on the river and was closed for four years for lack of 
eggs. Undoubtedly this is the result of our pfforts. 
Salmon are being shipped to the markets today from 
Clarksburg, and they are spawning on every riffle 
from Chico north. No one has ever seen them so 
large or so numerous as now. Breeding from large 
males only has wrought the former condition as we 
expected. The Oregon, Washington and British 
Columbia people should 'get next to themselves' and 
their fish, or else there will be a period of ten years or 
more of inactivity in their salmon business, as there 
was in ours." 

These facts are worthy the careful consideration of 
every one interested in the salmon industry. What 
was accomplished on the Sacramento river can be 
duplicated on the Fraser by the adoption of the same 
means there adopted, to-wit, adequate protection of 
the fish on the fishing and spawning grounds, and 
honest and intelligent operation of the hatcheries, 
And it cannot be accomplished in any other way, and 
the sooner the fishery interests appreciate this the 
sooner they will cease operating at a loss, and place 
the industry on a profitable and lasting basis. 



The Sacramento Board of Supervisors have in- 
structed Game Warden Neale to have the fish in the 
Schulmeyer pond, near the City Cemetery, seined out 
and placed In the river. The pond is full of black bass 
that are dying by thousands. It will cost more to 
bury the dead fish than It will to have them removed 
and placed in the Sacramento river. These bass, and 
plentiful and large they are, were left in the pond 
when the water lowered and could not get back to the 
stream, 

Strike!— if they don't give youJackson 8 Napa Soda 
wber you ask for It, 



July 29, 1906 J 



AT THE TRAPS. 



The Millwood Gun Club monthly shoot is the pro- 
gram tomorrow for local shotgun devotees. 



A big shoot i3 on for Santa Rosa tomorrow. Several 
local sportsmen will attend. The Napa, Woodland, 
St. Helena, Sebastopol, Petaluma and Vallejo repre- 
sentation will be a large one. Among the features of 
the day will be an exhibition of rifle marksmanship by 
Frank L. Carter one of the most skillful rifle experts 
in the country. 

The Lincoln Gun Club live bird shoot and picnic at 
Reclamation on August 24th will be well worth while 
attending. The main pigeon events will be a 12 bird 
shoot, entrance $1.75, the price of the birds; side pool 
optional, and ateam shoot, 12 birds per man, entrance 
$1.75. Side pool. 

The shoot will be under the supervision of Edgar L. 
Forster and this is a guarantee that the function will 
be a success in every way. Among other things there 
will be a good lunch spread, enough for all and free 
of expense to those present. The 8 or 9:30 a. m. boat 
via. Ca). Northwestern Railway is the route. Teams 
will meat the shooters at Reclamation station. 



An open to all blue rock tournament is scheduled 
for August 13th at the Hunter's Inn, San Leandro. 

The majority of shooters will take the 9:40 Oakland 
boat, thence by electric cars to San Leandro where 
Mine Host Ravekes will meet the sportsmen and con- 
vey them to and from the grounds, free of charge. 
A good shooting program has been arranged. 

A "clam bake," "barbecue" and "bull's head" 
breakfast is the appetizing combination which will 
be provided for the inner man and will be served free 
of charge to the visiting shooters and their friends. 
The Hunter's Inn is famous for its good cheer and 
hospitality and will on this occaaien be well attended 
by a large contingent of sportsmen. 



The inter-club shoot at Flosden Station, on the 
Vallejo Gun Club grounds, was attended by a large 
turnout of shooters, at least 75 guns taking part in 
the various events. San Francisco's representation 
was strong: being about 50% of the shooters partici- 
pating. 

The main event, a five man team shoot, brought ten 
teams on the firing line — Golden Gate, Vallejo, two 
teams each; Union, three teams; Empire, Santa Rosa 
and Napa Gun Clubs, one team each. The race was 
unfortunately delayed until rather late in the day. 
the electric car service being to blame for the delay. 
The result of the shoot was a tie between Golden Gate 
No. 1 and the Santa Rosa team— each squad scoring 
a total of 113, losing but 12 targets, a very clever show- 
ing. The Santa Rosa club shooters tied as strong a 
squad as could be sent to the traps in this city. It 
looked at one time as if the double G men would win. 

Every man in the squad broke his last bird but 
Golcher, who dusted his 25th target, "Wilson" closed 
with a break. It was clearly a case of shooter's luck, 
the dusted target getting through the pattern The 
Santa Rosa team shot remarkably well, Hesse, Guilt- 
nan and Monroe are a hard trio to beat. Frank L. 
Carter shot in good form losing but one bird, the 
ninth. "Ttep" Lewis is coming to the front rapidly, 
his string of 20 targets being well centered. The tie 
shoot off will probably take place some time in 
September. 

Vallejo team No. 1 is a strong shooting squad and 
were but four birds behind the winning teams. The 
winners in the side pool, high guns, one money for 
each three entries were: "Wilson," Ed Schultz, W. 
Chappell, C. Drake, F. W. Hesse, Jr., and E. Klevesahl. 
The winners in a 25 target race were: George Sylves- 
ter, Len Hawxhurst and C. T. Mitchell. 

Too much cannot be said in Draise of the Vallejo 
Gun Club members who strove in many ways to 
entertain and look after the many visitors, and their 
ladies, from San Francisco, Napa, Santa Rosa, St. 
Helena, Woodland and other points. The scores in 
the team event follow: 

Five-man team trophy race, 25 targets per man; $1 
entrance per man, side pool optional; $1 entrance, 
high guns; one money for each three entries; 10 yards: 

Santa Rosa- 



Hesse Jr Hill 11011 11111 11111 01111-33 

Quiltnan 11110 11111 11111 11011 11111—23 

Monroe nioi urn 10m mil linr-i 23 

Carter, F. L Ill II 11101 Mill Mill 11111—24 

Lewis, T. L , 1 II 10 101 1 1 10011 11111 1 1 101 — 20 

Total 118 

Qolden Gate No. 1— , 

Peudner, M. 11110 1 1 111 11010 1 1 1 1 1 11111-22 

Schultz, E II 110 11111 101 II lllll Illll- 23 

Forster 11110 lllll 101 II lllll 11111—23 

Golcher, W. J 01111 lllll lllll 1 1 1 10 11010— 21 

"Wilson" 11101 mil nm urn mil— 24 

Total : 118 

Vallejo No. 1— 

Clark iooi i oono nm urn ioioi- ih 

Chappell lllll lOlld lllll mil 11111—23 

O'Hara lllll 001 II mil mil lllll— 23 

Brown lllll 11011 lllll 10111 11011—22 

Drake, C lllll 01111 11011 lllll lllll— 23 

Total 109 

Union No. 1— 

Daniels 11011 11011 1 1 101 mil nm— 32 

Klevesahl, E lllll lllll 11111 11110 11101- 23 

Iverson lllll lllll 10110 11010 11110— si 

Sylvester. 11111 11101 Hill 00101 OHIO- 10 

Hawxhurst 11011 lllll 11110 lllll lllll- 23 

Total 108 

Union No. 3— 

Barber H011 10011 01010 lllll 11111— 10 

Flnocohlo, P 11110 lllll 01111 lllll 11111—23 

Mitohell 11100 0IQ11 Jllll 11010 lllll— 10 

Hoyt lllll OlOll Hill 01111 11110— 31 

Maiteraon 11101 10001 01101 OHIO 11001— • IS 

Total ~91 



Vallejo No. 2— 

Beveridge, D :. OHIO lllll 11011 01111 11011— 20 

Morgan 11110 lllll OHIO 11110 lllll— 2\ 

Sbouse noil lino lioio oilll lini—20 

Co . fort 10010 10111 10111 11011 11101— 18 

Burnett 01001 10101 01111 lllll 11110— 18 

Total 97 

Union No. 2— 

Jacobsen lllll 11010 mil 11011 10101—20 

Knlck 01111 11110 10000 01110 lllll— 17 

Sohneider 11110 11110 lllll 01101 lllll— 21 

Burfeind 10111 01101 IOI01 mno mil— 17 

Klevesahl, H 01 1 1 1 lllll 11010 llllOOOlll— 19 

Total 94 

Empire— 

Cullen lllll 00110 01100 lllll OHIO— 17 

Allen 11101 00010 lllll 11010 11011— 17 

Webb 10111 lllll 101 1 1 lllll 00101— 20 

Janssen 11011 11100 dim 01111 lllll— 20 

Houpt 11100 11101 lllll 11101 OHIO— 111 

Total 93 

Golden Gate No. 2— 

Nauman 10101 lllll lllll 01011 11110- 20 

Murdock lllll 001 1 1 IOIOI 11101 01101— 18 

Watties 01010 01001 01001 oonil null— 12 

Harpbam lllll 11011 1 101 1 01111 11011— 21 

Harvey 11110 01111 11011 OHIO 01111— 19 

Total 90 

Napa— 

Reams 11 11(1 11110 10101 01001 lllll— 18 

Mayneld OlOll 10011 oiiln mil linoi— 17 

Mann 10011 11110 10111 01001 ill 10 — - 17 

Robrer, Dr lllll 11011 1 1 100 01 1 1 1 11)101— 19 

Doherty, Dr 11110 OdldO 00001 11110 10110— 13 

Total 84 



Merchandise race, 25 targets, $1 entrance— G. Syl- 
vester 23, L. Hawxhurst 22, C. T. Mitchell 21, M. O. 
Feudner 22, J. V. O'Hara 22, W. Chappell 22, M. A. 
Clark 21, W. Janssen 21, C. Burfeind 21, T.L.Lewis 
20, D. Daniels 20, F. L. Carter 20, H. P. Jacobsen 19, 
S. Mayneld 19, Magistrini 19, W. J. Golcher 19, 
Beveridge 19, Morgan 19, Rooney 19, Dr. Rohner 19, 
C. Reams 18, "Togo" Hirschle 18, P. Magistrini 17, 
A. M. Shields 17, Rose 16, J. W. Elias 13, B. Patrick 9. 



Eureka Gun Club shooters participated in the 
regular club shoot July 16th. W. Parker and H. 
Kelly, 21 out of 25 each, tied in the club race for the 
diamond medal. Kelly won on the shoot off. Parker 
has won the medal twice, another win and the prize 
becomes his permanent property. Dr. Dungan won 
the second class gold medal and Henry Jones was the 
winner of the leather medal. 

The scores made were as follows: Buhne 17, Parrott 
19, Dungan 18, Clancey 12, F. Parker 18, W. Parker 
21, H. Kelly 21, Jones 9, Loufborrow 17, Clanton 17. 



The Napa Gun Club initial blue rock 6hoot took 
place on the 16th inst. The meet was well attended, 
among the visitors being fifteen members of the 
Vallejo Gun Club. The East Napa grounds are 
excellently located and conveniently fitted up. The 
Vallejoites Chappell, O'Hara, Beveridge and R. Coe 
and Dr. Doberty, S. May field, C. Reams and Dr. Stice 
of Napa annexed the principal honors. Nearly 3000 
targets were trapped The scores were the following: 

Event 1, 25 targets— Chappell 20, O'Hara 17, Hir- 
schle 22, Clark 24, S. Mayfield 16, Doherty 16. 

Event 2, 10 targets— R. Coe 6, Rose 4, L. Shouso 4, 
Magistrini 6, Barnhardt 6, Doherty 7, Elias 6, Rogers 

5, Reams 6, Litz 7. O'Hara 9. 

Event 3, 25 targets — Chappell 13, Graig 12, S. May- 
field 15, Clarke 23. N. Coombs 8, Reams 12, Beve- 
ridge 19. 

Event 4, 25 targets— Hirschle 22, O'Hara 16, Chap- 
pell 18, Clark 16, S. May field 19, Doherty 14, Roams 14. 

Event 5, 20 targets— Shouse 14 Hirschle 13, Ellas 12, 
Rogers 13, Coe 13, O'Hara 14, Mayfield 14, Polski 0, 
Reams 16, N. Coombs 7, Magistrini 17, Amstutz 13. 

Event 6, 20 targets — Shouse 13, Hirschle 17, Elias 

6, Rogers 10, Graig 11, Magistrini 10, Coe 13, Comfort 

12, Amstutz 7, Reams 11, S. Mayfield 16, Doherty 12. 
Event 7, 25 targets— Chappeil 21, Beveridge 20, 

Burnett 13, Mayfield 20, Reams 14, Doherty 13. 

Event 8, 25 targets — Reams 10, Beveridge 13, May- 
field 17, Chappell 18, Comfort 11, C. Magistrini 17. 

Event 9, 25 targets— Elias 7, Shouse 13, Barnhardt 

13, Clark 19, Chappell 20, Doherty 15, Coe 16, O'Hara 
21, Mayfield 19, Reams 22, Rogers 13. 

Event 10, Team shoot, 25 targets per man — Napa 
team— Captain S. Mayfield 18, O Hara 20, Reams 17, 
Coe 17, Valencia 14, F. Barnhardt 13, Rogers 15, Rose 

14, I. Mayfield 6. Total 134. 

Vallejo team — Captain Chappell 20, Clark 20, Beve- 
ridge 21, Magistrini 22, L. Shouse 17, Elias 17, Litz 13, 
Polski 4, Stice 12. Total 146 



The sport of trap shooting, we are pleased to note, 
is being revived in Stockton, whero the the traps had 
become rusted after boing unused for several seasons. 
The Stockton club for a long period had been a promi- 
nent organization at many tournaments. Unless we 
are greatly mistaken tho tournament held at Stockton 
In 1897 is the record gathering of Coast trap shooters. 

On the 16th Inst, the club's first live bird shoot for 
this season took place. A number of the old timers 
were on hand and had their "shooting eye" In good 
form. 

In the preliminary blue rock events "Charlie" 
Merrill was high gun. 

The live bird races were all six bird events, $2 
entrance, high guns, two moneys, 60% and 40%. Ties 
divided. The scores were: 

First race— Johnson 0, Ellis 6, DentonI 4, F. Merrill 
4, Fuller 5. 

Seoond race— Johnson 6. Ellis 5, F. Merrill 6, Lon- 
jers 5, Clark 4. 

Third race— Johnson 4, F. Merrill 6, Lonjers 6, 
Ellis 6, Clark 2. 

Fourth race— John 6, Lonjers 4, F. Merrill 6, Ellis 
6, Ralph 5. 

Fifth race— Johnson 6, Lonjers 5, F. Merrill 6, 
Ellis 6. 

Sixth race— Ellis 6, F. Merrill 4, Johnson 4. 



WITH THE ANGLERS. 



GREKKS WERE EXPERT ANGLERS. 

Probably few fishermen are aware that fly-fishing 
dates back to classic times. A minute description of 
the artificial fly as used by Macedonian anglers Is 
given by Aellan, a Greek writer of the third century 
A. D., as follows; 

"Between Berea and Thessalonica there flows a 
river, Astraeus by name, and there are in it fishes of 
a spotted color, but by whut name people of thoso 
parts call them it is better to ask Macedonians At 
any rate these fish live upon the native flies which fall 
into the river and are like no flies of any other part- 
one would neither call them wasplike in appearance,' 
nor would one reply to a question that this creature Is 
formed like what we call the bumble bees, nor yet like 
the honey bees themselves. It has really the proper 
fashion of each of the above. In audacity It is like 
the fly, in size it might be called a bumble bee, in 
color it rivals the wasp and it buzzes like the honev 
bees. All common creatures of this sort are called 
horse tails. These pitch upon the stream to seek tho 
food they effect, but cannot help being seen by the 
fish which swim underniath. 

"So whenever one of them sees the lly floating he 
comes softly, swimming under tho water, afraid of dis- 
turbing the surface and so scaring away bis game. 
Then he comes near the shady side of the fly, gapes 
and sucks him in, just like a wolf snatching a sheep 
from the fold or an eagle % goose from the yard. This 
done, he disappears beneath the ripple. The fisher- 
men understand these maneuvers, but they do not 
make any use of these flies for a bait for the fish, for 
If the human hand lays hold of them they lose their 
natural color, their wings fray and they become un- 
eatable to the fish. So for this reason they make no 
use of them, disliking tbem because their nature .for- 
bids theircapture. 

"So with angling craftthey outwit the fish, devising 
a sort of lure against them. They lap a lock of 
reddish wool around the hook, and to the wool two 
cock's feathers which grow under the wattles, and 
are brought to the proper color with wax. The rod 
is from 6 to 10 feet long and the horsehair line has the 
same length. They lower the lure. The fish is 
attracted by the color, excited, draws close and, judg- 
ing from its beautiful appearance that it will obtain a 
marvelous banquet, forthwith opens its mouth, but is 
caught by the hook, and bitter indeed is the feast it 
has, inasmuch as it is captured." 



SIERRA TROIJTING. 

A trip to the Sierra lake region at this time of the 
year is full of most enjoyable angliDg possibilities ac- 
cording to Mr. Al M. Cumming, who recently returned 
from that almost enchanted region after a visit of 
nearly four weeks during which trip he was ac- 
companied by Mrs. Cumming. 

Leaving this city on Juno 2lst, they went first to 
Webber lake. From there trips were made to Fordyce 
lake, White Rock, Jackson and Webber creeks. In 
all of these waters the fishing was first class. The 
killing lures were: black bodied royal coachman, royal 
coachman, March brown, brown hackle, grizzly king, 
black and red ants, tied on Nos. 8 and lOsproats. The 
spoon for that country is the brass and silver La 
Forge No. 1. 

Recent reports are that the fish are taking the fly 
in Webber lake, Fordyce and White Rock creeks in 
fine style. Many large Loch Leven trout have been 
taken in Webber lake this season. These fish have 
to be worked for, however, for it is hard to get tbem 
to notice the usual lures, there being a most plentiful 
supply of minnow feed for the big trout in the lake. 

From the Webber lake region the two anglers 
journeyed to Bassett's. Among the guests at the 
latter place they met Prof. Flagg, of Berkeley, Mr, 
Flagg, Sr., Fred W. Koch and wife. From Bassett's 
they fished tho north fork of the Yuba, Chapman, 
Lincoln, Packer and Salmon creeks, Upper Sardine 
lake, the three Salmon lakes, the three Bear lakes 
and Long lake, first class fly-fishing for rainbow trout 
was found everywhere. The fishing at and about 
Bassett's will continue good until ice gathers in the 
early Sierra winter. 

In 20 days' fishing, Mr. Cumming missed the limit 
but twice, 20 boxes of fine trout sent out to friends 
attested the sport to be found with rod and line in 
in this inviting mountain region. 

Among other things Mr. Cummings noted that the 
mountain quail shooting season in that region should 
oe excellent this year. A light winter was favorable 
to the breeding season and tho birds were enabled to 
go to the higher places earlier than usual. The young 
wero hatched and raised before the sheep got in this 
season and both old birds and their well grown broods 
went up to their regular feeding ground and are 
more plentiful this year than over before. 

The grouse of that region have about become ex- 
terminated, the bag limit of 25 is too strong for tho 
visible mpply. The work of the gun is helped by tho 
sheep, who feed and trample over every square foot of 
the country in which the birds breed, and destroy 
many nests of eggs and young hatched birds. 

The close season on snipe should be the salvation of 
the English snipe of that section, Sierra valley being 
a breeding ground for them. October 15th when the 
season opens is pretty late for good snipe shooting up 
there, in consequence the birds breed and propagate 
unmolested and find their way to lower shooting 
grounds In the open season. 



MONTEREY BAY FISHING. 

O. A. Hale, of San Jose, who has been making many 
records at the Santa Cruz fishing grounds this season, 
"out-Haled Hale" on the 20th inst. by bringing in 
the finest catch that has been recorded since the 
salmon began to run this year. Twenty-seven salmon, 
three yellowtall and one rock cod was the result of a 
few hours' trolling In the morning. "The yellowtall," 
said Mr. Hale, "fought hard, the 20-pound one 



to 



(July 29, 1905 



putting up a tussle that would do credit to a 50 pound 

"iTeVe'llowtail are seldom caught at Santa Cruz, 
Catalina being more famous for this game fish than 
any place ou the Coast. 

George Owen of San Jose was with Mr Hale and 
enjoyed the sport of seeing the yellowtail landed. 

Nelson and Warren French on the same morning 
were trolling off Pacific Grove; one of the boys hooked 
a 35 pound halibut, which pulled so hard the boy 
though he had a shark on, and with considerable 
difficulty he finally landed the fish. A number of 
salmon were also caught 

ON THE TRCCKEE. 

Fly-fishing on theTruckee, above Boca, is reported 
to be excellent at present and is being enjojed by a 
number of anglers. Carlos G. Young, Mr McNaugh- 
too, Achille Roos, Frank Lacoste, J. S. Turner and 
W. E. Murdock were among the recent visitors to mat 
famous resort. . , » 

Col. Young states the blue upright was an exceed- 
inglv good tty while he was fishing there. 

To let into good water the angler must go about 
four miles above Boca, for the Prosser creek dam is 
being cleaned out and the river below will probably 
be roily until tbe end of September. 

BASS FISHING. 

Striped bass fishing is remarkably backward this 
year, but few fish baing landed at any of the favorite 
resorts. In fact, in some heretofore good fashing 
grounds there has not been a bass taken for a long 
time past. A report was current during the week 
that a few bass had been caught at San Quentin point, 
one being a 20-pounder 

Several large fish were taken in Lake Merntt dur- 
ing the week. One, a 12-pounder, was hooked by 
Chas. Breidenstein on Thursday night Geo. Went- 
worth hooked a 12J-pound fish Fiiday night. Results 
g. nerally. however, are not encouraging and the aver- 
age run of fish landed are small ones. 

A few bass have been recently taken at Baker s 
beach. The bass caught there are generally of fair 
size, a 12 pounder being the weightof a recent capture. 

San Pablo bay is a lottery so far as striped bass is 
concerned. Some days the fish are running nicely, at 
other times they are non est. Some fair catches, 
among the fish taken being a few (i and 7 pound bass, 
have rewarded recent trips of anglers to San Pablo. 

NEW BLACK BASS RESORT. 

Some four or five years ago Alta lake or rather 
reservoir, near Towles on tbe Southern Pacific line of 
road, in Placer county, was stocked with black bass 
fry. The lake has evidently proven a congenial 
habitat for the fish, for they have prospered and in- 
creased to a remarkable extent. 

So well have the fish nourished that tbe lake was 
.opened to anglers this season. Mr. Volberg, of this 
city, recently enjoyed some lively sport with the Alta 
lake bass. He found, when he was there, that the 
most effective lure was trolling a live grasshopper 
on a No. 6 hook. One fish he caught weighed b\ 
pounds. He reports that the water is full of big black 
bass, and that he observed, near the sheltering fronds 
of the aquatic vegetation, thousands of young fry, shep- 
herded by the old fish and guarded against the maws 
of oatfish prowling about for black bass tidbits. From 
all indications, our anglers will in the near future 
have black bass fishing galore, for both the large and 
small-mouthed varieties seem to flourish in every 
water of the state where they have been placed. 

Black bass fishing at many points on the Sacra- 
mento river is reported to be excellent. Not long ago 
a large mouth black bas9 weighing nearly five pounds 
was taken near Bedding. Black bass are also plenti- 
ful in the river near Oroville, as are their cousins of 
the striped variety In fact, both species of the bass 
family flourish in the Sacramento. 

At the mouth of Mark West creek black bass are 
plentiful. A number of fair-sized fish have been 
caught recently. 

A notable angling trip was that ej joyed early this 
month by Mr. Bruce Cornwall when he fished in the 
vicinity of Kamloops, B. C. A big 7 pound rainbow 
sent to this city, frozen in a huge block of ice, was a 
pleasing reminder to many anglers of good sport on 
the northern streams. 

DOINGS IN DOGDOM. 



SANTA CRUZ SHOW. 

We are informed that the membership list of the 
recently organined Santa Cruz Kennel Club now 
reaches the seventy mark, comprised of the leading 
and most influential citizeas of that delightful ana 
popular seaside city. Further, that for the coming 
three-day show in September, the Casino manage- 
ment wiil donate $1000 worth of cups and prizes, this 
generous contribution will be enhanced by a sub- 
stantial recognition from the railroad. 

An Eastern judge will be in vited to come out here 
and judge the show, wo were informed. Rumor, this 
week, well founded we are inclined to balieve, gives 
out Harry W. Lacy, of Boston, as the judge selected. 
Mr. Lacy has judged here three times, twice anyhow, 
and has given satisfaction to exhibitors and spectators 
alike, and, being possessed of a pleasing and congenial 
personality, has made a number of friends. We be- 
lieve the securing of Mr. Lacy to preside over the 
seaside ring will be a drawing card. 

The fancy's .interests in Santa Cruz county has 
taken a booming and upward tendency and we wish 
them every success and will i-econd their efforts with- 
out stint. 

OBITER DICTUM. 

"The novice class shall be for Arnerican-bred does 
only, never having won a first prize at any recognized 
show, wins in the p ippy class excepted. " This simple 
announcement in the American Kennel Gazette, which 



is the official organ of the American Kennel Club, is 
of far reaching importance, says the Boston Herald. 
The above ruling goes into effect on August 1, and it 
is generally agreed among members of the fancy that 
it is one of the best decisions ever made by the govern- 
ing body of American dogdom. Its effect will be felt 
more particularly at the big shows in Madison Square 
Garden, New York, Mechanics' building, Boston, and 
at the Chicago dog show, as it is at these shows that 
the foreign-bred cracks have hitherto made their 
annual appearance in America. 

These foreign-bred dogs, imported at long prices, 
have as a rule won honors enough in England to 
entitle them to an American championship, yet they 
were allowed to enter in the novice with American- 
bred dogs that had never faced a judge. 

While this was all very nice for the gentlemen who 
picked up easy money by selling imported dogs at 
fancy prices to American exhibitors, it was unjust to 
the American breeder to compel him to enter a novice 
against a famous English bench show winner. 

It must be borne in mind that it is a much more 
difficult matter to obtain a championship in Great 
Britain t .an it isj in the United States. Over here 
all that is necessary for a ao% to become a champion 
is to have him win an aggregaieof 10 points in compe- 
tition in the winners' class at different shows. In 
England, however, a dog must win his full champion- 
ship title by winning threechampionshipsunderthrte 
different judges. 

The Jlerutd'x kennel contributor also has the fol- 
lowing pertinent matter. If the writer is the well 
known Boston kennel authority, whom we believe he 
is, we must congratulate him for having the courage 
of his convictions, for he strikes straight from the 
shoulder. But, really now, we never thought it 
would come that way, more'j the value of it. He 
writes: 

Trading in foreign-bred dogs has been a very profit 
able in vestment for some of the English judges, who 
come to America as guests of kennel clubs and inci- 
dentally as salesmen, for English judges have a jolly 
good time, socia ly aud financially, out of American 
dog shows. They are looked upon as the fountain 
heads from from vhich all knowledge flows in dogdom. 

Every year before the New York dog show begins 
one hears of British dogs, mostly Fox Terriers or Bull- 
dogs, being imported at fabulous prices, and later on 
the English judges appear on the Bcene and make tbe 
awards. In the mean time the American breeder is 
doing his level best to breed true to the type, but, no 
matter how well he succeeds, the English judges 
comes along, and, often complimenting the bonest 
American fancier, will finally turn him down by saying 
"Your dog has very good conformation, but he is 
rather light in bone, and it is really too bad. " 

A young Yale student who was up against this kitd 
of jollying for a number of years, finally decided to 
call the English bluff, and he has done it in a manner 
that has opened the eye9 of more than one American 
breeder. Joseph B Thomas, Jr , had a hobby for 
Russian Wolfhounds, and, after he had one or two 
gold bricks loaded on him from England, brought 
over the very best dogs that money could purchase, 
and he is now successfully breeding them. 

Some day the fanciers in other breeds may wake 
up to the fact that they have been buncoei for years. 
There are various kinds of graft, but the smooth 
English judge has such a chtrming way of rubbing it 
in that his American customers feel that It Is quite an 
honor to be done up brown. In the future, however, 
the imported dogs will not be especially favored, as 
they have been in the past, when they line up against 
American-bred bow-wows. In the novice classes the 
American breds will now have a "square deal," but 
the foreign judges will still have ample opportunity 
to bestow favors on the imported article. 



San Mateo Kennel Club's one day open air show on 
September 9tb, Santa Cruz three days' show, then 
Stockton In October makes the outlook a pleasing 
one, and it is to be hoped is the clincher for an annual 
summer and fall circuit. 

Another bit of gossip, on line with the other good 
tidings is that Oakland will show and that Charles 
Lvndon may judge at San Mateo. 

Four coming shows this year should bring out a lot 
of good young ones. There will be strong induce- 
ments to put likely puppies on the sawdust. 



One of our local Collie fanciers is having consider- 
able trouble in getting a setllement from a Chicago 
breeder. He sent $135 for a bitch several months ago, 
and despite repeated written requests, has been 
entirely ignored in every respect. The case evidently 
is one that should be made an example of. 



Presidio Kennels has leased the Collie bitch Welles- 
bourne Coquette ( Wellesbourne Conqueror-Red Hills 
Bomie). She was served by Dr. W. P. Burnham's 
Brandane Wishaw Squire (Ch. Balgreggie Baronet- 
Troon Mayflower) last week. 



D. P. Cresswell has recently received two very good 
Cocker puppies from the Portland Cocker Kennels. 
If they are, as we have been informed Portland Kid 
puppies, there is a promise of something good matur- 
ing. ' 

TRADE NOTES. 



AVERAGES REPORTED. 

New London, la , Fred Gilbert, first general average, 
575 out of 000, shooting "Du Pont." J. W Garrett 
of Colorado Springs, Colo., first amateur and second 
general average, 567 out of 600, shooting "Du Pont." 
E. M. Klein of Spirit Lake, la., second amateur and 
third general average, 564 out of 600 shooting "Du 
Pont." H G. Taylor of Meckling, S. Dak., third 



amateur average, 561 out of 600, shooting "New E. C '» 
(Improved). St. Louis, Mo , July 2d, 3d and 4tb, 
Fred Gilbert, first general average, 589 out of 600 
shooting "Du Pont." C. O. LeCompte, second general 
average, 561 out of 600, shooting "Infallible." F. P. 
Ford of St. Louis, first amateur average, 350 out of 
400, shooting "Du Pont." Carlisle, Pa, July 3d and 
5th, H. H. Stevens, first general average, 347 out of 
380, shooting "Du Pont " H. B. Shoop of Harrisburg, 
Pa., firBt amateur average, 336 out 380, shooting "Du 
Pont." A. C. Kreuger ol Columbia, Pa., second 
amateur average, 332 out of 380, shooting "New 
Schultze." L. Wertz of Temple, Pa., third amateur 
average, 326 out of 380, shooting"In fallible." Thomas- 
ville, Ga., July 4th and 5th, Walter Huff, first general 
average, 291 out of 310, shooting "Du Pont." J. W. 
Hightower, second general average, 261 out of 310, 
shooting "Du Pont." Col. J. T. Anthony, third 
general average, 259 oui of 310, shooting "Infallible." 
E. L Marbury of Gordon, Ga., first amateur average, 
250 out of 310, shooting "Du Pont." J. W. Huff of 
Walden, Ga., third amateur average, 245 out of 310, 
shooting "Du Pont." Scranton, Pa., July 6th and 7ih, 
W. H. Stroh of Pottston, Pa , first amateur average 
288 out of 330, shooting "Du Pont." J. B. Mason of 
Scranton, Pa., shooting "New Schultze, " and Thos. 
Murray of Minooka, Pa., shooting "Du Pont," tied 
for third amateur average, 282 out of 330. 



FACTS ARE CONCLUSIVE ARGUMENTS. 

While the echoes of the Grand American Handicap 
may have died away, Parker Bros, want to call tbe 
attention of the shooting fraternity to the perform- 
ance of Mr. John A. Flick, of Ravenna, O., a one- 
armed shooter who scored with the Parker gun, 97 
out of a possible 100, at this famous shoot. Tbe 
Parker gun also made some other very good records 
at the shoot, winning the World's Team Race with a 
total of 474 out of 500, and four Parkers out of five 
shooters in this event. The Consolation Handicap 
was also won with the Parker gun in the bands of Mr. 
J T. Atkinson, tying on 99, and shooting out his 
opponent. 

At Waynesboro, Va , on July 4, Mr C. H. New- 
comb, of Philadelphia, strictly an amateur, won high 
amateur average, and at Richmond, Va , on Decora- 
tion Day, also won high amateur average. At New 
London, la., which is quite a shooting center, it may 
be interesting to sportsmen to know that the three 
handicap events held during their last tournament 
were all won with the Parker gun. Barton, of 
Chicago, and Gilbert and Garrett all tied on 50 
straight, Barton breaking 100 straight to win the 
event. The spcond day handicap was won by John 
Burmeister, with 50 straight, and the third day 
handicap was won by Fred Gilbert with 50 straight. 
All of the handicap events were won with the "Old 
Reliable" Parker in the hands of amateurs in two 
cases. In three days' shootirg, the "Old Reliable" 
Parker made scores of 200 straight, which is a re- 
markable perfoimance and proves conclusively-tbe 
reliabilitv and effectiveness of the famous "Old 
Reliable." 

READY FOR ANY DEMANDS. 

A contract for 3,000,000 rounds of small arm 
cartridges was awarded on June 27th by the War De- 
partment to the Winchester Repeating Arms Co. The 
Chief ol Ordnance, General Crozier, in making tbe 
award said, "Although tbe price offered is higb, I, 
nevertheless, consider that private plants shall be 
prepared and have experience In the manufacture of 
government ammunition, which is needed so desper- 
ately and in such large quantities in time of war."* In 
reading the General's remarks, one is strongly re- 
minded of the French phrase "Pour vlre,"It is to 
laugh. Instead of the Winchester Company being 
unprepared and having lack of experience, etc , as he 
hints, it doubtless occurs to the initiated that if our 
ordnance department were as well equipped and as 
ready to fill large orders as the Winchester people, it 
would not be necessary toadvertise for bids on govern- 
ment ammunition. During the late Spanish-American 
War, the Winchester Co. supplied our Army with 
100,000,000 rounds of ammunition, and our Navy with 
over 50,000,000 rounds of small and large caliber 
cartridges. A great percentage of tbe rapid fire gun 
ammunition used by Admiral Dewey and his fleet at 
that memorial battle of Manila Bay, and a large 
quantity of the ammunition used by Admiral Samp- 
son's fleetat Santiago, was manufactured by the Win- 
chester Repeating ArmsCompany, so it does not seem 
that this company is in need of much experience in 
making government ammunition. 



PETERS' POINTS. 

Mr. Neaf Apgar, shooting at Towanda. Pa., on 
June 3, won high average over all contestants, scoring 
180 out of 185, and making one run of 97 straight. 
Mr. Apgar won high average at Richmond, Va., on 
July 4, and on tbe same day Mr. E. H. Storr was 
high at Roanoke. Va. 

On July 6, at De Soto, 111., Peters' shells made a 
clean sweep. Mr. H. W. Cad wallader won high pro- 
fessional average, 95i%; Mr. E. Shanks high amateur, 
91 ; and Mr. McMillan second amateur, 90<%. 

At Spring Hill, Tenn., on July 4, Peters' shells 
were used by tbe winners of first, second and third 
averages, and tbe team loving cup Tbe attendance 
at this shoot exceeded expectations, as over sixty 
men faced the traps. 

At Corsicana, Texas, July 4 and 5, Mr. L. I. Wade, 
Texas representative of tbe Peters Cartridge Com- 
pany, won high average, missing only eight out of 
350 targets. Mr. Wade is keeping up the fast pace 
which he set at IndianaDolis. and attributes It to the 
perfect qualities of bis Idetlload. 

At Abilene, Texas, July 4, high average was won 
by Mr. W. W. Winniford with Peters' shells, also the 
live bird event, Mr. Winniford killing fifteen straight. 
The remarkable part about it was that be used bis 
regular Ideal target load for live birds, and that did 
the work perfectly. 



JULY 29, 1905] 



11 



Stallions to Produce Carriage Horses. 



In judging "trotting-bred stallions suited to pro- 
duce carriage horses" for what are we going to look 
in order to ffame decisions correctly and logically? 
The fast trotter and the heavy carriage horse diflVr 
radically in conformation. It is obvious that we can- 
not judge trotting-bred stallions in this ring as we 
would judge them in their own ring as sires of trot- 
ters. We must go outside all established lines. We 
must first look ior the horse that possesses the heavy 
harness conformation and substance and action, and 
if we do not find one that fills this bill the prizes 
should be withheld, for a stallion cannot be expected 
to transmit qualities which he does not possess and 
which his immediate ancestors did not possess before 
him. We must remember, moreover, that the Ameri- 
can trotter springing from Hambletonian 10 has a 
strain of hackney in him, for Hambletonian himself 
was out of the Charles Kent mare, daughter of imp. 
Bellfounder, which was an English-bred hackney and 
\a numbered 55 in Vol. I of the Hackney Stud Book of 
Great Britain and Ireland. It is well known that cer- 
tain of the Hambletonian strains show much more of 
the carriage type than others, and it is probably a 
fact, though one impossible of demonstration, that 
the most of the best heavy harness horses so far pro- 
duced in the trotting breed have sprung from these 
tribet or from them in union with a few others that 
have become merged mostly in the Hambletonian, 
such tribes as the Royal Georges, Forests, Morgans 
and bo forth. Undoubtedly stallions carrying such 
blood will be more likely to succeed infilling heavy 
harness acceptably than the others in whose lineage 
such lines are not found. 
Two things then we must bear in mind when going 

nto a ring tD find the "trotting-bred stallion best 
fitted to produce carriage horses"— first, that we want 
a horse of carriage, not trotting, conformation; sec- 
ond, one In "vhicb the bloodlines promise carriage 
excellence rather than extreme speed. In other 
words, while we desire to make use of that which gen- 
erations of Yankee brains, skill and push have done 

for the trotter; while we want all the fire tnd vim and 
vigor of the race horse; while we want every particle 
of fineness the refining influence of the track has im- 



parted; while we want this and perhaps more, we 
want it all so that we may be aided not combated by 
heredity. In fact, we want and must h ive the assist- 
ance of the carriage strains in the trotter. It stands 
well to the reason of any thinking man that if we 
have these aids we must have laid a good foundation 
for victory. 

Plenty of men still think and some blatantly avow 
that the racing trotter is the only source from which 
to d raw our heavy harness horses. Such men going 
into a ring to judge trotting stallions for the purposes 
under discussion will not advance the cause they 
champion so loudly. Under their mistaken rule we 
must remain exactly where wo are now or retrograde. 
On the contrary, let the men who are chosen to pass 
on such classes set aside the strict trotting type alto- 
gether and select that which is wanted for heavy 
leather as nearly as possible, and with proper intelli- 
gent selection we shall have in time a carriage horse 
producing strain of the trotting breed. It may not 
be easy at the first to find specimens that just till the 
bill; but if the judges of such classes will follow one 
rule they cannot go far wrong, and unless they do 
follow it they can do no feood. Here is that rule: 
"Admit to the premium li>t only stallions which them- 
selves possess the confoi mation, style, quality, sub- 
stance and action required in heavy harness horses of 
the highest class." Adhere strictly to this rule and 
success must follow; depart from it and we must stand 
still or go back. The stallion which begets high- 
priced carriage horses with regularity must have all 
their attributes in marked degree. Long backs, 
ragged quarters, ewe-necks, light flanks, cat hams, 
narrowness, dragging hocks and a tendency to pace 
or shuffle when going slow must be barred. — Breeders 
Gazette. 

News From the North. 



[Rural Spirit, Portland.] 
John Marble, of Los Angeles, owns the Oregon bred 
mare Altawood 2:20 by Altamont, out of Hollywood, 
and has two fillies one and two year olds out of her by 
Zombro. 

J. C Hinshaw, of Salem, Oregon, is breeding his 
mare Mary Bell Vernon the dam of the good two-year- 



old Vernon Jones, back to Capt. Jones this year and 
is in hopes of getting another Vernon Jones. 

J. A. Jones has purchased the broodmare MInmont, 
by Altamont dam Minnie M. T (dam of TrumoDt 2:21}, 
Satin Royal 2:19}) by Rockwood, second dam Sally 
M. (dam of Pathmark 2:09}, Altao 2:09}) by Oregon 
Pathfinder, from P. J. Mann, and In return sold Mr. 
Mann Alice J., two-year-old, by Capt. Jones, dam 
Amy May, by Alexis 2:18 son of William L., dam 
Beulah, dam of Kinmont, etc., by Altamont and a full 
sister to Chehalis 2:04}. 

W. A. DeLashmuthas 6ent his trotting mare Lem.-. 
netta2:25J to J. B. Stetson, at Sakm, wno will train 
and race her this season. She is considered a Very 
promising mare. Last season she wa» started eight 
times on half mile tracks winning two first, four 
second moneys and was twice unplaced. £he Is by' 
Norcatur, a 6on of Norval by Electioneer; first dnm 
Arabella 2:26 by Arabesque, second dam a producing 
daughter of Hiatoga. 

J. T. and J. H. Wilkinson of Chilliwack, B. C, are 
breeding Hazel Kirk and Red Lea to Zombro 2:11 and 
Red Girl, the dam of Red Lea, to Hal B. 2:04} Hazel 
Kirk is an inbred Altamont being by Altamont 3B00, 
dam Cbemeketa by Altamont 3600. She is a good 
individual and just the caper for a good broodmare. 
Red Girl is by The Marquis, dam by Red Buck. She 
i9 the dam of Panama Maid 2:20 and Red Lea that 
can go in the; list any time. Red Lea won the British 
Columbia Futurity for two-year-olds last year and wilj 
be given a record this fall. 

Geo. T. Beckers, who is making a season with his 
stallion Zombro ia this city, priced him last week to 
a Boston party at $50,000. When Mr. Beckers re- 
ceived the letter asking for a price on this great 
young sire he ad vised with a number of prominen t 
horsemen before fixing the price even at what may 
seem high to those who have not considered the 
question of value of a pronounced speed sire. Whan. 
McKinney was sold for $25,000 some people thought it 
a big price, but the man who bought him made $9tV 
000 on the deal. Zombro is a much younger horse 
than was McKinney and he promises to be jusVas 
good a sire. To a man who has a breeding farm. $50,- 
000 is not too much for a young sire of Zombro's 
stamp. 




THE FARM. 




The "Shrops. 



The Shropshire breed of sheep stands 
unsurpassed as an all round farmers' 
sheep adapted to all conditions, writes a 
correspondent of Shepherd's Criterion. 
Not only is the Shropshire a farmer's 
sheep, but it is the rich man's sheep 
also. They keep them on their large 
farms because of their beauty and pro- 
lificacy. The Shropshire is the universal 
breed. It is found in large numbers in 
England, Ireland, Scotland, the United 
States, Canada and almost everywhere 
known to sheep growers. 

Everywhere Shropshire rams are used 
to grade up the common class of ewes. 
And why is this so? It is becaure they 
have proved themselves to be the most 
profitable. Shropshires are also very 
profitable when raised in pure bred flocks 
The ewes of this breed drop a large num- 
ber of lambs and nurse them well, and as 
soon as the lambs are partly matured 
ready sale at good prices for them is im- 
mediately found. The ranchmen buy 
Shropshire rams by the carload, a very 
large majority of the smaller sheep 
growers use Shropshire rams and when 
you get the exceptionally good ones there 
are plenty of pure bred breeders willing 
to pay you well for your product. 

The fleece of the Shropshire sells at a 
very high figure. The Shropshire pro- 
duces the higheBt priced mutton that goes 
oil the market. Time and time again 
have grade Shropshire lambs topped the 
Chicago and other leading markets. At 
the leading shows, such as the Inter- 
national, held at Chicago, Shropshire 
wethers nave always carried away a large 
portion of the laurels for champion 
mutton, hence a very profitable sheep 
adapted to most all conditions and most 
all people. 

Sober up on Jackson's Napa Soda. 



Farm and Home Notes. 



When corn has failed, it is a good plan 
to plant peas. Three pecks to the acre 
may be used. 

It pays to have everything convenient. 
It saves in timeand effort, and that really 
saves money. 

It is no small art to be able to cut and 
dry hay just right. Some cut too late, 
and the hay is too woody. 

The best time to cut alfalfa' is when it 
is beginning to bloom. Fields are usually 
uniform and may be cut when about one 
tenth of the flowers are in bloom. 

It pays to go to conventions. To hear a 
great man talk, or to talk with one for an 
hour, may lead to successful plans which 
will affect our whole lives. 

When the crop has commenced to grow, 
shallow cultivation should be adopted, 60 
as to kill the weeds and encourage 
moisture. This can hardly be overdone. 

During thesummernoone works harder 
than the farmer. He needs some recrea- 
tion and should plan so that his evenings 
may be as long as possible and as free 
from care. 

When ground has been packed by 
heavy rain, it is necessary to cultivate it 
a little deeper than usual, at first, so as to 
loosen the soil and vitalize by letting in 
the air. Late cultivation should always 
be shallow. 

There is a general sentiment that if a 
man's horse or cow goes estray, his 
neighbor's shall help him to get it back. 
Should not this also apply to his son or 
daughter, if they are going wrong, friends 
and neighbors should help them get right 

The secret of shocking bay, or of stack- 
ing it, is to keep it highest in the middle. 
Let the first fork full be heaped up, and 
shock the hay on that. A good stack Is 
built on the same principle. If the water 
scaks in a few inches it will drain and dry 
out. 

While harvesting it pajs to keep up 
with one- work. Hay should Le cut 
down, dried and handled as little as 
possible. Rain, or dew spoils the color, 
and while a small amount does not effect 
the nutritious value, it spoils the color, 



and the price. The mower Bhould be 
started in the morning, the hay raked 
into windows and put into small shocks 
the same day, even if it is necessary to 
open them the next day. — Texas Farmer 



Charcoal as a Food for Poultry. 

Whenever the word charcoal appears 
one looks impulsively to the results 
obtained by its use. Charcoal is a cleaner 
and purifier. That has always been its 
etiief qualification and its use among 
poultry will invariably be manifested in 
bright red combs and wattles, and a 
sprightly demeanor among the fowls. 
Utilized as a deodorizer its value cannot 
be overestimated. 

Charcoal ha9 been made use of for 
years with telling effect in the food for 
poultry. The commercial product may 
have some advantages in being scientifi- 
cally prepared, but any one with a few 
ears of corn and a bed of hot coals in any 
kitchen stove can prepare a substitute 
product that will in every way fill the 
uses to which the commercial product may 
be put so far as poultry is concerned. 
The product will be eagerly consumed by 
the fowls and its influence on the system 
will be directly noticeable in the improved 
appearance of every fowl that has par- 
taken of it. 

For various disorders arising from 
improper digestion and assimilation of 
foods the use of powdered charcoal in the 
food rations will invariably prove bene- 
ficial. Sour crop will yield readily to the 
assistance of charcoal. As a tunic for 
sickly appearing fowls the uso of charcoa' 
is unsurpassed. Many unwittingly makei 
the error of attempting to relieve these 
conditions of sick and deranged chicks 
and fowls by doping, which in tl.e main 
tends only to make matters worse. 
o 

It pays to take a walk around the barns 
just before going to bed to see that the 
stock are all right. Such a practice will 
save lots of money in a lifetime. 

o 

Variety of foods for any ,:lass of stoik 
helps health, gains and profit. 



Ducks and Ducklings. 

' ' •; (CMS f i r JUiq<». 

Broody ducks are almost a rarity; 

It is hard to fatten the laying duck. 

Steeped alfalfa is an excellent substi- 
tute for green food. 

Ducklings usually start their molt when 
about eleven weeks old. 

Soft shelled eggs come occasionally, bat 
not as often as from hens. 

It is nothing unusual to get'eggs from 
ducks at five months of age. 

It takes a duck about six weeks to molt 
and get in good condition again. 

Four ducks laid 012 eggs last season 
from which were hatched ;500 little ducks" 

Cracked oyster shells are placed before 
the ducklings from the time they are 
placed in the brooders. 

Duck eggs must be set as fresh as 
possible to secure a good hatch. They 
lose their fertility very quickly. 

Fifty breeding ducks should keep three 
200-egg incubators going and turn out be- 
tween two and three thousand ducks in 
a season, giving one man all the employ- 
ment he would want. 

Ducks are not subject to disease, aa a 
rule. They are not troubled with vermin 
and do not have gapes. The lack of 
coarse sand in the food will give them 
indigestion, and damp quarters at night 
will cripple them with rheumatism.— 
Tree and Vine. 

,p 

I'rofit can never be starved out of an 
animal. Neither is there any money 
made in keeping a beast on a ration that 
provides just enough to keep the body. 
Profit comes from the use of tho feed that 
is consumed after all the normal wants of 
the body are taken care of. An animal 
can be likened to a machine in some 
things. If an engine was given just fuel 
enough to keep it running, and no moje, 
an attempt to force it to run a feed grinder 
or do any other work would shut it down. 
Profitable work can be secured only when 
suitable fuel is consumed to -frroduce It. 
So it iB with the animals. Gains can 
never be made until more feed is con- 
sumed than is needed to maintain the 
wear and tear of the system. 



12 



[July 29, 1906 



Milk and Its Care. 



"Milk is responsible for the deaths of 
thousands of babies and old people every 
year in our cities." This is what one of 
the leading physicians of a large city said 
to me a few days ago in speaking of the 
difficulty of getting a pure milk supply. 
It had been very warm for a week and the 
mortality among the children had been 
unusually great. "This morning the milk 
which came to me was decidedly off," a 
gentleman added after the doctor had 
made this assertion. "It was not sour, 
butitemelled bad. There was a dead, 
shut-up odor that made me afraid to use 
it. 

I know just what this smell was, for I 
had met in my own dairy sometimes, 
especia'ly when the weather is hot and 
the air full of what the learned weather 
men call "humidity," writes E.L.Vin- 
cent in Wisconsin Agriculturist. And it 
is hard work to avoid these odors at the 
season of the year when heat is the pre- 
vailing condition of the atmosphere day 
after day. 

Now, I have no doubt that the doctor 
was right in his assertion as to the ex- 
cessive mortality among the little folks 
due to impure milk. Most of the bowel 
troubles which take the children away 
come from germ diseases, and germB are 
always present in impure milk. 

I never was sicker in my life than once 
when away from home at a hotel I drank 
a glass of milk for supper. It was a very 
warm dav but 1 did not notice anything 
whatever wrong with the milk I used. I 
had been feeling perfectly well, so that I 
am satisfied that what followed could be 
traced right back to the milk, for I had 
eaten nothing else which could account 
for it. I went to bed and fell asleep. 
About ten o'clock I woke feeling deathly 
sick. I vomited and had a terrible 
diarrhoea which rapidly took my strength. 
In less than two hours I was so sick that 
I could scarcely stand. Calling a physician 
after a time I succeeded in checking the 
trouble, but it w r as several days before I 
was as strong as before. Since then ] 
have been more careful than ever about 
having the milk from my dairy just as 
pure and sweet as care can make it. 

None of us would like to be told that 
we are partners with disease, and especi- 
ally disease which attacks and has' for 
its victims the helpless little ones. And 
yet, whenever we are not scrupulously 
careful about the condition our milk is in 
when it goes to the milk station or Nvhen 
it is changed into the form of cream or 
butter or cheese, we are at least acces- 
sories after the fact if someone dies of 
disease contracted through our careless- 
ness or neglect. So it stands us in hand 
to work faithfully against such a charge. 
We have sins enough to answer for and 
the gray hairs will come fast enough 



Warranted to Give Satisfaction. 

Gombauli's 

Caustic Balsam 




Has Imitators But No Competitors. 

A Safe, Speedy and Positive Cure for 
Curb, Splint. Sweeny, Capped Hock, 
Strained Tendons, Founder, Wind 
Puffs, and all lameness from Spavin, 
Ringbone and other bony tumors. 
Cures all skin diseases or Parasites, 
Thrush, Diphtheric. Removes all 
Bunches from Horses or Cattle, 

As a Human Remedy for Rheumatism, 
Sprains, Sore Throat, etc, It Is invaluable. 

Xvery bottle of Caustie Balsam sold Is 
Warranted to (rive satisfaction. Price $1 50 
per bottle. Sola by druggists, or sent by ex- 

f tress, ch arge s paid, with full directions for 
ts use. BTSend for descriptive circulars, 
testimonials, etc. Address 

The Lawrence-William* Co., Cleveland, 



without our adding to the burden or in- 
viting the white locks by sending out milk 
that is not strictly pure. 

There are a number of devices now on 
the market for sending pure air through 
fresh milk, thus lessening the liability to 
the growth of germs. These all work on 
practically the same plan. The warm 
milk slowly paesee through the aerator, 
bringing the little stream of liquid into 
contact with the air. Then it should be 
set away somewhere so that it may not 
attract to itself any odors from decaying 
or otherwise ill-smelling vegetables or 
fruits. 

It seems sometimes as if the subject of 
washing dairy utensils clean has been 
spoken of so many times that nobody pays 
any attention to it. And yet, no subject 
is of more vital importance to the dairy- 
man. Wash clean, men and brethren. 
Wash clean! This is our everlasting 
watchword. That is one thing we may 
all do. We may think we are not able to 
buy an aerator, but we can use a clean 
brush and plenty of hot water and elbow 
grease. These will count, particularly if 
we avail ourselves of the purifying help 
of the air and sunshine by placing all our 
utensils out of doors where these agencies 
can woik upon them. 

And right here is still another thing 
we can do. We can give our cans of 
milk a good thorough shaking up two or 
three times in the course of the evening, 
if we have no specially prepared aerator. 
After the milk is in the can all ready for 
shipment, take the can firmly by the top 
and whirl it round 60 as to throw the con- 
tents smartly from one side to the other, 
and keep this up until the milk has ail 
been stirred from the bottom and brought 
in contact with the air. An hour or so 
later repeat this operation. On very warm 
nights it will pay to get out of bed and go 
out to the cans and repeat the operati n. 

If you can arrange it to bring a spring 
down to the house, so much the better. 
Rig up a trough and into this set the 
cans alter the milk has been put into 
them. Even if the water be not very 
cold if it runs through the trough it will 
do much to cool and purify the milk. 
But whether you can do this on not, do 
not neglect shaking the cans and where- 
ever possible leave the covers off. By 
buiiding a little roof over the trough this 
will be easier. Sinothered milk will sour 
much more quickly than that which has 
been well aerated. 

There is a deep sense of satisfaction in 
thinking that so far as we are concerned 
we have done our best to give the city 
neighbors, pure, sweet milk and butter. 
The time is coming when our laws will be 
more stringent than they now are on 
this subject. The drift is that way, and 
that is as it should be. The man who 
will complain because he is required to 
keep his stables and all things connected 
therewith absolutely clean would find 
fault if he were to be asked to wear a 
clean shirt to church on Sunday. And it 
would be a pretty small specimen of a 
man that would do that. 



Did you ever watch the actions of a 
horse when he is free to choose his own 
place to rest. He will select a level spot 
where his feet may have a flat surface to 
rest upon, says the Maine Farmer, 
Therefore, see to it that the stall where 
horses have to pass a large part of their 
time in winter, or in fact in any season 
is well adapted to their comfort. Many a 
horse has contracted permanent injury 
simply because he was compelled to stand 
in a strained and unnatural position in 
his stall. 

o 

You can tell more about the mutton 
qualities and the general thrift and feed 
init ability of your sheep now after they 
are shorn and before the wool is grown 
out long again, than at any other time in 
the year. It is therefore a good time to 
do the culling of the ewe flock. 

Sponges. S. Adder-ley, 307 Market St 



Sustaining the Milk Flow in Dry 
Summers. 



In this section of southwest Missouri 
drouth usually comes about three seasons 
out of five. I am obliged to make pro- 
vision for the protection of summer 
pastures, writes W. N. Love in Orange 
Judd Farmer. Dairymen in general are 
prone to overstock pastures in the early 
part of the season pnd when drouth 
comes they are already short and conse- 
quently suffer greatly. After a hard 
winter I hire a summer pasture and leave 
the home supply more than ample for 
the dairy cows. The next provision is to 
see that the ample land is not used for 
pasture until late in the season, unless 
drouth makes it necessary. If the past- 
ure is not overstocked and ordinary 
growth of mowed land untouched I am 
pretty safe until the middle of September 
for an ordinary herd of cattle. 

The next provision I usually make is 
to sow some cow peas and plant some late 
corn of the early ripening variety, or of 
the evergreen sweet variety on wheat 
land, immediately after the wheat is cut. 
This ground is plowed or disked, if con- 
ditions for disking are proper, while I 
plant about two gallons of peas and one 
gallon of corn per acre in the row. If 
only peas are to be planted, I use about 
20 pounds, or one third of a bushel to the 
acre, and go over the ground twice, mak 
ing the rows about 22 inches apart. The 
only cultivation given this crop is one or 
two harrowings just after they have ap- 
peared above the ground. 

Putting in this crop requires little extra 
labor, although it comes at a time when 
there is much other important work on 
the farm, but the results more than pay 
for the extra work, if the season proves 
to be very dry. In any case, we have an 
excellent amount of extra feed and have 
benefitted the soil. 

If the mixed crop is not needed during 
a drouth period, then wait until they 
begin tor' pen and shock for hay. A ton 
of this pea hay will be worth almost as 
much as a ton of wheat bran. I have 
grown cowpeas continuously for 16 years, 
and during this time I have experimented 
with millets, sorghum, Kaffir corn, etc., 
but have found nothing that equals an 
early variety of corn planted late with 
peas, peas alone as feed paying, to say 
nothing of the benefits to the soil. 

I think however, that alfalfa is better 
than corn and peas to carry the dairy 
cows over the drouth period, without 
diminishing the flow of milk, but up to 
the preseit time my experience with 
alfalfa has been in learning how to sow it, 
though with the use of inoculating bac- 
teria I hope to be able to have some suc- 



cess. My experience has been that other 
grasses tend to crowd out alfalfa. In one 
case, with a heavy application of barn- 
yard manure, I had as fine a pasture of 
timothy and red clover as I ever wish to 
see, and the alfalfa completely dis- 
appeared. 

Silage will fully meet the emergency of 
a dry period, but hitherto I have never 
hail enough to last until past the first of 
May, and but few dairy farms are equipped 
with large enough silos to be able to have 
this feed the year around. In conclusion 
will say that if no other provision has 
been made for the drouth period, it will 
pay to feed dairy cows bran or cottonseed 
meal and green corn from the field, in 
order to sustain the milk flow. 



When you have plenty of farm ma- 
chinery and horses, but are short on 
human help, try hitching a team with a 
harrow behind the plow. When you are 
through plowing you will have thor- 
oughly prepared the piece with the 
harrow. 

o 

Weeds in a pasture, or anywhere else, 
are unsightly. Salting patches of weeds 
in a pasture often solves the problem of 
how to clean them up. By keeping at 
this policy week after week and year after 
year, results can be accomplished. 
o 

Never shoe a horse except when the 
work he must do will make shoeing 
necessary for the protection of the feet. 
There is a great deal of farm work at 
which the horse's feet are much better 
without shoes. 



PRIVILEGES! 

FOR SALE. 

Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders 
Association Race Meeting at 

SANTA ROSA 

AUGUST 16, 17, 18 and 19, 1905 

1)IDS FOR THE FOLLOWING PRIVILEGES 
' f will be received up to Monday noon, Aug. 7th: 

BETTING (Auction and Mutuel or 

Totalization Pools) 
FRUIT, CANDY, NUTS and 

ICE CREAM 
PROGRAMMES 

A certified check for 50 per cent should acoom- 
pan; all bids Right reserved to reject any or 
all bids. 

MUSIC 

Estimates will be received for furnishing 
Music— 8 or 10 men to play one hour each day for 
four days in band wagon on street and from 2 to 
4:30 o'clock at the track. 

Address 

F. W. KELLEY, Secretary, 
36 Geary Street, San Francisco. 



Starting Payments Due 

AUGUST 7, 1905. 

Pacific Breeders Futurity Stakes 
]\Tos. Q and S. 



Two-Year-Olds 

(FOALS OF 1903) 

On Pacers $25 

On Trotters $35 

Money Divided: 



Three-Year-Olds 

(FOALS OF 1902) 

On Pacers $35 

On Trotters $50 

Money Divided: 



Two-Year-Old Trotters . . . .81350 

Two-Year-Old Pacers 750 

Nominator Dam of Winner Trot 200 

Nominator Dam of Winner Face 200 

Owner of Stallion, sire of Winner of Three-Tear-Old Trot, when mare was bred. 

Owner of Stallion, sire of Winner of Three-Tear-Old Pare, when mare was bred. 

Nominators must designate, when making payments to start, whether the 
horse entered is a trotter or a pacer. 

Two-Year-Olds that start are not barred from starting again In the 
Three-Year-Old divisions. 



Three-Tear-Old Trotters S2000 

Three-Tear-Old Paeers 1000 

Nominator Dam of Winner Trot 200 

Nominator Dam of Winner Pace 200 

100 
100 



E. P. HEALD. President. 



F. W. KELLEY, Secretary, 

86 GEARY ST., BAN FRANCISCO 



July 29, 1905] 



13 



Feeding Bran to Horses. 

There is so much prejudice for and 
against certain feeds, time of watering, 
color of horses and fads, that it is well to 
have practical horsemen tell us the right 
and then throw our prejudice to the 
winds. The English Farm and Home 
publishes the following article on feeding 
bran, that explains from a veterinary 
point the value of bran when fed with 
grain and hay as a relish, much as some 
of our stock foods to maintain condition : 

The feeding of dry bran is very often 
supposed to have a binding effect upon a 
horse's bowels, but there is no real reason 
why this frequently-expressed opinion 
should be held, as dry bran does not, as a 
matter of fact, possess any binding 
properties. It proves a perfectly whole- 
some food for horses and it is, as a general 
rule, much liked by them and eaten with 
great relish. Bran is not, of course, a 
food that will make muscle and give hard 
working condition, like corn, and it can- 
not in any way be regarded as a substitute 
for the latter despite the fact that the 
chemical composition of bran, as shown 
by the figures of an analysis, is much akin 
to that of oats or maize. Bran is a useful 
supplementary foodstuff for horse-feeding 
purposes, both on account of the nourish- 
ment which it contains and of its palata- 
bility to horses. In the case of horses 
which are poor feeders, the plan of mixing 
some bran instead of chaff with their corn 
often is successful in inducing them to 
consume their feed of corn with greater 
relish than they otherwise do. When a 
horse is a bad doer, and in consequence 
carries too little flesh on its ribs, the 
animal's b dily condition may not in- 
frequently be improved by feeding a 
goodly daily allowance of bran— say, 4 to 
5 pounds. The consumption of this large 
quantity of bran every day, in addition 
to the usual corn ration and hay allowance, 
often causes a horse to put on flesh and 
gain in weight and bodily condition. Bran 
is practically just as suitable as chaff or 
chop for the purpose of mixing with tne 
feed of corn in order to make the horses 
chew and insalivate their corn in a 
thorough manner, and it is much more 
palatable to horses than chaff or chop. 

Bran is a very useful food for such idle 
horses as may require an allowance of 
concentrated food in addition to their 
other diet. It contains an ample amount 
of nourishment, and is nitrogenous in 
character, and yet it is in no? ise heating 
in its effects upon the horse's system— a 
fact which renders it pre-eminently suit- 
able as a concentrated foodstuff for idle 
horses, and those that perform but very 
little work. Some bran is alBO a useful 
adjunct to the diet of heavy-in-foal mares 
and for mares with suckling foals at foot. 
Bran is very generally regarded as a 
milk-making food by horse breeders, and 
although there are no accurately car:ied 
out experiments in regard to this question 
on record which could be adduced in sup- 
port of this opinion, it is supported by 
the fact that bran proves a good milk- 
producing food in the case of dairy cows, 
and it is pretty safe to assume that if 
bran has a stimulating effect on the flow 
of milk in cows, it has a similar effect in 
the case of suckling broodmares. 

Bran is very suitable as a supplement- 
ary concentrated food for weaned foals 
and young horses, There is nothing bet- 
ter than a little bran for mixing with 
the crushed oats when foals are being 
brought on to solid food, bran being easily 
digested by a foal when the latter is able 
to deal with solid food. In the case 
of sick horses and those that are con- 
valescent, the inclusion of some bran in 
their diet proves very beneficial. On 
account of it palatability, bran tempts the 
appetite of sick horses more easily than 
other dry foods. 

Canary Hay Seed. 

Major C. P. Braslan of the BraBlan Seed 
Growers' Company has the following to 
say to a 8an Jose Mercury reporter in re- 



gard to the growing of canary seed, which 
has been undertaken with great success 
this season in the San Juan valley. 

"At our seed farm this year we planted 
canary seed in quantity, for the first 
time in this country. The planting was 
done merely for seed purposes. But as 
the plant developed, we began to realize 
that we had discovered something that 
promised to revolutionize hay growing. 

"You are presumably aware this year 
wheat and barley have suffered much 
from rust. But this field was free from 
rust while wheat and barley, side by side 
with this field, were eaten up with rust. 
It seems to be rust proof. 

"Cows and horses are so fond of it that 
they will pass by barley and wheat to get 
at. the canary seed. And better still, 
they can't eat too much as it is harmless.'' 

As to the productiveness, it grows over 
five feet high and will make five tons of 
hay to the acre. It is ready for cutting 
two or three weeks earlier than barley. 

As a seed plant it produces about 1500 
pounds of seed to the acre, and in plant- 
ing about 30 pounds of seed should be 
drilled in. — Hollister Advance . 

o 

Shade is worth money to sows and little 
pigs now. Comfort and profit are closely 
allied in the hog business. 



Turtle's Elixir 

is a quick and permanent cure 
for distemper, founder, lameness 
of all kinds, pneumonia, thrush, 
cuts, bruises, collar and saddle 
galls, colds, stiffness, etc. It ia 
used and endorsed by the Adama 
Express Co. We offer 

$100 Reward 

for any case of Colic, Curb, Con- 
tracted or Knotted Cords, Splints, 
recentShoe Boils or Callous that 
it will not cure. 

Tuttle's Family Elixir 

ft) the best household remedy that can be used for 
rheumatism, sprains and all other pains and aches. 
Saves doctor bills and stops pain instantly. Our 100- 
Tage book, "Veterinary Experience," free. Send for it. 
1 'utile's Elixir Co. 53 Beverly St. Boston, Mass. 
fl'nck & Co., Agi-nls, 13-15 Fremont St., San Fran elseo. f'nl. 
it-ware of so-called Elixirs. Tattle' s only is genuine. Avoid 
all blisters; they are only temporary relief* 




California Safe Deposit 
and Trust Company 



Receives Savings Deposits of 
Ten Dollars and Upwards 



IT PAYS INTEREST 

TWICE A YEAR 

Rate— 

3 Jif per cent on ordinary accounts 
3 (M0 per cent on term accounts 



CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $1 ,500,399 46 

TOTAL ASSETS 7,665,839.38 



Deposits may be made by P. O. Order, 
Wells-Fargo Money Order or Bank Draft 
Send for Pamphlets Descriptive of Our 
Business 



OFFICES 
Cor. California and Montgomery Stg. 

BAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 




Used 15 Years 

Spavins, 
Ringbone, 
Splints, 
Curbs, 
Lameness. 

The great cure Is 

Kendall's Spavin Cure. 

Hcnfryn, Ont., Feb. SC. 19VI. 
Dr. IS. I. KENDALL CO.. 

(lentiemen- I have used your Kenda II'. Spavin Cur. 
for i. r > years and have always found It (food. Saved the 
life of several horses l»y usinvf your "Treatise on the 
llursc" as a ,'..!.-:. Very truly yours, 

II liNRY KOQAL. 

Ah n liniment for fnnillv OM It Ihim iio BQUftL Prle. 
• I ; S tor SS. \ - It jronrdrumdlt for K.nd.lf. Spavin 
Cur., (ilwo M A Tr.atla. on th. Hone," t be hook 1 1 Be. 
or address 

DR. 8. J. KENDALL CO., ENOSBURC FALLS, VT. 



FOR SALE. 

"A STRATH WAY" 

A Dapple Gray Gelding by, Strathway out 
of a Thoroughbred Mare. 

MR. FRISCO Is 8 years old and SOUN D\ 

weighs 1050 lbs. He Is one of the grandest roau 
horses In America today. Fearless of all objects 
on road; a very fast walker; does not pull or lug 
on the bit; carries his head high; goes straight 
and never stumbles; will stand when tied and 
there is no road too long for him. He Is a good 
feeler and a good looker at all times, either be- 
fore or after driving. His speed qualities are 
phenomenal He never saw a race track until 
last spring, when he was sent to Mr. Al McDonald 
at the track at Pleasanton. who drove him a mile 
in 2:22%, last half In l:08(/ 3 , with only thirty 
days' training Mr. McDonald says he will trot 
a mile In 2:15 with three months' handling. The 
owner of this horse has to go East and has left 
the horse, buggy and harness In charge of Mr 
TLomas K(nney at the Fashion Stables, who rvill 
show the horse or outilt. 

THOMAS KINNEY, 
Fashion Stables, Ellis St., S. F. 



672-680 11th Ave. 
Back of The Chutes. 



All kinds of Horses 
bought and sold. 



THE ZIBBELL STABLE 

ZIBBELL & SON, Proprietors. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Boarding, Training and I •milling all kinds of 
Fanoy Horses. A few Nloe Rigs on hand. Take 
any car going to the Chutes. Tel.: West 269. 



Daedalion 2:10 For Sale. 

Can Beat His Record Three Times 
in a Race. 

Is entered at Fresno and ready to start. 
A high-class Race Horse and a Coming 81re. 

Sire, DIABLO 2:09 1-4. 

Dam GRACE (dam of Daedalion 

2:10, Creole 2:15, Eagle 2:19£, etc.) 

by Buccaneer. 

Owner's business will not permit him to devote 
any time to racing. For further particulars 
address 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



PARK HORSE FOR SALE. 

TTIGH-CLASS ROADSTER, COAL, BLACK 
- L - L 15 V4 hands, Ave years old, weighs 1000 pounds. 
Is a very handsome horse, a perfect beauty: fear- 
less of all things on the road: has been driven by 
a lady. Has lots of speed, but never trained on a 
track. Sound and all right. Sire and dam both 
registered. Apply to 

E. A. GRIGSBY, Napa, Cal. 



ABSORBIN 



Removes the inflammation and 
Bunch. Restores the Circulation 
in any Bruise or Thickened TiSBne, 
without blistering, removing the 
hair or laying horse up. Pleasantto 
use, clean and odorless. $2.00 per 
bottle delivered. Book No. 1 free. 

ABSORB1NE, JR., for mankind. 
$1.00 Bottle. Cures Bunions, 
Corns, Chilblains, Sprains, Etc. 
quickly. Genuine manufactured 
only by 



W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F., 
54 Monmouth Street. Springfield, Mass. 

For sale by Mack&Co Langley &MlchaelsCo. 
eadington & Co., J. O'Kane and J. A. McKerron, 
all of San Francisco 





McMURRAY 



nv 






JOG CART 

Especially adapted for 
Jogging-, Training and 
Matinie Driving. 

Price Low. 



McMURRAY SULKIES 

and JOGGING CARTS 

Standard the World Over. 
-OS-Address for printed matter and prices. 

W. J. Konney, 

531 Valencia St.,. San Francisco, Cal. 



O. F. WILLEY CO. 

(Established 1855) 

Carriage Builders and Dealers 
Harness, Robes and Whips. 

AGENTS FOR 

Brewster & Co , New York, of Broome St. 
KanfTman Buggy Co, Mlamlsborg, Ohio 
C. S, CafTrey Co , Camden, N. J. 
Connersvllle Buirgy Co , ConnersvlIIe. Ind. 
Watertown Carriage Co., Watertown. N. Y. 
Will bom ARlkerPony Vehicles, St. Paris, O. 

23-27 Hayes and 1 622-28 Market St. 

(Under St. Nicholas Hotel) 
Phone South 1062 SAN FRANCISCO 



HIGH CLASS STALLION FOR SALE. 

fiPFAT PFTFP BAT STALLION. 
^ rL,lL,l\ FIVE YEARS OLD 

Sire, Peter the Great 2:07(4 by Pilot Medium. 
First dam, Juanita 2:29 (dam of Slnaloa 2 253£) 

by Sultan, sire of Stamboul 2:07(4, etc. 
Second dam, lienlah (dam of Beuzetta 2:065^, 
Early Bird 2:10 and four more in the list) by 
Harold, sire of Maud S. 2:08J£. etc. 
Third dam, Sally B. (dam of Maurlne2:13J< and 
two more In the list) by Lever, thoroughbred 
son of the great race horse Lexington. 
Great Petkr Is a beautiful bay, 15.1 to 15.1(4 
hands high and one of the handsomest horses in 
California. He trotted a mile in 2-21 and half In 
1:07 as a three-year-old. Ho was put to pacing 
with the straps this year, and in a few weeks 
paced a mile in 2:11(4 at Los Angeles, with a 
quarter right at 30 seconds. He was then letup 
on as he had an attack of distemper. Is sound 
and all right now, and can probably show a mile 
in 2:12 to an intending purchaser. Will sell at a 
reasonable price or will deal with him In trade 
for a first-class trottor. Address 

ROBT. A. SMITH, 
2121 Park Grove'A venue, Los Angeles, Cal. 

A GOOD FILLY FOR SALE. 

HANDSOME TWO-YEAR-OLD FILLY BY 
11 Lochinvar 2:20, he by Director H. 2:27 by 
Director 2:17; first dam Myrtle by Sterling 6223; 
second dam Theresa by Prompter; third dam 
Empress by Flaxtall; fourth dam Lady Narley 
by Marion, son of Mambrino Chief II. this Ally 
Is well broken, perfectly sound, gocd galted and 
a first-class prospeot. For further particulars 
address J. D BLAMEY, 

Box 715, Grass Valley, Cal. 



Ross McMahon ftSJ* 

Truck, Wagon and Horse Covers, Gamp Furniture, etc. 

reasonable PMOBg, "gSS 1 Bmh ess) 35 MARKET ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

CRAFT'S 

DISTEMPER 




50c anil 
W1.00 a 
bottle. 



CURE 

Cures Distemper and Coughs. Free booklet. 

Wells Medicine Go. ££0%$ 13 3d st, Lafayette, Ind. 

D E. NEWELL. General Agent for Paelile Coast 510 Mission St., San Francisco, Cal 




RED BALL BRAND. 



A wanl.MlUoldMedal 
At CallfomlaState 
Kalr IK02. 

JSvory horse owner who 
values his stock should 
constantly have a sup- 
ply of it on hand, ft 
Improves and keeps 
stock in the pink of 
Icondltlon. 

rianbaltan Pood Co 

1 253 Folsom St., San Francisco 
Ask your grocers or dealers for It. 



Po3itlvolv Cores Colic, Scouring and Indigestion. 



P. P. KEBTELL, Manager. 



[JOLY 29, I960 




.Oot 1o 



THE BAYWQOD STUD 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAL 

(Property of John Parbott, Esq.) 
Devoted Exclusively to the Breeding and Training of 

High Stepping 
Hackney Bred 
Harness Horses 

WALTER SEAL!, Manager. 



THE HOME OF 



McKINNEY, 8818, 2:11% 

The libprecedented World's Leading Sire of Extreme Race 
Horse Speed. Fee, $300 until May 1 0th, after which no 
* - bookings will be accepted for less than the advanced fee of $500. 



Prince Favorite, 38076, 

TRIAL (3) 2:21; HALF IN 1:09; QUARTER IN :34. 

Son of The Beau Ideal. 2:15)4, and Princess Chimes dam of 
Lady of the Manor, 2:04%. :::::::::::: 



This National Horse Show Prize Winner is conceded by many to be 
prospectively the finest stallion ever bred at Village Farm. Fee, $ 1 00. 



WC 



Tee* are invariably payable before mares leave the farm. No 
return privilege, but fees returned if mare fails to have a colt. 
^Keep, $2. per week. Our terms are rigidly adhered to in all 
cases artd we cannot accept any deviation from them. : : : 



Rmdly mention this journal 'TT L7 /"^i. L? 

when wriung and address 1 he LlTipire UlV t aiTnS, 



CUBA. 
N. Y. 



-13> 



75 PER CENT 



OF ALL HORSE OWNERS 
AND TRAINERS 



USE AND RECOMMEND 



CampbelFsHorsB Foot Remedy 

SOLD BY 

SAYRE & SON Sacramento, Cal 

R. T. FRAZIER Pueblo, Colo 

J. G. READ & BRO Ogden, Utah 

JUBINVILLE & NANCE Butte, Mont 

A. A. KRAFT CO SpokaDe, Wa8h 

A. F. HOSKA HARNESS CO — Tacoma, Wash 
McSORLEY & HENDERSON.... Seattle, Wash 

C. RODDER Stockton, Cal 

WM. E. DETELS Pleasanton, Cal 

W. C. TOPPING San Diego, Cal 

JEPSEN SADDLERY CO Los Angeles, Cal 

H. THORWALDSON Fresno, Cal 

JOS. McTIGfJE San Francisco, Cal 

BRYDON BROS. HARNESS MFG CO 

Los Angeles, Cal 

JAS. B CAnPBELL&CO.. Manufacturers, 412 W.nadlson St., CHICAGO ,ILL 




\Jhree Legged Horses' 

* t-rt, not curiosities by any ii ' in s. The country is full of them. The 
fi.urth leg is there all riirht hut it is not worth anything because of a curb, 
splint, spavin or other like bunch. "Vou can cure the horse of any of these 
'ailments and put anolhtr found log under him by the use of 

Qu inn's Ointment. 



It is time tried and reliable. When & home t« cured 
wiiiiyulnn'H Ointment he stars cured. Mr. E.F.Burke 
olSpnnu'lleM,Mo.,writesasioi:ows- *'I hare been 
ueinirQulnn't Ointment for several years and have ef- 
fected many marvelous cures; It will tfo deeper and" 
causeless pain than any blister I ever used. ThouKht 
it my duty for the benefit of homes to recommend your 
iii iment, 1 am never w it hout it " This is thejren*ral 
vi t diet by all who ftl ve Qufnn'a Ointment a Mat For 
curbs, splints, sp^vi ns. wiudpufTs. and aU bunches It 
is uneqinileil. prico • 1 per bottle at all druntrfRts 
or sent by mail. Send for circulars, testimonials, &e. 

W. B. Eddy & Co., Whitehall. N. Y. 



.1 



VICTOK VER1LHAC 

Proprietor 
JAMES M. McGRATH 

Manager 



DEXTER PRINCE STABLES 

TRAINING, BOARDING AND SALE 

Oor. of Grove and Baker 8treets, Ju-i at the Panhandle Entrance to Golden Gate Park 
(Take Hayes, MoAUlster or Devlsadero Street Cars) 

Best located and healthiest Stable In Sa:s Francisco. Always a good roadster on hand for 
sale. Careful and experienced man to oare for un<l oxeroise park roadsters and prepare horses for 
track use. Ladies can go and return to stable d not have their horses frightened by automobile* 

or cars. 



Deposit Your 
Idle Funds 



wim THE 




any 



of California 



42 Montsromery. St. 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



You can open a Savings Account 
by mail with any sum 
large or small. 

INTEREST PAID SEMI-ANNUALLY 

3 1-4% on Ordinary Savings 
3 6-10% on Term Savings 

Bend for Booklet, 
"THE SURE WAY TO WEALTH." 



TfteylicKIt^i 

As tncy wa.nt it. lg» 

COMPRESSED yg/r 

PURE-SALT BRICKS 
PATENT FEEDERS. 

j/ m fjhe sane, economical, handy 
T&m^p way of salting animals. 
"Mmk Ash. Dealers. 
IgjgKL W'r//e iv* for Booh. 

^dELMONI 5ME SllPPlYti). 

PATENTEES MANUFACTURERS- BROOKLYN, N.Y 



HEALDS 



BUSINESS COLLEGE 
24 Post Street* San Francisco, Cal, 



The oldest, the largest, the most popular com- 
nerola) school on the Pacific Coast. 20.000 gradu- 
ates: 90 teaohers: 70 typewriters; over 300 students 
tnnually placed In positions. Send for catalogue. 



E. P. HKALD. President. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

IMPROVED 

STALLION SERVICE BOOKS 

(POCKET SIZE) 

100 Pages. Price $1, postpaid. 

Most Complete Book 
of the kind published. 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 
36 Geary St.. San Francisco. 




QOCOANUT OIL CAKE 

THE BEST FEED FOB 

STOCK, CHICKENS AND PIOS 

FOB SALE IN LOTS TO SDIT BY 

EL DORADO LINSEED OIL WORKS CO. 

208 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



CALIFORNIA 

NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY 

Through Picturesque California. 

The Ideal Route for 

Tlie Aogler and OntlDE Trins 

One day's ride from San Francisco take' 
you to some of the tinest Tront Streams in the 

State. Along the line and within easy distance 
are many of the best Springs and Summer Resorts 
in the State. The Company maintains a Fish 
Hatchery and annually stocks the many streams 
reached by its road. One million Trout Fry were 
planted last year In these streams. 

Black Bass Fishing can be enjoyed In Russian 
River near Guernevllle, Guernewood Park and 
Camp Vacation, In season. 

The best Striped Bass Fishing waters on the 
Coast reached by the Tiburon Ferry. 

VACATION FOB 1905 

Issued annuallj by the Company, is now read?. 
'I'll is Is the standard publication on the Coast for 
Information regarding Mineral SprlDgs. Resorts, 
Country Homes and Farms where summer board- 
ers are taken, and Solect Camping Spots. 

Beautifully Illustrated, 150 pp. and can be had 
In response to mall requeKt or at ticket offices. 

Ticket Offices-650 Market Street (Chronicle 
Bldg) acd Tiburon Ferry, foot of Market Street. 

General Office— Mutual Life Ins Bldg., cor. 
Sansome and California Sts., San Francisco. 

JAS. L. FRAZIER, R. X. RYAN, 

Gen. Mgr. Gen. Pass. Afct. 



PHENOL S0DIQUE 

lieals . 

CUTS, BURNS 
and SORES. 

THE BEST 
Antiseptic 
Dressing 
for 

&0LfaDla§ MauorBeast - 

Ke p handy for emer. 

rzA gencles in home 
29 and stable. 




55x3 



"^CE BROTl'tTRS * WHITE. 



Equally good for dogs 
and all animals. 



If not at your drug- 
gists, small size sent 
■ to any address upon 

~" receipt of 10c. 

HANCE BROTHERS & WHITE 

Pharmaceutical Chemists 
PHILADELPHIA CHICAGO 



TRAINING AND BOARDING STABLES 

DEVISADERO AND FULTON STREETS. 

(1308 Fnltou Street) 

Business Horses For Hire. 

I have opened a new Boarding and Training 
Stable near the above corner, and will board and 
train for racing, road use or matinee driving a 
limited number of first-class horses at reasonable 
rates. Have good locution , brand-new stable and 
everything nrst-olass. All horses in my care will 
receive the best of attention. 

T. C. CABNEY. i 

Telephone: Page 4147. 



Chronic Bronchitis and Catarrh ol the Bladder 
Cored In 48 Hoars. 



Srd% 

CAP S.ULES 



f 



Superior to Copaiba, CnbetM or Injection 



Photo Engraving Company 

HIGH CLASS ART 
IN 

Halt Tones and Line Engraving 

Artistic Designing. 
606 Mission St., cor First, San Francisco 



JULY 29, 19051 



THE CONSOLATION HANDICAP 



at tlxc 



Held at Indianapolis, June 27-30, 1905. was won by Mr. Jas. T. Atkinson of Newcastle, Pa , score 09 out of 100 from the ls-yard mark, using 

PETERS FACTORY LOADED SHELLS 

This was the Only Event During the Entire Grand American which was won from Behind the 
16 yard Line. Many other Notable Scores were made with Peters Shells, among them the following: 
I st on Practice Day, F. M. See (tie), 99 out of 100. 1st on First Day, L. H. Reld (tie), 99 out of 100. 2d In Preliminary, Wm Vcach (tie), 97 out of 100. 3d In Grand American, M. Arle (tie), 97 out of 100. 

In the Consolation Handicap, 2 scores of 98, 5 of 97, 4 of 96 and U5 others above 00 woro made with Peters Shells. 

All of which merely goes to prove that Peters Shells are WINNERS. 

THE PETERS CARTRIDGE CO., Cincinnati, Ohio 



New York: 98 Chambers Street, T. H. KELLER, Manager. 



SHREVE & BARBER 

PIONEER DEALERS 

739 
Market St. 

Send for 
Catalogue 




CO. 

521 
Kearny St. 

Mail Orders 
a Specialty 



GUNS, AMMUNITION, FISHING-TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS 

SAN FRANCISCO, • • • CALIFORNIA. 



LOOK 
UP 



YOUR 
GUN 




YOC may need a new one this fall; DO NOT wait until yon want 
It. OKOER NOW. BEMEMBEK It takes time to make a gun and 
make one RIGHT. We do not care to make one any other way. 
If vim DON'T know all about a goo write to as; we may be able 
to serve JUST YOIT. We have had over forty years' experience, and it's youth for the 
asking. Tell us what you want Write to-day. 



32 Warren St., New York City. 



30 Cherry St., Meriden, Conn. 



"Billy" Crosby has held the world's 
long run record of 345 straight 
since March 31, 1901, 

and 

now makes another world's record 
of 419 straight WITH HIS SMITH 
3-UN. You can't miss them with 
the Smith. 

Send fox* Catalogue. 

HUNTER ARMS CO., Fulton, N. .Y 





NEW MODEL 
AUTOMATIC 
EJECTOR 



We Make 16 Orades, $17 75 to $300. 

THE ITHACA GUN 

Coast Branch, PHIL B. BEKEART CO., 



Write for ART CATALOQ to 

CO., Ithaca, N. Y. 

14 Second .St., San Francisco 



Ballistite Wins! 

.b,vxi2 3-k.H If 



Both the High Amateur and General Average 

AND ALSO THE 

Phil B. Bekeart Challenge Trophy- 100" Bird s- 

At the Second Annual Tournament of the Pacific Coast Trap 
Shooters Association, Ingleside, May 28, 29, 30, were won with 

IB ALDISTITE. 

If You Have Not Yet Tried It, Do So. You Will Like It. 




BAKER & HAMILTON 



II 



SAN 



PACIFIC COAST AGENTS 
FRANCISCO SACRAMENTO 



s properly tlie sensitive mechani; 

/With perfect action the reel never fails at at 
:ritical moment. " 3 in One '* wont gum, dry ( 
nit, contains no acid. "3 in One " prevents ' 
rust on every part, add- 
ing years to (he life, and 
brightness to the beauty . 
of even the finest. Good 
f<»r the rod too — preserves 
the wood, promoting' plia- 
bility—protects the metal. 
eC%'VW Good for fisher also— the 
\_J | |j . 1 ._' I i c a t e , pleasant odor ) 

keeps oiF toosquftoftf 
Try it. All dealers. Trial bottle sent free. 
Write to 

G. W. COLE CO. 
128 Washington Life Hldg 
■■ t York City 



REAL 
REEL 



BREEDERS' DIRECTORY. 



"HOWARD SHORTHORNS' — QUINTO 
HERD — 77 premiums, California State Fairs 
1902-3-4. Registered cattle of beef and milking 
families for sale. Write us what you want. 
Howard Cattle Co , 206 Sansome Street, San 
Francisco. 



PETKK 9AXE & SON. Liok House, S. F..Cal. 
Importers, Breeders and Dealers for past 30 years. 
All varieties Cattle, Horses, Sheep, Hogs. High- 
class breeding stock. Correspondence solicited. 



HOLSTEIN8— BUTTER BRED FAMILIES. 
Work herd; 90% winners at Statu and county fairs, 
show ring, and every butter conte.it since 1885 in 
California No reservations. Stock near S. F 
F. H Burke, 30 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 



JERSEYS, HOLSTEIN8 AND DURHAM8. 
Dairy Stock specially. Hogs, Poultry. Estab- 
lished 1878. William Nlles & Co. I ■"- Angeles 
Oal 



VETERINARY. 



m>x*. W m, F*. Esau. 

M. R. O. V. S., F. E. V. M. S. 

VETERINARY SURGEON. 

Member of the Royal College of Vetorlnan 
Surgeons, England; Fellow of the Edlnburi 
Veterinary Medical Society; Graduate of the New 
Veterinary College Edinburgh; Veterinary Sur- 
geon to the 8. F. Flro Department; Live Stock 
Inspector forNew Zealand and AustrallanColonlea 
at the port of San Francisco; Professor of Equine 
Medicine, Veterinary Surgery, Veterinary Depart- 
ment University of California: Ex-President ni 
the California State Veterinary Medical Associa- 
tion; Veterinary Infirmary, Regldenoe and Office, 
San Francisco Veterinary Hospital. 1117 Oolden 
Oate Avenue, near Webster St., San Franolaco: 
Telephone Park 188. 



IF YOU WISH TO ADVERTISE 

IN NEWSPAPERS 

ANYWHERE AT ANYTIME 
Call on or Write 

E.C.DAKE'S ADVERTISING AGENCY 

124 Sansome Street 



I 



AT STUD. 

Ch. CUBA OP KENWOOD 

(Glenbetee Jr.-Stalla) 

CUBA JR. 

(Ch. Cuba of Kenwood- Florida) 
One of lhn highest class Field Trial winners In 
America. Seven wins In nine Trials before be 
was two years old. 

STOGKD ALE KENNELS 

R. M. DODGE, Manager, 
Kakerafleld, Kern Co., 
Boarding. Pointer Puppies and well-broken 
Dogs for sale 

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 



Advertisements under this head one cent per word 
per insertion. Cash to accompany order. 



FOINTK K S 



I^OR SALE — THOROUGHBRED POINTERS, 
1 six months old; yard broken; not gun shy. 



D. E. MARTIN. Llvermore. 



COLLIES 



rpREMENDOUS BARGAINS IN COLLIES. 
1 Send In order and get the very best at bottom 
price. GLEN TANA COLLIE KENNELS, P. 
O. Box 1907 Spokane, Wash. 



T he Cocker Spaniel 

Its History, Points. 
Standard, Care, 
Training, Etc 

PRICE, POSTPAID, 50 CENTS 

The instructions on Care, Training, etc., apply 
toothor breeds as well as to Cockers, and It (1 a 
useful book for the drg owner. Tells how to 
teach them to perform tricks. 

FOR SALE BY THE 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



BLAKE, M0FFITT & T0YVNE 



-DEALERS IN- 



55-57-59-61 First Street, S. 

Telephone Main I9J 

CALIFORNIA 



F. 



PEDIGREES TABULATED 

And type written 
Ready for framing. 
Write for prices. 

Bheeubh and Sportsman. m Gear; .-in 1 1 
sjaa KrauciHOO. Cml 



16* 



f July 29, 1905 



TELEPHONE* 

South 640 




ORSE BOOTS 




AMMUNITION 

The enthusiastic hunter is enthusiastic 
about U. M, C. cartridges. The wider 
his experience, the louder his praise. 

The hunter who has "tried them all" 
is now using U. M. C. cartridges, and 
recommends them to his friends, 

Write fob Illustrated Catalog. 

PACIFIC COAST depot: 

86-88 FIRST ST.,S. F. 





AMMUNITION 

No matter what make or model of rifle 
you use, U. M, C. cartridges will give 
superior results, Buy just the right 
cartridges for your gun— U. M. C. car- 
tridges. Every dealer, city or country, 
sells U. M. C. 

Write for Illustrated Catalog. 

PACIFIC coast depot: 
E. E. DRAKE, - ■ Manager 



TflNCHESm 

.^ivLivtrjivriTionvr, riflss, shotguns 

WERE AWARDED THE 

ONLY GRAND PRIZE 



BY THE SUPERIOR JURY AT THE ST. LOUIS EXPOSITION, 1904. 



The Official Records Show 

that at the 
GRAND AMERICAN HANDICAP 
Indianapolis, Ind., June 27-30, 

Du PONT SMOKELESS 

won everyone of the 

EIGHT PRIZES 

(Grand American Handicap, Preliminary 
Handicap, Consolation Handicap and 
the Five Men State Team 
Championship) 

and 

MORE THAN FIFTY PER CENT OF 
THE TOTAL PURSES 



C. P. W. BR ANDS. 

SMOKELESS SHOTGUN SHELLS. 

PATTERN 

PERFECTION 

INVINCIBLE 

Loaded with Any Standard Brand of 
Smokeless Powder. 

When ordering from your dealer mention OUR BRANDS 
and kind of Powder wanted. 

We guarantee our loading. 

California Powder Works 

Wells-Fargo Bldg,, 49 Second St 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



General Average 

For the Tournament at Indianapolis 
won by 

W. R. Crosby 
with a score of 298 ex 300, using 

New E. C. Improved 

"Fred A. Stone Soarescrow Trophy 1 ' 
which was awarded the 
High Professional 
in the 

Grand American Handicap 
won by 
W. G. Hearne 
using 

"INFALLIBLE" Smokeless 

LAFLIN & RAND POWDER CO. 



J 



Clabrough, Golcher & Go, 



RUNS 
Sun Goods 

JWSend for Catalogue. 




FISHING 
Tackle 



538 MARKET STREET, S. F. 



These are the Brands of 

FACTORY . . . O 1—1 n I C 
LOADED . . O PILL Lw 

PACIFIC 

CHALLENGE 

SUPERIOR 

EXCELSIOR 





LOU MILTON 

Dam of Lou Dillon 1:58J and Three More in the List 

This picture Is from a photograph taken at Santa Rosa Stock Farm In 1904. Tho mare iHjheld by Mr. Mart Rollins of Santa Rosa, 
whose persistent advooacy of the mare's t'roat qualities Induced Pierce Bros, to buy her. 



2 



[August 6, 1906 



Starting Payments Due 

AUGUST 7, 1905. 

Pacific Breeders Futurity Stakes 
HNTos. Q and 3. 



Three-Year-Olds 



(FOALS Or 1902) 

On Pacers 

On Trotters 



$35 
$50 



Money Divided: 



Two-Year-Olds 

(FOALS OF 1903) 

On Pacers $25 
On Trotters $35 

Money Divided: 

Two-Year-Old Trottera H12SO 

Two Year-Old Pacers 760 

Nominator Dam of Winner Trot 200 

Nominator Dim of Winner Face 200 

Owner of Stallion, aire of Winner of Three- Year-Old Trot, when mare waa bred SI OO 
Owner of Stallion, aire of Winner of Three-Year-Old rare, whtn mare waa bred . 100 

Nominators must designate, when making- payments to start, whether the 
horse entered is a trotter or a pacer. 

Two-Year-Olds that start are not barred from starting again in the 
Three Year-Old divisions. 



Three-Year-Old Trottera S2000 

Three-Year-Old Facers 1000 

Nominator Dam of Winner Trot 200 

Nominatoi Dam of Winner Pace 200 



E. P. HEALD, President. 



F. W. KELLEY, Secretary, 

36 GEARY 8T . SAN FRANCISCO. 



—r £- nr n C" l\l T OF ALL h °k se owners 
f O i Ln wELlM I and trainers 

USE AND RECOMMEND 

Campbell'sHorseFootRemedy 

SOLD BY... 

SAYRE & SON Sacramento, Cal 

R. T. FRAZIER Pueblo, Colo 

J. G. READ & BRO Ogden, Utah 

JUBINVILLE & NANCE Butte, Mont 

Wb4^ A A " kraft co Spokane, Wash 

'* A. F. HOSKA HARNESS CO.. . .Tacoma, Wash 
^CTP WMi^Q McSORLEY & HENDERSON.... Seattle, Wash 

««"5jFootleHay IfflfUMf C. RODDER Stockton, Cal 

•E^V mmr$\ WM- E ' DETELS Pleasanton, Cal 

'tJt^T Wm0W W ' c - TOPPING San Diego, Cal 

l^^r^it fmf^m JEPSEN SADDLERY CO Los Angeles, Cal 

^■^^^^fm^M^k H. THORWALDSON Fresno, Cal 

• - - 1 JOS. McTIGCTE San Francisco, Cal 

BRYDON BROS. HARNESS MFG CO 

Los Angeles, Cal 

JAS. B. CAHPBELL &C0., Manufacturers, 412 W.Hadison St.,CHlCAQO , ILL 




Quinns Oinrment 



Will Make A Horse Over; 

Will pi t Fourd legs under him and 

w ill save him from the cheap hawker and trader It is the 
standard cure for Spavins, Curbs, Splints. Windpuffa and all 
the various lumps and bunches of like kind. K>-i p it always on 
hand and you will be prepared when trouble comes. Leading 
horsemen everywhere know it and use it. 

Mr. M. H. Clark, Fredonla. K. Y-. writes, "The bottle of 
Qulnn'a Ointment purchased from you about two years ago 
removed a curb and thorough pin aud did It fur good. My 
horse's leg is as smooth as ever." 

Price $1.00 per bottle. Sold by all druggists or sent by mail' 

Write for circulars, testimonials, etc. 

W.B. EDDY A COMPANY, WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



VICTOR VERILHAC 

Proprietor 
JAMES M. McGRATH 

Manager 



DEXTER PRINCE STABLES 

TRAINING, BOARDING AND SALE 

Cor of drove and Baker Streets, just at the Panhandle Entrance to Golden Uate Park 

(Take Hayes, McAllister or Devisadero Street Cars) 

Best located and healthiest Stable In San Francisco. Always a good roadster on hand for 
sale. Careful and experienced men to care for and exercise park roadsters and prepare horses for 
track use. Ladles can go and return to stable d not have their horses frightened by automobl I es 
or cars. 



mm 



AT TAN 

kfoOD. 



BRAND. 



Awarded Gold Medal 
I At California State 
Fair 1892. 

[Every horse owner who 
values his stock should 
constantly have a sup- 
ply of it on hand. It 
[Improves and keeps 
[stock in the pink of 
(condition. 

risohattan Food Co 

1253 Folaom St., San FrancUoo 
ABk your grocers or dealers for It. 



Positivelv Cures Colic, Scouring and Indigestion. 

C. P. KERTELL, Manager. 



TOOMBY 

TWO WHEELERS 

ARE THE LEADERS, 

Sulkies in All Sizes. 
Pneumatic 
Road and Track Carta. 

Pneumatic Pole Carts 

for Team Work on both Road 
and Track. 

High Wheel Jog Carts, 

Long Shift Breaking Carts. 

Send for latest Catalogue to 

S. TOOMEY & CO. 

Canal Dover, Ohio, U. S. A. 




Jersey" Cut=Under Truck 



ThlsTruck is the result of years of endeavor to produce a wagon that has great 
carrying capacity, ample strength without superfluous weight, low 
enough to the ground to minimize the labor of loading. 
Can turn short among trees, and can be used on 
the roads as well as on the farm. 
The "Jersey" is a pronounced success, not only for the transportation of fruit, 
but as a general purpose dray ln villages and small cities. 



16-18 DBUMM ST., 



SAN FRANCISCC 



PHONE PARK 162 



A. J. MARTIN, Prop 



START ■ 

BOARDING AND LIVERY 
1530 IT" IE! ZjIIi street 



BEST OF ACCOMMODATIONS. 
CALL AND SEE FOR YOURSELF. 



BET. I. YON AND CENTKL AVE. 

Hayes St Cara Pass the Door 




Liui 



'n Tl nmfTinfi rtTI T i llim n n ♦ Tne Createat Rem- 
edy Ever Known 
Fur Bad Legs. 

It psnetrato to the seat of trouble at once. It allays fever from any 
cause! A Safe, Speedy and Positive Cure for splints, Curlia. Thorough- 
pin'. Sweeny. Capped Ilocka. Wind Puffa and all Lameness from 
Spralna. Rlngbnne and other biny enlargements On broken down, weak 
aDd Injured tendons, r'iptured ligaments Its power Is unfailirjg. Perma- 
nently cures all broken down conditions of the AokWs. Ilorka. Tendon* 
or Ligaments, without loss or hair or an hour's let up on the h r.»e 

PRICE S3 FEK BUTTLE Express charges prepaid on receipt of 
price. Every bottle guaranteed to give satisfaction or money refunded. 

THE F. A. WILCOXSON REMEDY CO , Tiffin O , U 8. A. 



£ PALACE HOTEL, 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 



TOURISTS and TRAVELERS will, now, with difficulty recognize the famous COURT 
Into which for twenty-fl e years carriages have driven. This spaoe of over a quarter 
of an acre has recently, by the addition of very handsome furniture, rugs, chandeliers 
and tropical plants, been converted Into a lounging room— the FINEST IN THE 
WORLD. 

The EMPIRE PARLOR— the PALM ROOM, furnished in Cerise, with Billiard and 
Pool tables for the ladles— the LOUIS XV PARLOR the LADIES WRITING ROOM 
and numerous other modern Improvements, together with the unexcelled Cuisine and the 
Most Convenient Location in the City— all add much to the ever increasing popularity 
of this most famous HOTEL. 



3 



Ross McMahon B3£* 

Truck, Wagon and Horse Covers, Gamp Furniture, etc. 



GOOD WORK. PROMPT 8EKVICE. 
REASONABLE PRICES. (Phone: Bush 858) 



35 MARKET ST., SAN FRANCISCO 



OB API'S DISTEMPEB CUBE 

FORMULA OF DR GEO. R. CRAFT 

Craft'- Liquid Distemper Cure owes Its distinctive value to tbe proportions 
o! its contained Ingredients and the manner of their combination. All Imi- 
tations lack tbe characteristics of the original, and are consequently of in- 
ferior value. See that you out Ciiaft's. Accept no other. Atdrugglsts, 
turf goods hou-es,or direct prepaid Price 50c ami* I a bottle. Free booklet. 

Wells Medicine Co, S^Wi - 13 3d st, Lafayette, Ind, 

D, E. NEWELL, General Agent for Pacific Coast. 610 Mission St., San Francisco, Cal 




August 5, 1905] 



3 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

F. W. KELLEY, PROPRIETOR. 

Turf and Sporting Authority ot the Pacific Coast. 

— OFFICE — 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O BOX 2300. 
Telephone: Black 586. 



ermi- One Year 83, Six Months 81.75, Three Mouths 81 
STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money snould be sent by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
iddressed to F. W. Kelley, 38 Geary St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee 
of good faith. 



San Francisco, Saturday, August 5, 1905 



SANTA ROSA is now headquarters for all the 
trotters and pacers that are being raced on the 
California circuit. All the fast ones are there, in- 
cluding Zolock 2:05}, the fastest horse on the Pacific 
Coast. Probably the two hundred box stalls at Santa 
Rosa Stock Farm track are all filled bj this time, as 
last Saturday but very few vacant ones were left. On 
Wednesday of next week the Sonoma Driving Club 
will give a benefit to Willard Zibbell, a good program 
of racing being promised for this the initial meeting 
of the new club. A more worthy cause could not be 
be found for the first attempt of this club at giving a 
race meeting, and as tickets have been sold to a great 
many people there will be a large attendance. This 
benefit will whet the appetites of horsemen for toe 
splendid program which the Pacific Coast Trotting 
Horse Breeders Association will open one week later. 
There has been no meeting held on this coast in years 
that has been looked forward to with as much inter- 
est as this one. The high class of the entries to the 
class events, and the known and unknown qualities 
of the colts and fillies that will start in the four rich 
stakes are subjects of discussion wherever horsemen 
are assembled. People are coming from all parts of 
the State to attend this meeting at Santa Rosa, and 
they will not be disappointed, as the racing is bound 
to be good, the tii e fast, and the citizens of the town 
ready to give all visitors a most hospitable reception. 
Santa Rosa is growing very fast, new residences 
and business blocks being very numerous. The 
climate is one of Santa Rosa's proudest boasts and 
sunny days and cool nights are certain. The best 
vacation for a lover of horses to take is to visit Santa 
Rosa during the Breeders meeting which opens 
August 16th 



THE HORSES belonging to the estate of the late 
Michael Fox will be sold at private sale by the 
executor whose advertisement appears in another 
oolumn of this issue. The list is headed by the well 
known Masedo, a winner of the majority of his starts 
both at New York and in California. Masedo was one 
of the sensational two-year olds of 1903 winning a good 
race and running Boxwood to a head in the Laureate 
Stake, five furlongs in :59:{ and defeating Highball, 
Greencrest and other good ones. Reseda II the dam 
of Masedo will be sold in this lot She is by Midlo. 
thiau from Marigold by Luke Blackburn and is in foal 
to Orsini a 6on of Ormonde and Jongleuse. The well 
known broodmare Fanny Louise by Darebin-Nellie 
Peyton will also be offered. Fanny Louise was a good 
race mare herself and is the dam of the well known 
stake winners Canmore, Andrisa and Sister Jeanie. 
She is a young mare and was bred to St. Carlo this 
year and ha9 proved herself to be a prod ucer of high 
class race horses. 

There are two weanling fillies in the lot one by St. 
Carlo from Reseda II and the other by Orsini from 
Fanny Louise which should prove good prospects if 
looks and breeding count for anything. The yearlings 
are a bay colt by Kenilworth from EdnaRose adaugh- 
ter of Reseda II and a bay filly by Orsini from Fanny 
Louise; and one in search of good racing prospects 
should not fail to make a bid on these foals as they 
are on looks and conformation the best lot that have 
been offered in the local market this season. 



WESTCHESTER RACING ASSOCIATION an- 
nounces in our business columns this week, 
many»stakes to close August 15th for its Autumn 
Meeting. Belmont Park where these races will he 
run is the finest race course in America The 6takes 
announced are for two-year-olds, three-year-olds, two- 
year olds and upwards and three-year-olds and up- 
wards, besides weight for age races and several 
steeple-chase events. In all the stakes the amount of 



added money is large and the subscriptions very 
small. A full list of these stakes with conditions will 
be found in the advertisement. We would call the at- 
tention of all owners and breeders of thoroughbreds to 
the statement of the Westchester Racing Association 
that the fixed events for now yearlings, to run when 
two years old in 1906, when three years old in 1907, 
and for foals of 1905 to run in 1908 will be duiy an- 
nounced to close September 15th, 1905, viz: in 1906, 
The Juvenile, The Fashion, The Eclipse. 1907, The 
Withers, The Ladies, The 41st Belmont for now year- 
lings. 1908, The 42d Belmont for foals of 1905. The 
Tenth National Stallion Race of 1904 will close for 
stallions at the same time. 



Starting payments are duo 
Next Monday, August 7th, 1905 
In the Pacific Breeders' Futurity Stakes 
For two and three year olds. 



Willard Zibbell Is Married, 

The following from the San Francisco Cull of 
August 1st, will interest all of our readers who have 
read of the fearful accident at Fresno on July 12th. 

Oakland, July 21— Out of the West there came 
tolay a modern Locbinvar to claim a bride. It was a 
twentieth century weddiDg with a vengeance that was 
celebrated this afternoon in Oakland when bride, 
groom, witnesses and the officiating knot-tier sallied 
forth in an automobile and celebrated the ceremony 
in the big touriQg car on the street corner. Willard 
Rush Zibbell and Georgie Kempfer were the coatract- 
ing parties. 

In the large machine with the "chug chug" of the 
the wheels for accompaniment, Justice of the Peace 
W. R. Geary pronounced the words that united Zib- 
bell and his bride. The witnesses who sat in the for- 
ward seat with a chauffeur were J. W. Zibbell and 
Mrs. Dora Zibbell, the groom's father and mother, 
and Miss Ena Zibbell, his sister. The groom is a 
horseman of some note, and is a member of the firm 
of Zibbell & Son, proprietors of the Zibbell stable, 672 
Eleventh avenue, San Francisco. The bride is also a 
resident of the city across the bay, whence came the 
bridal party in the automobile today. 

The wedding occurred at the corner of Sixth and 
Castro streets at 4:30 o'clock. Shortly before that 
time Justice Geary was summoned to the County 
Clerk's office by a message which announced that his 
services would be required at a marriage ceremony. 

When the Justice arrived he was introduced to the 
automobile party, and was in vited to jump in for a 
ride. It was explained to Judge Geary that the bride 
and groom did not desire to leave the machine, so a 
quick run was made to Sixth and Castro streets as a 
convenient and quiet spot for the ceremony. Qu'.ckly 
the event was concluded, and Justice Geary left the 
machine, waving adieu to the bridal party as the 
autcmobile faded away in the cloud of dust, headed 
back for San Francisco. 

Around the unique wedding is a touch of unusual 
sentiment and pathos. On July 12th Zibbell was in 
Fresno with a friend. While walking across the rail- 
road track one night they were struck by a train at 
the crossing. The friend was killed and Zibbell was 
crippled for life. His le ft arm was cut off, his right 
hand was severed and his left leg was cut off. Ho also 
suffered internal injuries which for many days left 
him hovering between life and death. The injured 
man was nursed back to lifo by careful and attentive 
effort. 

The most anxious of all during this time was the 
young man's sweetheart, Mrs. Kempfer, to whom ho 
was engaged to be married. Many days passed beforo 
word was at last given that Zibbell would live. 

"Who, "it was asked, "should have a better right 
to care for this unfortunate man than the woman who 
was to be his wife?" 

It was all talked over among the Zibbells. The 
young man was sure he did not want his sweotheart 
to make the sacrifice. She, with a loyal heart and in- 
sistence that could not be broken, declared she must 
take her place at her lover's side as his wife. Only in 
that capacity could she be his helpmeet in his hour of 
sore need and trial. 

So the arguments ran until the plucky woman, like 
most of her sisters, had her own way. Then it was a 
problem, in view of Zibbell's condition, to have the 
marriage celebrated without und ue notice. They de- 
cided to come to Oakland, hoping that hero it could 
be arranged quietly. The family desired to bo present. 
A procession of hacks was not wanted, and Zibbell's 
condition was such that ho could not travel in tho 
ordinary way by boat and train. The automobile 
solved the case. A friend of Mr. Zibbell's kindly 
offered the use of his machino. 

Without any publicity tho Zibbells and tho brido 
formed tho party that headed for Oakland this after- 



noon. Without delay the trip was made to the Hal[ 
of Records, where the necessary license and the equally 
necessary Justice of the Peace were brought into 
service. In the brief explanation that was made 
while the Justice was on the way to the rendezvous, 
he was told that owing to the groom's crippled con- 
dition he could not leave the machine. Judge Geary 
rapidly made a mental review of the law of the State 
of California on the subject of marriage. He could 
remembernothiogthat prevented him from officiating 
in an automobile, so long as the contracting parties 
were legally qualified. Without any ado he joined in 
the spirit of the occasion • nd sent away the happy 
couple with his judicial biessing. 



Sonoma County Driving Club. 

The new driving club organized by the horsemen of 
Sonoma county has started out right by joining the 
National Trotting Association and all matinee and 
other racing under the club's auspices will be accord- 
ing to rule. 

At a meeting held tho other evening at Santa Rosa 
it was decided to give a benefit on Wednesday of next 
week to Willard Zibbell, the unfortunate trainer who 
lost his limbs in the awful railroad accident at Fresno 
July 12th. 

The benefit will take the form of a race meet and 
some of the best horses at the track will start on the 
occasion and it is hoped that a handsome sum will be 
realized for the benefit of the unfortunate young man. 

A Committee on Speed Program was named consist- 
ing of F. Wright of Sacramento, John Albertson of 
Fresno and W. H. Lumsden of Santa Rosa. 

The horsemen are all very enthusiastic over the 
meeting. They are all very anxious to do what they 
can for Zibbell, and they want the puMic to assist 
them and in return promise an excellent card. Zibbell 
is quite well known in Santa Rosa. He resided there 
once and so did his parents. The general spirit which 
moves the horsemen in this effort is a very worthy 
le. Henry Carlton, secretary of the Sonoma County 
Driving Club will take an active part in the arrange- 
ments. 

Some twenty horses have already been entered to 
start. There will be two or three races between 
horses owned by members of the Sonoma Driving 
Club and all the fastest horses at the track will be 
driven exhibition, miles, halves or quarters. 

The officers of the new club are P. H. Quinn, Presi- 
dent; W. H. Lumsden, Vice-President; L. W. Burris; 
Treasurer, and H. A. Carlton, Secretary. 

Club Racing at Albany, Oregon. 

Albany, July 29, 1905. 

Tho Independence Driving Club gave a successful 
program this afternoon at their half mile track just 
beyond the city limits. Attendance was satisfactory, 
weather pleasant and track good. The participants 
were mostly local owners and the interest manifested 
was on that account all the more keen. No records 
were smashed, but tho entertainment offered satisfied 
the crowd. The harness races were half mile heats, 
three in five, with the exception of the "club race" 
which was two in three. Small purses, plus a propor- 
tion of tho gate receipts, were offered. The program 
bad provided an event for the gallopers, whicb, how- 
ever, was not pulled off. The summaries. 

2:30 class, trot or pace. 

Del Wilkes, br h by Del Norte (KlrUlaud) 1 1 1 

Zamona, b m hy Zombro , (Beinap) 2 2 2 

Coma, t h by Caution (Scott) 3 3 3 

Time— 1:40, 1:20, l:i»tf. 

Club race, members named horses, three-year-olds. 

Ted R , ch g by Lovelace (Ray) 1 1 

Golden Boy, cb g by Coeur d'Alone (Wilklns) 2 2 

Hanna, br m by Mark Hanna (Klrkland) 3 3 

Cloldcn Flyer, b h by Scarlet Letter (Taylor) 4 4 

Tlme-1:36^, 1:35'/,.- 

Road horse race. 

The Kreak br g (unknown) (Scott) 1 1 1 

Btnger Herman b g (Lovelace and Klrkland) 3 2 2 

Neptune b h by Col. Gift (Beinap) 2 3 3 

Time-1:25, 1:I9'i. 1:24. 
Boys running race, for saddle ponies, Jay- won, Hot Tamale 
second, Snowtlake third; time 59 seconds. 

The well known trainer, J. Stetson, with J. M. Kirk- 
land of Independence and G. A. Westgate of Albany 
acted as judges, D. O. Wood worth and A. Staats hold- 
ing the watches. 



A three-year-old standard bred trotting colt is 
offered for sale by an advertiser this week that is 
worthy of especial mention, not alone on bis individu- 
ality, which 19 superb, but on his pedigree which is 
unique inasmuch as he traces four times to that great 
thoroughbred mare Fanny G., by imported Margrave, 
twice through his sire Iran Alto 2 : 1 2 J and twice 
through his dam the registered mare Alma Wilks- 
wood by Alcantara. The second dam of this colt is 
tho great broodmare Emma Nutwood dam of Lottery 
Ticket 2:19J and Pilot Prince 2:23] both 2:10 sires, the 
former being the sire of Mush 2:08( and the latter sire 
of Nance O'Neil 2:09}. The colts third dam is that 
famous old mare Lady Emma, record 2:38 on a half 
mile track, sired by Black Hawk 707, bis fourth dam 
Is by tho world 's champion trotter at 30 miles, Gen. 
Taylor, and tho fifth dam the mare Rosalie by Wil- 
liamson's Belmont. If there is a better bred son of 
Iran Alto 2:12} than this one we have not heard of 
bim. Hannibal, as tho colt is called should make a 
great stock horse as ho has the size and conformation 
and will sire speed to a certainty. 



4 



Oftie gveeoev crni* sportsman 



[August 5, 1905 




Breeders meeting 

Will open at Santa Rosa 



One week from next Wednesday. 



It will bo the greatest meeting held in California 
this year. 

A car load of new McMurray white enameled sulkies 
just received by the Kenney Manufacturing Company, 
531 Valencia street. 

A sale of high-class, standard-bred stallions, brood 
mares, geldings and fillies will be held at Colusa next 
Wednesday, August 9th. 



Petigru 2:10J is goinar so well and showing such ex- 
treme speed that he may be taken East for the late 
fall meetings on the Grand Circuit. 



Bids will be opened Monday next for the privileges 
of the Breeders meeting at Santa Rosa. The privileges 
to be let will be found advertised in our columns to- 
day. 

Mart Rollin's good gelding Charley Belden by Lyn- 
wood W, dam by Silas Skinner, trotted a mile in 2:16 
last Saturday at Santa Rosa and the last quarter was 
in 32 seconds. 

The new 29-pound Flower City sulky which the San 
Francisco Wheel & Novelty Company has just received 
is a beauty. Get it to win a race with at Santa Rosa 
or the State Fair. 

J. O. Gerrity has the string of trotters and pacers 
owned by W. A. Clark, Jr. and will drive them in 
their races at the New England meetings and later on 
the Grand Circuit. 

The row of stalls filled with young Sidney Dillons 
which Frank Turner has at the Santa Rosa track at- 
tract the attention of all visitors to that speed centre. 
They are grand looking colts and fillies. 



Zolock 2:05} has been bred to about twenty mares 
since he started at Los Angeles. He is not only the 
fastest entire son of McKinney, but is considered by 
many students of pedigree and blood lines to be the 
best bred. 

C. K. G. Billings drove his pacing team Hontas 
Crook and Prince Direct a quarter of a mile against 
time at Cleveland track last week and they covered 
the distance in 29^ seconds. This is the fastest quarter 
ever paced by a team. 



The dam of Belle Mack 2:04} has foaled a very hand- 
some colt by Rey Direct 2:10 It is a natural pacer. 
This mare will be bred to Pilot Wilkes this season. 
Mr. Chas Master, who owns her. recently lost a full 
brother to Belle Mack. 



For a purse of $400 offered for the free-for-all pacers 
at Titusville, Pa , last week, there were five starters. 
The track is a half mile oval, vet the time of Frank 
Yoakum, the winner, was 2:05}, 2:06} and 2:12. The 
last heat was in the rain. 



Colts and fillies entered in the Occident, Stanford 
and Breeders futurity stakes are to be sold at Colusa 
on the 9th of August, when Mr. E. C. Peart of that 
city disposes of his standard bred stallions, mares, 
geldings and fiillies. Here is a chance to buy a future 
stake winner at your own price. 



The Directors of the State Agricultural Society 
have decided to have all livestock to be entered or 
raced at the coming State Fair to be examined by 
Drs. Charles Keane, J. H. McLean, A. M. McCollum, 
C. L. Megowan and D. F. Fox before permitting them 
upon the Fair grounds. 



Alta McDonald gave Excuse No. 69 from Murray 
Howe's Excuse Book to account for Sweet Marie's 
defeat at Philadelphia. This excuse reads "Track 
did not suit her." McDonald, however, overlooked 
Murray Howe's foot note which reads "Never use this 
one when all the heats are better than 2:12." 



Fred H. Chase & Co. announce than or about Octo- 
ber 12, 1805, they will sell at auction at Suisun, fifty 
head of registered Shorthorn bulls and heifers from 
the prize winning Humboldt Herd, property of Rush 
& Pierce. Write to their office, 1732 Market street, 
San Francisco, for particulars and catalogues. 



The three-year-old trotters that start in the Breed- 
ers Futurity this year will contest for $2300, divided 
50, 25, 15 and 10 per cent. First money will be $1150, 
and if the owner of the winner was the original nomi- 
nator of the colt he will be paid $200 additional. The 
owner of the stallion at the time the colt was bred will 
get $100 , 

"Smoke Stack" won again with Golden Gate when 
he reached Fremont, Nebraska. The account of the 
race states that it was a 2:40 trot that he started in. 
Although the Bay Bird gelding has been pacing in 
his previous starts this year, he can go either gait 
and as the best time of the Fremont race was 2:25, the 
probability is that Brown is starting him in all races 
to which he is eligible and has a chance to win. 
Golden Gate's pacing record is 2:13} made at Denver 
in June, this year. 



"Young man, see what hard work will do. The 
boy that cared for the roan filly I raced at Gumbo 
Flats, July 4, has opened a publie training stable at 
Pumpkinville Corners, and already has an even dozen 
horses in his string. Six weeks ago he didn't know 
what a ' quarter boot" looked like, but now he is the 
"real thing." — Columbus. 

Electro, bay stallion by Sutter 29069, dam the thor- 
oughbred mare Buchu by Buchanan, is a two-year-old 
of high form md great promise. He is owned by Mr. 
E. C. Peart of Colusa, is entered in the Stanford and 
Occident stakes of next yea'*, and will be sold at auc- 
tion at Colusa next Wednesday with the rest of Mr. 
Pearl's stock. 

Zolock will not be entered in the free-for-all pace at 
the State Fair. All the horsemen conceded it would 
be a walk over for the great son of McKinney and 
Henry Delaney shows that he is willing to let others 
have a chance by keeping Zolock out of the race. 
Zolock will be driven exhibition miles, however, so 
the public will have a chance to see him. 



Ed Parker who marked Dictatress 2:08J, Rey Direct 
2:10 and many other fast ones, has opened a public 
training stable at Pleasanton and desires a few more 
horses to train. Mr. Parker is one of the most care- 
ful men in the business, knows how togetspeed out of 
colts and teaches them good manners as well as know- 
ing how to gait and balance them. His advertisement 
appears in our business columns. 



Bought a few years ago for $5andlatersold for $150, 
a "scrub" pony broke a world's record in Denver, 
July 29th, and now his owner would not take $1500 
for him. The world's half-mile mark for polo ponies 
was broken at the City Park track by Uncle Sam, 
owned by George C. Wood and ridden by Charles G. 
Sutton, who weighs 165 pounds. Uncle Sam's time 
was :52 2-5. The world's record was :52:{. 



The celebration to be made by the Native Sons at 
Sacramento during fair week will undoubtedly draw 
a very large crowd to the Capital City. The exhibit 
at the pavilion this year will be under the auspices of 
this order and will consist of displays of the products 
of the various counties in the State. The Agricultural 
Society offers $500 for first prize. Admission to the 
pavilion will be free during the entire week. 



Remember the sale of high-class standard bred 
stallions, broodmares, geldings and fillies that is to 
take place Wednesday, August 9th, at Colusa, Cali- 
fornia. These animals are consigned by Mr. E. C. 
Peart, the well known merchant and stock breeder of 
Colusa oounty, and some very choice young prospects 
are among them. A lot of sulkies, carts and harness 
are also to be sold at the same time and place. 



Sales of horses in New York and Chicago thus far 
this year exceed those of the corresponding period 
last season by about 10,000 head in each city. The 
increase is remarkable in view of the immense pres- 
sure of vast capital to crowd horses out. Motor vehi- 
cles are being promoted aa enormous cost to the mak- 
ers and users, yet opposition to horses only seems to 
emphasize their utility in all industry and commerce. 



The New York Club is expending about $250,000 in 
remodeling, or rather, rebuilding, its clubhouse in 
East Fifty-eighth street. The new riding ring when 
completed will be a trifle larger than any other in this 
country, with an area of 18.000 square feet. It is to 
be 173} feet long and 104 feet wide. To make room 
for i high basement stable containing 400 stalls the 
level of the ring will be raised ten feet above the 
street. 



The directors of the Kings County Agricultural 
Association held a meeting August 1st, and made 
many arrangements in regard to the Central Califor- 
nia Fair to be held at Hanford in October. There is 
much enthusiasm in Kings county over the fair this 
year, and an effort will be made to make it the best 
fair yet held there. A number of handsome silver 
cups have already been donated for the live stock 
department. 

The Kings county supervisors have made a va'uable 
discovery in making new roads. After the roadway 
is thoroughly oiled they cover the oil with straw. 
This they claim prevents the oii from adhering to the 
wheels and horses' hoofs, but at the same time allows 
the vehicles and animals to thoroughly work the oil 
into the ground, thus making a smooth roadway with- 
out the usual waste of oil by its being carried off on 
wheels and horses' hoofs. 



Lou Milton, the dam of Lou Dillon 1:58£, etc., has a 
new representative in the list in her great grand- 
daughter Sally Pointer 2:13}, owned by Mr. J. C. 
Adams of Phoenix, Arizona. Sally Pointer is by Sky 
Pointer, own brother to Star Pointer, and her dam is 
Sister, matinee record 2:20 by McKinney, second dam 
Aiieen 2:26i by Anteeo, third dam Lou Milton by 
Milton Medium. Sally Pointer stands 16.2, weighs 
1320 pounds and is one of the largest mares on the 
turf. 



John Phippen has a mare with a colt at her side 
that is a futurity candidate, bred well enough for and 
looking to have class enough to win first money. 
The mare is Athene by Dexter Prince, dam Athena 
by Electioneer, second dam Ashby by Gen. Benton, 
third dam the thoroughbred mare Ashland by Ash- 
land. The colt was foaled in April this year and is by 
that great racehorse, Kinney Lou 2:07|, son of Mc- 
Kinney 2:11}. If there isn't race winning blood in 
this colt, there was never one foaled with it in his 
veins. McKinney, Dexter Prince, Electioneer and 
thoroughbred is the combination. 



Eighteen horses won heats in 2:10 or better at the 
Detroit meeting, and still the racing \vas not con- 
sidered sensational. The number of 2:10 performers 
is increasing so fast tnat unless a trotter or pacer 
shows he is likely to go two or three heats in that 
time he is not considered of class enough to race on 
the Grand Circuit. 



The Sonoma County Driving Club has joined the 
National Trotting Association and will hold all its 
races according to rule. The first meeting of the new 
organization will be on Wednesday of next week when 
a benefit will be tendered to Willard Zibbell, the un- 
fortunate young trainer, so terribly injured in the 
recent Fresno railroad accident. 



The Occidental Hotel at Santa Rosa has been en- 
larged by a very handsome pressed brick addition 
containing 100 rooms ensuite and single. There is 
not an inside room in the building, and all are hand- 
somely furnished, with bath, hot aDd cold water, 
electric lights, etc. Messrs. Bain and Quinn, the pro- 
prietors, have made The Occidental the finest hotel 
north of San Francisco. A new electric elevator of 
the most approved pattern has also been installed. 
The Occidental will be headquarters for horsemen 
during the meeting of the Breeders Association which 
opens August 16th. 



Who will win the Califorria Stake, $2000, at the 
Breeders Meeting at Santa Rosa? There were 17 
original entries, but probably not more than seven or 
eight will face the starter. On form thus far displayed 
the race looks to be between Charley T. by Zombro, 
Oro Belmont and Little Babe. There ara several 
prospective starters, however, that have not made 
their appearance at the meetings up to this time, that 
may be "the goods." No one can tell just how fast 
the race will be trotted, but Morosco's mark of 2:12 
last year will probably not be equalled. Field tickets 
should be in demand when the race is called. 



Mr. Chas. Griffiths' great mare, Bon Bon 2:26, was 
about eighteen years old when she died at Pleasanton 
in 1903, but as Macbeth said of Lady Macbeth, "she 
should have died hereafter." Word comes from the 
East that Bon Bon's colt, Rector by Rect 2:16 J, took 
a pacing record of 2:10} at Saugus two weeks ago, 
giving her three standard performers, the other 
two being Bonnie Direct 2:05} and Bonsilene 2:14}. 
Rector's sire, Rect, is by Direct 2:05J, out of Lilly 
Stanley 2: 1 7 A . Bonnie Steinway, son of Steinway and 
Bon Bon will be another 2:10 performer to be added to 
the list soon, as he worked a mile in 2:08 at Pleasanton 
a few weeks ago. Bon Bon's family is destined to be 
one of the great ones within a few years. 



Mr. E. E. Smathers, who deserted the trotters a 
couple of seasons ago and put a great stable of run- 
ning horses together, has male arrangements with 
the Fasig-Tipton company to dispose at public auc- 
tion of his entire racing string. Mr. Smathers has 
been unfortunate in his running venture, it being said 
that he has lost during the past two seasons $450,000, 
outside of the expense of the s'able. Mr. Smathers 
does not say that he will again put together a stable 
of trotters, but says he will quit the runners for a 
time, anyway. When he went over to the runners he 
disposed of one of the greatest stables of light harness 
horse ever put together by an amateur driver. 
Among them was Major Delmar, the champion trot- 
ting gelding and winner of the famous Memphis Go!d 
Cup. 

A correspondent who was at the Alameda track 
last Sunday sends us the following account of a 
race held there that day. The race was a match for 
$100 a side, made by the well-known and popular road 
drivers, W. Grondola an<1 Louie Tesio, the former 
starting Lady May, and the latter Gypsy. The race 
was won by Lady May in straight heats after one of 
the best contested races ever seen in Alameda county. 
Great interest was taken in the race as the principals 
are both popular members of the Oakland Driving 
Club. A large crowd, estimated at 2000 people, saw 
the sport, many ladies being present. Much money 
changed hands, favoriteism being evenly divided. 
The judges were the well-known and efficient horse- 
men, A. G. Andrews, Harold D. McGill and George 
Rafetta. L. Jackson, the old-time driver, acted as 
starter. The race was conducted in a most satis- 
factory manner, the heats being fairly and honestly 
trotted and the officials receiving high praise on their 
prompt and fair decisions. 



Jos. Cuicello, the well-known trainer, was the victim 
of a peculiar accident last Tuesday evening while on 
the ferry steamer Tiburon as she was making her 
landing at Tiburon. The steamer was just rounding 
into the slip when her forward steering-rod broke. 
She was headed straight for the dolphin on the other 
side of the slip at the moment, and when the accident 
occurred continued her course and jammed her nose 
into the dolphin. The force of the impact snapped 
the flagpole on her forward end, and a piece fifteen 
feet long fell to to the deck below. 'Cuicello and an- 
other passenger for Santa Rosa were struck down by 
the piece, and as a result will bear ugly scalp wounds 
for some time to come. Both men received immediate 
treatment at the hands of Army Surgeon Cummings, 
who is stationed at Angel Island, and who was on the 
boat at the time. While their injuries were being 
attended, both men missed the last train for their 
homes in Santa Rosa. President Foster stayed with 
them and offered to send them to Santa Rosa on a 
special train, but this offer was declined, the men 
saying that they were all right and could spend the 
evening in Tiburon as well as not. Cuicello might 
have escaped without injury, but he saw that a lady 
in front of him was directly in line of the descending 
flagpole, and jumped forward in an effort to keep it 
from hitting her. 



August 5, 1905] 



b 



May Earl, a handsome four-y ear-old mare is the 
most talked about animal at the Lexington track. 
The Stock Farm says she is a four-year-old bay mare 
by San Mateo 2:13} (son of Simmons 2:28), dam Annie 
Earl by Earlmont. In her three-year-old form in 
1904 she trotted a trial mile in 2:10*, caught by a dozen 
watches, and a few days ago stepped the full length 
of the Lexington fair grounds track in 2:09J, driven 
by Mike Bowerman. In working this mile May Earl 
trotted the last half in 1:04J, and the last quarter in 
3H seconds. Twenty minutes later she was driven a 
mile in about 2:12, it being her fourth mile that day. 
No other four year-old trotter has ever equalled this 
work over the Lexington track in July. May Earl 
possesses a pure gait and trots on her own courage. 
She is owned by John B. Stewart, who ako owns her 
two-year-old full sister, a good gaited filly that has 
already beaten 2:30 in her work. 



Guy Fortune has been retired from the racing 
ranks and from now out he will shine in the show 
ring instead of an the trotting track, says an ex- 
change. This handsome uhestnut stallion has a trot- 
ting record of 2:11 J, and Scott Hudson was of the 
opinion that he was destined for a record of 2:06. 
When Hudson broke up his racing stable Guy Fortune 
was sent to Ed Geers but the latter did not have a 
chance to get acquainted with the trotter before he 
was purchased by Lawrence Jones of Louisville. The 
latter thinks that Guy Fortune will make the fastest 
high stepper in the world. He has lots of action 
forward and back and he will need but a few lessons 
in order to shine in his new role. Guy Fortune is 
but another illustration of the fact that the Ameri- 
can trotter is the greatest all-round trotter in the 
world. Many of the best blue ribbon winners in the 
high stepping show ring classes have been trotters 
with records. Unfortunately for the breeders these 
horses have too often lost their identity when con- 
verted into high steppers, and not infrequently the 
hackney has been accorded the credit which right- 
fully belonged to the trotter. Horse show enthusiasts 
when proclaiming that the trotter is merely a slab- 
sided speed marvel should be reminded of the facts in 
the case. Speed and beauty go hand and hand with 
the up-to-date breeder. 



The very fast pacing mare, Little Squaw 2:04$, has 
joined the double-gaited record brigade. She started 
as a trotter recently at Nevada, Missouri, and won 
the race easily, getting a mark of 2:22}. 



Dan Patoh 1:56 has made his start as a sire. Sailor 
2:17}, a winner in the Gas Belt Circuit, is by the 
champion. 

On the opening day of the Windsor meeting, George 
Ketch um of Toledo, owner of Cresceus, purchased for 
George McMillan, Calgary, Northwest Territory, the 
sensational pacer Gallagher 2:03$, at a price reported 
to be in the neighborhood of $10,000 Gallagher will 
be shipped to England, where he will be raced in the 
stable of Walter Winans. 



The Canadian Ice Racing Circuit for next winter 
has been organized and an effort will be made to con- 
duct the racing on the same lines as the regular sum- 
mer meetings are conducted. The circuit members 
and dates are: Toronto, December 27th to 28th; Orillia, 
January 3d to 4th; Port Parry, January 9th to 10th; 
Lindsay, January 13th tol4th; Peterborough, January 
19th to 20th; Port Hope, January 26th to 27th; Picton, 
January 31st to February 1st; Belleville, February 3d 
to 4th; Kingston, February 8th to 9th. Ottawa and 
Montreal will follow with meetings of longer duration. 



Ellamore, three-year-old record 2:29$ by Baronmore, 
is one of the most attractive mares driven on the New 
York speedway, and at a matinee there last week 
trotted a heat in 2:22$. Her second dam is Echora 
2:23$, the dam of Direct 2:05$. 



"Marque" says a very curious feature of the three- 
heat plan in vogue at Detroit is the fact that a horse 
can win two heats of a race, thus getting two-thirds 
of first money and by being shut out in the third heat 
lose the race and with it the pool money. If a driver 
has an incentive to cheat this plan puts a marked pack 
of cards in his hands and encourages him to use it. 
It's a case of getting the money coming and going. 
For instance: A is sold favorite for the race and, 
after winning the first heat, is a more pronounced 
favorite than ever. His managers buy all the fields 
against him but play him in the books to win the 
second heat. He wins the second heat and then his 
managers find it possible to buy the field against him 
for a song. He makes a break and gets shut out in the 
third heat, thus making it impossible, under the con- 
ditions of the race, to win the money bet on the result 
of the race. The consequence is that he has won two- 
thirds of first money; won all the money bet on him 
to win the first and second heats and yet has lost the 
race. 

Chas. C. Woodmansee, aged 30 years, son of the 
well-known Minneapolis horseman, Daniel W. Wood- 
mansee, fell from a wharf at San Diego last Sunday 
while fishing, and wasdrowned. 



Mr. A. B. Spreckels is in New York, where on the 
30th inst. his annual consignment of thoroughbred 
yearlings from his Napa Stock Farm will be sold at 
public auction by the Fasig'fipton Company. There 
are eighteen head in this consignment by im- 
ported Solita're II and Marlus II, and several others 
by imported Crlghton, imported The Judge, imported 
St. Symphorien and the well known horse Libertine. 
While last year's consignment from this farm was an 
especially fine lot of yearlings, the youngsters that 
Superintendent Geo. W. Berry will take over this 
year are said by those who have seen them to be the 
best and highest class lot of yearlings ever bred on a 
California Stock Farm. 



Angle, the winner of the Merchants' and Manu- 
facturers' Stake at Detroit, was bred in Lexington by 
Dr. O. J. Phelps. Her wonderful performance again 
repudiates the often advanced theory that the first 
foal will be worthless Angle is the first foal of Lena 
Rivers, by Gambonita, a son of Gambetta Wilkes. 
Lena Rivers did not race, but was one of the most 
beautiful show and buggy mares ever seen around 
Lexington. She also had a world of speed, for her 
owner, Dr. Phelps, has often been heard to say that 
Lena Rivers could step a mile to a buggy along the 
turnpike from 2:27 to 2:30. Angle is by Axtell, one of 
the highest priced trotting stallions ever sold. She 
was developed at the Kentucky Trotting Horse Breed- 
ers Association track in the hands of Mike and George 
Bowerman and later in the hands of W. F. Freeman, 
She was bought from Bowerman Bros, by Mr. Free- 
man the summer she was a three-year-old for a short 
price. Later in the year she worked a mile in 2:15. 
the half in 1 :03} and the quarter in 30} seconds. As a 
four-year-old she worked a mile in 2:10 and behind 
the wind shield a mile in 2:06$. The fall Angle was a 
four-year-old Mr. Freeman sold her to Calvin Morris, 
of Cleveland, for 815,000. — Kentucky Farmer. 



There is sometimes a great difference between 
thsory and fact. According to the trotting instinct 
theorists the world 's record-breaking trotters of to- 
day should be those which inherit the most trotting 
instinct and the least running blood, through the 
near ancestors of both sire and dam. There are 
thousands of trotting stallions whose dams were much 
more strongly bred in trotting lines than was the dam 
of Sidney Dillon, yet he sired the world 's champion 
trotter, Lou Dillon 1:58$. There were thousands 
whose dams had much more trotting inheritance than 
did the dam of Directum 2:05}, yet he holds the 
world's champion record for four-year-old trotters 
Speed ability is just as essential to record-breaking 
trotters as Is trotting instinct. — 'American Horse 
Breeder. 

With the fad for automobiles at high-water mark it 
is rather surprising that the carriage builders of New 
York should be experiencing one of the best summer 
seasons they have known in five years. Suoh is the 
report from nearly every house in the trade, however. 
As showing the improvement in business since last 
year one of the oldest builders of high-grade work in 
New York says their deliveries to July 15 were only 
12 short of the entire number of carriages sold by 
them in 1904. Not only is the demand for carriages 
healthy, but the sales of horses in New York and 
Chicago thus far this year exceed those of the corre- 
sponding period last season by about 10,000 head in 
each city. The increase is remarkable in view of the 
immense pressure of vast capital to crowd horses out. 
Motor vehicles are being promoted at enormous cost 
to the makers and users, yet opposition to horses 
only seems to emphasize their utility in all industry 
and commerce. — New York. Herald. 



One of the three-year-old trotters being talked 
about at Cleveland is Carrie McKerron, a daughter of 
John A. McKerron 2:04$ and Carrie Onward 2:14$. 

The show horse and the speed horse are not so far 
apart as some imagine, especially if they are bred in 
trotting lines. Some time ago John Stewart, the 
dealer of Lexington, Ky , bought for show purposes a 
very handsome bay horse by Bow Bells 2:19}, dam 
Belle Cassett 2:13}, and a few days ago it was dis- 
covered that in addition to being a show horse and a 
high actor he is also gifted with speed. The first time 
he was asked to trot a mile he turned the trick in 2:50; 
the second time in 2:40, and the third time he stepped 
the distance in 2:28$, the last quarter in 35 seconds. 



The Japanese government, through B. Hirosawa 
and T. Hayashi of Tokio, and H Murai of London, 
have closed a deal in this country for stock valued at 
$110,000, and the horses will go forward on their long 
journey to the island Empire about August 1st, start- 
ing from the Ideal Stock Farm at Kast Aurora, writes 
Frank B. Smith in Horse World. The purchase in- 
cludes 17 thoroughbred racers, 11 trotting-bred stal- 
lions, 2 hackney fihies and 4 hackney stallions. The 
34 animals thus averaged about $3235 apiece, and 
the sale is regarded as one of the most important 
transactions in the history of the breeding industry. 
Superintendent John Bradburn of the Ideal Stock 
Farm conducted the negotiations for the sellers, while 
the Japanese had the invaluable experience of John 
Mackay, manager of the famous El Paso Stable ot J. 
B. Haggin, in their selections, beside a veterinary 
surgeon. The animals will go from Buffalo to the 
Pacific Coast in three special cars on an express train 
schedule. Three careful trainers will be in charge 
and when the long voyage over the Pacific is begun, 
they will accompany the horses until they are de- 
livered in Japan, when they will return home. Their 
expenses both ways and the usual rate of wages, will 
be paid by the Mikado's government, in order that 
the horses may arrive in their new homes in the best 
possible condition. The deal was facilitated by the 
fact that the Ideal Farm was formerly known as the 
Village Farm, and some four years ago the Hamlins 
sold the Japanese a carload of horses which proved 
so satisfactory that they sought another and a larger 
'consignment from the same breeders. It is believed 
that when the price paid for the animals is added to 
the amounts expended in bringing them to Japan, 
and the disbursements for wages and expenses are 
also included, that the total cost of each animal will 
far exceed that of any other similar purchase ever 
made for a foreign government. Mr. Hirosawa, who 
has been in Buffalo for several weeks, is authority for 
the statement that the animals will be used solely to 
Improve the breed of the native horses, and that there 
will be other purchases made In the United States, 
but no more in the vicinity of Buffalo. The three 
representatives of Japan will now journey to Europe, 
and attend the contention of veterinary surgeons held 
fat Buda Pesth In August. 



A Great Mile for Derbertha. 

Pleasanton, July 23, 1905. 
One of the greatest miles ever seen at the Pleasan- 
ton race track was driven by Farmer Bunch behind 
Derbertha. full sister to Don Derby 2:04}, Diablo 2:09}, 
Oy who 2:09$, etc. The Farmer had noised it around 
that he could drive her a mile in 2:10 or better. 
There were a few that doubted it so the Farmer said 
he would show them, so quite a crowd assembled at 
the Judge's stand to watch the performance. I will 
give you the miles just as she paced them. The mare 
was brought on the track and warmed up a mile In 
2:30, the second mile was in 2:24, last half in 1:08, the 
third mile was in 2:19, the last half in 1:04, last quarter 
in 30 seconds. The Farmer then told the boys he 
would be ready in twenty minutes to make the trial. 
A runner was brought out this time and after scoring 
three or four times they were given the word. Der- 
bertha paced the first quarter in 33 seconds, the half 
in 1:05} and the three-quarters in 1:38$. In coming 
in to the stretch she made a disastrous break and 
finished the mile in 2:12}. Every body thought 
Bunch wouldn't try again but the Farmer said he 
would be back in twenty minutes so all waited. 
Hardly any thought she would go in 2:10 let alone 
beating it. She scored two or three times and was 
given the word. She went the first quarter in 32 sec- 
onds, to the half in 1:04, three quarters in 1:36$ and 
the mile in 2:07$. 

The mile was timed by Mr. Griffith, Dr. Boucher, 
George A. Kelley, Mr. Ronan, Billy De Ryder and 
s 3 veral others, so there is no mistake but what the 
time is correct. Some had it a little faster. Thi 8 
equals the track record held by Anaconda and Search- 
light. Searchlight was driven by the late Thomas 
Keating and Anaconda was driven by the late Johnny 
Blue, and both horses had records better than 2:05 
when they did it, and it was done in the winter time, 
when the track is supposed to be faster than it is now. 
Last year on the 27th of July at our race meeting, 
Billy Red paced the fastest mile of the meeting 2:12$, 
and Tom Carneal took a record of 2:13. They wt-nt 
to Santa Rosa and Billy Red forced Tom Carneal to 
pace in 2:08$ his present record and Billy Red took u 
record of 2:10. So you see that the Pleasanton track 
is not the fastest track in the summer time. Every- 
body agreed that if Derbertha was taken to Santa 
Rosa and started that she would go a mile in 2:05 or 
better. Derbertha wears no rigging of any kind, goes 
with a low head, wears a 10-ounce shoe in front and 
6$-ounces behind, a pair of heel boots in front anil 
coronet boots behind . She is six years old and about 
15.2 hands high, will weigh about 1075, in color is a 
dark chestnut. A lady can drive her any place. She 
is the property of Robert Niles, of Eureka, Humboldt 
county. She is the first purchase he ever made in 
the race horse line and he is to be congratulated on 
owning such a great mare. Mr. Niles also owns the 
dam of Lady Waldstein and she is the dam of that 
sensational pacing colt at Los Angeles which paced a 
miie in 2:07$ last year. He is by a son of Direct. I 
heard Mr. Salisbury say if they would drive him a 
mile that fast and let him time him, he would givo 
$10,000 for him. Mr. Niles owns a full sister and full 
brother to Lady Waldstein, and a filly by Lecco 
2:09$ out of the old mare, so it looks like he was 
starting in the business In the right way. Mr. Niles 
expects to race . Derbertha down the Grand Circuit 
next year and I hope she will be another Sweet Marie, 
and she surely looks it now. She will be given slow 
work for a while and then let up on until next winter 
when she will be prepared for the big events over 
East. Rail Bird. 

What They Think of the Breeders Ass'n. 

The following is from an editoral In the Fresno 
Democrat: Fresno enjoyed last week four days of 
extraordinary and honest horse racing. That race 
meet of the Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders' 
Association with its results attracted the notice of 
horsemen all over the country and therefore it proved 
one of the best advertisements that Fresno could 
possibly have had. But aside from this consideration, 
there was another feature which has not been given 
the public notice it deserves. That is that some of 
the best California bred race horses were assembled 
for the Fresno meet, that extraordinary good racing 
was the result with fast time and broken track recoids; 
that every horse entered in a race was run for all tho 
speed that was in him and that the sport was con- 
ducted by gentlemen in a gentlemanly fashion for the 
entertainment of gentlemen and ladles and unattended 
by the gambling accompaniments, which unfortu- 
nately ha ve done so much to bring the turf into dis- 
repute. The Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders' 
Association is one factor to elevate honest horse rac- 
ing as a sport fit for kings and to Fresno, which last 
week it visited for the second time in Its oareer, it 
will ever be weloomo. 



[August 5, 1905 




Sweet Marie Beats Tiverton. 

"Money makes the mare go," according to the old 
proverb, and perhaps Sweet Marie will not do her 
level best unless the money i9 at the wire. At Phil- 
adelphia two weeks ago when she and Tiverton met, 
they raced for a share of the gate receipts. There 
was not a very large crowd present and Sweet Marie 
refused to trot her best, making disastrous breaks in 
every heat. Like a petted prima donna that refuses 
to warble her best notes to a small house, Sweet Marie 
perhaps took a look at the grand stand and concluded 
that she would not show her fastest gait for such a 
small return, and let Tiverton walk away with the 
race while she indulged in a few "jimmies" and 
objected to being driven so hard for such a small sum. 

There was $5000 up at Readville Thursday, how- 
ever, and McKinney's daughter shook her locks, cast 
her eye at the big bag of gold and Say9 "Here's where 
I will show you whether Tiverton can beat me a two- 
in-three or any other old race." So she went at him 
the first heat and made his driver hustle to beat hei 
half a length. In the second heat she began to trot 
her best a little sooner and when the stretch -vas 
reached she had Tiverton extended to his utmos., and 
beat him a neck. He was tired then, and when she 
collared him on the third heat, Tiverton was game as 
a pebble but at the distance post was "all in" and 
she jogged to the wire a length in front, of him. We 
will let the Associated Press tell the story of the race. 

Readville, Mass., Aug. 3— California and New 
York met today at Readville track, and when the 
contest of the speed ended the honors were awarded 
to the Pacific slope. In one of the finest speed con- 
tests ever seen on any race course, Sweet Marie 
defeated Tiverton two out of three heats, thereby 
winning for her owner, William Garland, of Los 
Angeles, a purse of $5000. 

It was 2:30 when Alta McDonald, behind Sweet 
Marie, and John.Howell with Tiverton, appeared for 
the first heat, the latter getting the pole on the toss. 
After two preliminary scores all waB in readiness, and 
the first time down they got the word, with Tlvertoa 
a saddle girth In the lead. This advantage he in- 
creased until he swung down the stretch for home, 
when Sweet Marie reached his wheel, but the gelding 
won handily by half a length. Sweet Marie was 
under a hard drive. The time 2:05} was the trotting 
record of the year, beating that of Dr. Strong at 
Petroit last week by half a second. 



In the second heat. McDonald had Sweet Marie 
right on her stride and went away with Tiverton at a 
whirlwind gait. For a few strides the mare showed in 
front and then the gelding forged ahead, leading at 
the quarter by a length. This time McDonald made 
his dr,ve earlier, reaching Tiverton at the three- 
quarters. From there to the wire was witnessed one 
of the most desperate finishes ever seen on a track. 
The 6000 spectators in the grandstand were aroused to 
the highest pitch of excitement^ and when Sweet 
Marie flashed under the wire a winner by a neck the 
applause was deafening and continued until the driver 
had dismounted and weighed in. Time — 2:043. 

In the third and final heat Tiverton rushed to the 
front, but Sweet Marie yoked him on the lower turn 
Howell pushed Tiverton to the distance post. Then 
he realized that he was beaten and considerably eased 
his horse, the mare jogging home a winner by an open 
length. Time— 2:06}. 

The time of the three heats was, with the exception 
of the Cresceus-The Abbot race at Brighton Beach, 
the fastest ever trotted. 1 n the opinion of experienced 
horsemen the time made today was superior, as The 
Abbot was withdrawn after the second heat and Cres- 
ceus went the mile accompanied by a runner for a 
pacemaker. Summary: 

Match race, trotting, purse $5000. 

Sweet Marie, b m by McKinney (McDonald) 2 1 I 

Tiverton, b g by Galileo Rex (Howell) 1 2 8 

Time by quarters- 
First heat :32 1:03H 1:31« 2:05(4 

Second heat.. .:3I« 1:0;!* 1:33X 2:04%. 
Third heat....:S2 1:03*4 1:34)4 8:16* 

How the Rivals Are Rigged. 

Rigged for her races Sweet Marie will pull a 29- 
pound Flower City sulky painted while with gold 
stripes — the Garland colors. She will wear knee, shin 
and quarter boots front, shin and coronet scalpers 
behind, with eight-ounce shoes front and 4} plates 
behind, with a two-ounce toe weight. All her traps 
are whlte-and-gold striped. 

Tiverton wears nearly all the traps used for a 
trotter. On his front legs he Is rigged with knee, 
front shin, arm and quarter boots, behind with shin, 
coronet, scalpers and hock boots. He wears nine- 
ounce shoes front, with a three-ounce toe weight and 
six-ounce shoe behind. He will pull a 32-pound 
Decker sulky. He Is also rigged with a Tiverton rod 
and tongue strap. 

Frank Upton, who went down the line with Major 



Delmar 1:59}, has charge of Sweet Marie, assisted by 
Ed Brown, alias Tug Wilson. George Wenlock is 
looking after Tiverton. He formerly had charge of 
Louise Mc. 2:09J, Senator Mills 2:12} and Eddie Lock- 
wood's string. — Horse Review . 



Winners of the Two Big Stakes. 

George Saunders is the fifteenth driver to win the 
M. & M. The following is acomplete list of the drivers 
who have won this classic in the order named: 

H. A. Hills, with Hendryx 2:18ij; Bob Stewart, with 
Walter E. 2:18}; George Spear, with Temple Bar 
2:17}; John Pickett, with NightiDgale 2:17}; John 
Goldsmith, with Siva 2:13i{; Robert J. Brawley. with 
J. M. D. 2:15}; J. C. Chandler and Ed. F. Geers, with 
The Corporal 2:13}; Joe Rea, with Emma Offut 2:12}; 
W. O. Foote, with Rilma 2:11}; John Kelly, with Di- 
rectum Kelly 2:11}; George Spear, with Royal Baron 
2:10*; Ed. F. Geers, with Lady Geraldine 2:14j; Tom 
Marsh, with Eleata2:08J; Scott Hudson, with Rhyth- 
mic 2:1]}; Dick Wilson, with John Taylor 2:10}; Ed. 
F. Geers, with Stanley Dillon 2:11}; George Saunders, 
with Angle, best time, 2:10}; best time for winner, 2:11. 

It will be seen by the above record, running from 
1889 to include 1905, a period of sixteen years of 
marvelous speed development that 2:10 has only been 
beaten once. 

The following list of winners for the last ten years 
of the C. of C. may also be of interest: 

George Starr, with Planet 2:12; D. Raybould, with 
Milton S. 2:08}; D. Wilson, with Split Silk 2:08}; H. 
Sanders, with Shade On 2.09; M. E, McHenry, with 
Bonnie Direct 2:10}; Ed Lockwood, with 'Star Pugh 
2:09}; Ed. Geers, with Direct Hal 2:06}; John Hussey, 
Elastic Pointer 2:07}; Ed Geers, with Baron Grattan 
2:06}; Ed. Geers, with Walter Direct 2:05}. 



How to Cure Distemper, Coughs, Etc. 

Our readers who hare ever bad an epidemic ot distemper 
among hones will realise that a remedy that both prevents nod 
oures 'he disease Is Invaluable, The experience ot thousands ot 
practical horsemen has proved that there Is such a remeoy, and 
this 1) fortified by the positive guarantee i f the manufacturers to 
refund the money If the remedy falls. We ask our readers to. 
peruse the advertisement of Craft's Distemper and Cru» b Cure in, 
.this Issue, not mly because knowledge of the remedy miy save 
their suck, but also because they ought to send for tbe pamphlet 
offered free, entitled "Veterinary Pointers " It gives laluable 
general Information and explains bow epidemic and catarrhal 
diseases of stock, etc. may be canity cured Write the Wells 
tbe Wells Medicine Co., 13 Third St., Lafayette, Ind., for It. 

Jackson's Napa Soda does not tangle the fe*t. 



August 5, 1905 j 



(folic gvee&cv aufc Qpovtsmati 



GRAND CIRCUIT IN BAD SHAPE. 



Rain Spoils Close of Detroit Meeting and Cleve- 
land Declares Its Races Off. 



The last two days of the Detroit Grand Circuit 
meeting gave promise of some very high-class racing, 
but a heavy rainstorm upset all calculations on Fri- 
day, necessitating the postponement of the finish of 
several events until Saturday, when a continuation of 
the downpour compelled the association to declare all 
races finished as they stood with the exception of the 
M. & M. Consolation Stake which was by unanimous 
consent postponed until Monday at the Cleveland 
track. 

Just before the races were to begin at Cleveland, on 
Monday, Mayor Tom Johnson issued a proclamation 
stating that pool selling would not be permitted at 
the track. This announcement, coming at the last 
moment, created consternation among horsemen and 
the members of the Cleveland Driving Park Associa- 
tion. At the meeting of the Grand Circuit last year 
pool selling was prevented by the authorities at Glen- 
ville with a resulting great lo;s to the Drivirg Park 
Association. When Glenville was annexed to Cleve- 
land it was hoped that pool selling would be per- 
mitted, although no announcement to that effect could 
be obtained from Mayor Johnson . 

Early on Monday , Chief Kohler of the local Police 
Department, acting under direction of Mayor John- 
son, called upon Secretary Dietrich of the Driving 
Park Association and informed him that pool selling 
would not be permitted. A meetirg of the officers of 



the pacer's position, being second in the two remain- 
ing heats. 

The 2:11 pace was the last race of the day, first 
money going to the East View Farm mare Josie, who 
barely saved her distance in the first heat by phenom- 
enal speed after making a bad break going round the 
first turn. The summaries: 

Trotting, 2: is class, purse $1500. 

Glenwood M , br h by Bobby Burns (Graham) 1 1 l 

rurl.y.brg (Geers) 2 2 2 

Jim * en ton, br g (McDeimou) 3 4 3 

J horn Boy, grg (Patterson) 4 3 4 

Joe N , blk g (D. McDonald) 6 5 5 

Mamie It., bm (Oe Ryder) 5 6 7 

Marnoy.ro g (Urown) 7 7 6 

AustloBoy.bg (Valentine) ds 

Silver Ore, grg (Stewart) ds 

B-lladl.bm (Ruiherford) ds 

Mary Celeste, blk m (J'.iuton) ds 

Time— 2:08a, 2:1054, 2:09%. 

Pacing, 2:24 class, Chamber of Commerce Consolation stakes, 
$1000. 

Hal C . ch g by Hal Dlllard (Geers) 1 I 4 

Bonnie Wilkes, ch m by Fred Wilkes (Howard) 2 3 1 

Albuta. blkg (Walker and Curry) 3 2 2 

Druid Vixr-on. br m (S Snider) 4 4 4 

Bystander, bg (Wheat) ds 

Time- 2:1054. 2:10, 2:10 
Pacing, 2:11 class purse $1500. 

Josie, b m by Glenelg (De Ryder) 1 I 

Peruna, b g by Norbells (Murphy) 1 2 3 

Irish Jack, br g (Stanley) 2 4 2 

Lady Bell Brook, br m (Snider) 3 6 4 

Lady Moler, b m (Valentine) 7 3 2 

Florodora, br m (McGuire) 4 5 5 

Billy J, be (Steflee) 5 8 7 

Christina Simmons, blk m (Snider) 6 7 6 

Jim Kyle, bh (Castle) 8 ds 

Time— 2:0954, 2:0954, 2:0854- 

FRIDAY AT DETROIT. 

After two heats had been decided in each of the 
three races scheduled for the day, a long continued 




ZEPHYR 2:11 by ZOMBRO 

Winner at Windsor and Detroit 



the association was immediately called, and it was 
decided to finish the Merchants and Manufacturers 
Consolation race, which was unfinished at Detroit, 
and then abandon the meeting. This was done and 
all gate admission fees were refunded, together with 
the entrance fees of horsemen. It was at first in- 
tended to transfer the races to Buffalo, but telegraph 
Inquiry revealed the fact that Buffalo would not per- 
mit the transfer because of Interference with the 
regular race week there. The horsemen, therefore, 
scattered, some of them going to Buffalo and else- 
where, and some of them remaining at Glenville to 
work out. 

THURSDAY AT DETROIT. 

The first race on the program was the 2:15 trot, for 
whloh eleven horses scored for the word. Glenwood 
M., a brown horse by Bobby Burns, was the favorite 
In this event, and won all the way in each of the three 
heats, although Geers made the hottest kind of a 
drive with Turley at the finish of every mile and was 
second In eaoh heat. The time was fast, and the 
race stamps Glenwood M as a good one that will be 
able to give some of the 2:06 trotters a race a little 
later In the season. 

The Chamber of Commerce Consolation, with five 
starters, went to Hal C, who won the first two heats, 
Bonnie Wilkes getting the third. Ben Walker drove 
Albuta In the first heat of this race, but the judges 
did not like the way he handled the gelding and took 
him out the sulky, substituting Curry, who improved 



shower prevented any more racing and the final heats 
of these races went over. Two of the fields were 
small but the 2:06 pace furnished excitement enough 
for two days' racing In the opening heat of this race 
Hazel Patch piloted a bunch of fast ones to the dis- 
tance stand, with Baron Gratton and Win field Stratton 
alternating in forcing the pace. Right in front of tho 
stand Hazel Patch swerved a little and Stratton won 
by inches only, with Baron almost even with Hazel. 
A bad drive of Lang, behind Ecstatic, called for the 
attention of the judges, and they declared all bets off. 
The second heat was a wonderful race all the way, 
heads separating the four In front. Baron Gratton 
won by one stride over Riley B , while the rest ol the 
bunch were in almost a straight line across the track 
at Riley's neck. It was the best finish of the meeting. 

The M. and M. Consolation saw Getaway, a bad 
performer, as favorite. Ho broke twice badly, but 
made a bruising finish with Mlss-ln-Law. In the 
second heat Miss-in-Law led all the way by an open 
length, Getaway breaking so badly that he narrowly 
escaped the flag. 

The first heat of the 2:10 trot was easy for Zephyr, 
and the seoond heat was equally easy for Norman B., 
owing to Zephyr's bad break. 

NO RACING SATURDAY. 
Rain fell again on Saturday, preventing any racing 
whatever and the association decided to settle the 2:06 
pace and 2:10 trot according to the standing of the 
horses the day before. The finish of the Consolation 



stake of the M. & M. was by consent postponed until 

Monday at Cleveland, where Miss-in-Law won the 

final heat and the money, with Getaway second. The 

summaries of the races of Friday, at Detroit, and of 

the M. & M. Consolation, two heals of which were at 

Detroit and one at Cleveland are as follow*: 

Pacing, 2:C6 class, purse $1500. 

wYn^elo'stnmrV^'T ? ra o tl0D ' "am by Dame Leon . . (Geers) 3 1 
winneid blratiou, b h by Saraway.dam Blue Pearl... 

RtleyB'blk'h. (McGuire) I 

Hazel Patch, blk a.. A S , DOW ) b , „ 

Anidrosis.cbg.. (Flack) 2 7 

Ecstatics! bm,... (Allen) 4 3 

cap.am s,.hynx. b gv::;;."::::::;;;;;;;;;:::;;;;;^^' ? \ 

Tlme-2:05 54, 2:0554. 
Trotting, 2:;4 clafs, M. & M. Consolation, purse $2C0O 
M e ta"i n av^T;^ rmbyPoDCedeLeon - damM y la 'Tracey) 1 I 1 

Time-2:1354, 2:14'/,, 2:1IJ4. 
Trotting. 2:10 class, purse $1500. 

Zephyr, b m by Zombro, dam Oazolle (Geers) 1 2 

Browne l^l^^^^^^^ \ \ 
Time-2:12, 2:1254. 

Wild Horses May Be Shot in Colorado. 

Stockmen of Routt and Rio Blanco counties, in the 
Western part of Colorado, for several years have 
been trying to get rid of a big band of wild horses 
that inhabit the extreme northwestern part of the 
State and are the cause of endless trouble, says the 
Denver Record- Stockman. It is claimed that there 
are at least 4000 head in the numerous bands that 
roam that section, and every horse that once gets 
loose adds to the number. It is claimed that mares 
oven break away from fenced pastures when the call 
of the wild comee from the stallion leading orje of. 
these bands, and once they get in one of these wild 
bunches they are hopelessly lost ;>nd become as wild 
as the worst of them. 

Efforts to round up these horses have resulted in a 
few hundred being captured, but it is claimed the 
herds are increasing notwithstanding these efforts. 
A number of big stockmen in the western part of the 
State have had so many losses that thoy are openly 
ad vocating that these wild horses be killed off and 
that a hunt be organized to have them shot, as the 
only practicable method of ridding that section of 
this constant menace. Indeed, it Is claimed that 
several outfits have already instructed their men to 
shoot these horses wherever found . The new stoci 
association organized at Hayden last week has under 
consideration the matter of asking the State board of 
stock inspection commissioners for permission to 
organize a general hunt to wage a war of extermina- 
tion on these animals. Speaking of the matter, Mr. 
McCrillis, secretary of the board, said: 

"While the board would be very glad to see these 
wild horses captured or destroyed, they would natur- 
ally hesitate about giving such a wild license to 
slaughter them for fear that it might be the cause of 
other hoi ses being shot. There is one plan, however, 
that might produce results, and that is to kill off the 
stallions. These wild horses are divided into small 
bands of mares, each led by a stallion. If the stallions 
could be killed off I believe that the mares could be 
rounded up more readily and as breeding would thus 
be stopped to a large extent, thero would be a chance 
to soon get rid of the nuisance. I believe the board 
would be willing to grant that much of authority at 
least." 

It is probable that the matter will be brought to 
the official attention ol the board very shortly. 

Peter C. Kellogg Dead. 

Peter C. Kellogg, known all over the United States 
as an auctioneer of trotting bred horses and Jersey 
cattle, and to every reader of journals devoted to 
livestock breeding by his nom dc plume of "Hark 
Comstock," died at his summer home, Montclalre, 
New Jersey, July 24th, aged 64 years. Peter C. 
Kellogg was one of tho greatest writers on the breed- 
ing of harness horses that ever wielded a pen. He 
wrote common sense instead of theory and had the 
ability to "hold fast that wh'ch Is good" and discard 
everything else In the way of evidence. 

He was the originator of combination sales of fine 
horses, Introducing the system among breeders In 
New York about thirty years ago, when he conduoted 
an auction In which A. B. Darling, of the Fifth Avenue 
Hotel, received 310,00.0 for the trotting stallion, 
Kentucky Prince. Mr. Kellogg In the ensuing fifteen 
years sold trotters aggregating In value several 
millions of dollars. H obtained from E. H. Harrlman 
a bid of $41,000 for Stamboul, from Marcus Daly a 
bid of 826,000 for Mascot, an untried two-year-old 
trotter, and from J. H. Shultza bid of 88500 for Barop 
Rose, a yearling trotter. Commissions on his sales 
made Mr. Kellogg wealthy. 

The death of Peter C. Kellogg is a distinct loss to 
the entire country and particularly to turf journalism, 



8 



[AUGUST 5, 1906 



SScSsa fe ffS^i i>oJSiSj S^s2iej£is3 : ^ LsSt^sa L«K"S2isa "^K^sa tsKEisa) KSSiEa i^Sisa Ss5=1e3 bEsSs BbS t»5t5is3 ts&Sisa 

ROD, GUN AND KENNEL. i 

Conducted by J. X. lie WITT. 

B§ E3^3|§1 G3ra£S] :=3 ^S ^^^SSS :;3 ^S E35~££3 7^&^ ^^^5 G^Sgg] C3^gC3^KG3^aE3^gE3^^ra^^ 



Coming Events. 

Rod. 

April l-Sept. 10. Oct. 18-Feb. 1— Open season for taking stoel- 
lead In tidewater. 
April l-Sept. 15— Closed season for lobsters and crawfish. 
April 1-Nov. 1— Tnut season open. 
June 1-Jan. 1— Open season (or black bass. 

Aug. 26— Saturday Fly-Casting Contest No. 10. Stow lake. 2:30 
p. m. 

Aug. 27— Sunday Fly Casting Contest No. 10. Stow lake, 10 a.m. 
Sept. 10-Oct. 16 -Close season in tidewater for steelbead. 
Sept. 10-Oct. 16— Close season for catching salmon. 
Oct. 16-Nov. 15— Close season for taking salmon above tide, 
water. 

Nov. I-Sept. 1— Open season for crabs. 

Nov. 15-Sept. 10— Season open for taking salmon above tide 
water. 

Gob. 

Feb. 15-Sept. 1— Closed season for mountain quail, grouse and 
sage hen. 

Feb. 15-Oct. 15— Closed season for quail, ducks, etc. 
April 1-Oct. 15— Close season for English snipe. 
July 1-Feb. 15— Dove season open. 
Aug 1-Oct. 15— Deer season open. 

Aug Sebastopol Gun Club. Blue rocks. Every Sunday. 

Aug 6— Golden Gate Gun Club. Blue rocks. Iogleside. 
Aug. 6— Blue Rock Gun Club. High-street grounds, Alameda. 
Aug, 6, 20— Petaluma Gun Club. Blue rocks. Kenilworth Park_ 
Aug. 6, 20— Mount View Gun Club. Blue rocks. Mount View. 
Cal. 

Aug 13— California Wing Club. Live pigeons. Ingleside. 
Aug 13— Open to all blue rockshoot. Hunters' Inn, San Leandro. 
Aug 13, 27— Fisb and Game Gun Club Blue rocks. San Jose. 
Aug. 13. 27— Santa Rosa Gun Club. Blue rocks. 
Aug. 13, 27— Vallejo Gun Club. Blue rocks. Flosden Station. 
Aug. 20— Union Gun Club. Blue rocks. Ingleside. 
Aug. 27— Millwood Gun Club. .Blue rocks. Mill Valley 
Junction. 

Aug. 27— Lincoln Gun Club. Live birds. Reclamation Station- 
Aug. 29. 30— Interstate Association tournament. Blue rocks. 
Denver, Col. 

Sept. 9, 10— Empire Gun Club. Merchandise shoot. Blue rocks. 
Alameda Junction. 

Sept. 15, 16, 17— Interstate shoot. Blue rocks. Ingleside. Elmer 
E. Shauer, Manager. Pacific Coast Handicap under auspices of 
S. F. Trapshooting Ass n., A. M. Shields, Secretary 

Sept. 30-Oct. 1— Two-day blue rock tournament. Biggs, Butte 
county. H. Haselbusch, manager 

Sept. 30-Oct. 1— BlggsGunClub. Two-day blue rock tournament. 
Biggs, Cal. 

Bench Shows. 

Aug. 15, 18— Orange County Agricultural Society. Middletown- 
N. Y. D. A. Morrison, Secretary. 

Aug. 23, 25— Rockland County Industrial Association. Bench 
show in New York City. A. A Vanderbllt, Secretary. 

Aug. 31-Sept 2 -Newport Dog Show. Newport, R. L Francis M. 
Ware, Secretary 

Sept. 9— San Mateo Kennel Club. 2nd annual show. One day. 

Sept. Santa Cruz Kennel Club. Inaugural show. Santa 

Cruz, Cal. 

Oct. Stockton Kennel Club F. A. Gelsea, Secretary, Stock 

ton, Cal. 

Sept. 16— Englewood Kennel Club. Englewood. N. J. M.W 
Robinson, Secretary. 

Sept. 27. 28— Valley Fair Kennel Club. Brattleboro, Vt. 
Howard C. Rice, Secretary. 

Oct. 3, 6— Danbury Agricultural Society, Danbury, Conn. G. 
M. Rundle, Secretary. Jas. Mortimer, Superintendent. 

Nov. 15, 18— Boston Terrier Club Specialty Club. Boston. F. 
H. Osgood, Secretary. 

Nov 28-Djo. 1— Philadelphia Dog Show Association. Phila- 
delphia. J. Sergeant Price, Secretary. 

1906. 

Feb. 12, 15— Westminster Kennel Club. New York. Robt. V. 
McKlm, Secretary. 

Feb. 20, 23— New England Kennel Club. Boston. Wm. B. 
Emery, Secretary. 

March 7, 10— Duquesne Kennel Club. Pittsburg, Pa. F. S. 
Steadman, Secretary. 

Field Trials. 

Aug. 15— Iowa Field Trial Club. Geo. C. Cooper, Secretary, P. 
O. Box 55, Des Moines, la. 

Aug. 23— North Dakota Field Trial Club. Inaugural trials 
Grand Forks, N. D A E. Palmer, Secretary. Grand Forks, N. D. 

Sept 4— Nebraska Field Trial Association. 4th annual trials. 
O'Neill, Neb. H. H. McCarthy, Secretary, O'Neill, Neb. 

Sept. 6— Manitoba Field Trial Club, 19th annual trials. La 
Salle. Man. Eric Hamber, Secretary, Wlnnepeg Man. 

Sept. 21— British Columbia Field Trial Club, 3d annual trials. 
Ladner, B C. H. S Rolston, Secretary , Vancouver. B. C. 

Oct. 12— Pacific Northwest Field Trial Club. La Conner Flats, 
Wash. Chas. L. Lundy, Secretary, Seattle, Wash 

Oot. 23— Ohio Field Trial Association Washington Court House. 
O. C. T. Phillips, Secretary, Columbus, O. 

Oct. 30— American Field Futurity Stake. For Pointers and 
Setters whelped on or after January 1, 1904, whose dams have 
been duly qualified. Robinson, 111., entries closed July 1. Address 
Am. Field Publishing Co., Chicago. 

Oct. 31— Connecticut Field Trial Club. Hampton, Conn, F. M. 
Ohapln, Secretary, Pine Meadow, Conn. 

Nov. 6— Independent Field Trial Association. Hutsonvllle. 111. 
S. H Socwell, Secretary, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Nov 13— Illinois Field Trial Association. Robinson, 111. Wm. 
R. Green, Secretary, Marshall, 111. 

Nov Indiana Field Trial Club, (Week following Illinois 

Champion Stake). C. F. Young, Seoretary, Clay City, Ind. 

Nov. 21— International Field Trial Club. Ruthven, Ont. W. B. 
Wells, Honorary Seoretary, Chatham, Ont. 

Dec. 2— Continental Field Trial Club, 11th annual trials, . 

John White, Secretary, Hempstead, Long Island. 

Deo. Pointer Club of America (following the Continental 

trials). Barber, N. C. C. F. Lewis, Secretary, 126 Maiden Lane, 
New York. 

Dec. 12— Eastern Field Trial Club. Waynesboro, Ga. S. C. 
Bradley, Secretary, Fairfield, Conn. 

1906. 

Jan Pacific Coast Field Trials Club, 23d annual trials. 

Bakersfleld, Cal. Albert Betz. Secretary, 201 Parrott Bldg., San 
Francisco. 



San Francisco Fly-Casting Club. 

Southwest wind and foggy weather conditions pre- 
vailed at Stow lake during the two days' fly-casting 
in contest No. i) of the San Francisco Fly-Casting Club. 

On Saturday the degree of skillful rod and line 
work resulting will be readily understood where the 
average percentage of every contestant save two — one 
of them a new member — was over 90 per cent in each 
event excepting long distance. In the long distance 
casting, while the results were excellent practically, 
the wind was a handicap on the usual long casts of 
from 100 to 120, or more feet. This event, while it is 
a great developer for work on a trout stream, is not 
of the importance of the accuracy and delicacy cast- 
ing. In the latter events the rod6ters vie with each 
other in placing the barbless red fly close to the 
anchored buoys gently and without ?plash of line or 
leader. 

This is the work that tells on the strear$ when cast- 
ing for a rise and strike by big trout. To place the 
artificial lure just over a likely place or near a fish, 
softly and without disturbing the surface of the 
water, and with line and leader straight and ready for 
proper work with the reel is the ultimate ambition of 
every trout angler. 

In the lure casting event, where the rod wielders 
used a half-ounce rubber frog and cast at different 
buoys from sixty to one hundred feet distant, the con- 
testants were in championship form. C. G. Young in 
five casts scored 98 1-15 per cent, Walter U. Mansfield 
and T. C. Kierulff 98 per cent each, and Colonel G C 
Edwards over 90 per cent. In back scores both Young 
and Kierulff exceeded the above percentages. This 
style of casting — bait casting it is — is in vogue for 
black bass fishing principally. 

Sunday's long distance work, while not- up to the 
average by reason of the wind, was better than on 
the preceding day. A remarkable improvement is 
noticeable in the accuracy oastirg of Mr Kiprulff, who 
scored 97 per cent. Messrs. Mansfield, C. R Kenniff 
and Lane made top notch scores in the delicacy 
event. The showing of Mr. H. B Sperry is almost 
phenomenal for a contestant of one season's experi- 
ence at the lakeside. 

Saturday Contest No. 9, Class Series. Stow Lake. July 29. 
1905. Wind southwest. Weather, foggy Judges, Mr Geo. W. 
Lane and Mr. T. C. Kierulff; referee, Mr. F. H Reed; clerk, Mr. A. 
Craig. 



Events 






2 




a 




3 
b 




C 


4 


Young, G. C 


95 


93 


4-12 


93 


8-12 


91 


8-12 


92 


8-12 


98 1 


Lane, Geo W 




93 


8-12 


e>; 


4-12 


HO 


8-12 


96 


6-12 




Reed, F H 




88 


8-12 


92 




Ml 


2 12 


90 


7-12 




Kierulff, T C 


86 


92 


8-12 


91 


4-12 


95 


10-12 


93 


7-12 


98" 


Edwards. G C 


98 


89 




91 


8-12 


90 


10-12 


91 


3-12 


96.4 


Brooks. Dr. W. E... 


99 


94 


8-12 


93 


4-12 


95 


10-12 


94 


7-12 




Kfrk, H H 


80 






85 


4-12 


79 


2-12 


82 


3-12 




Mansfield, WD... 




95 




95 


4-12 


99 


2-, 


97 


3-12 


98" 


Re Entry— 






















Young. G. C 


95 


94 




95 




94 


2-12 


94 


7-12 


98.4 


Reed, F H 




93 


8-12 


89 




93 


4-12 


91 


2-12 




Kierulff. T. C 


91 


94 


4-12 


95 




90 


10-12 


92 


11-12 


92 9 


Lane G W 




93 




98 




98 


4-12, 


98 


.2-12 




Kirk H. H 


78' 






90 


8-12 


79 


2-12 


B l 


11-12 




Brooks, Dr W E .. 


99 





















Sunday Contest No. 8. Class Series Stow Lake, luly 30, 
1905. Wind, southwest. Weather, fojtgy. Judges, Dr. W E. 
Brooks and Mr C R. Kennifl; referee, Mr. C. G Young; cleru, Mr. 
A. Craig. 



Events 



1 



Young, C G 

Brooks Dr. W. E.. 

Everett, E 

lluyck.Chas 

Kirk. II. H , 

Halght, F. M 

Kenniff, O. R 

Reed F. H 

Sperry, H B 

Sperry. Austin 

Mansfle'.d, W D... 

Lane, Geo. W 

Kierulff, T C 

Re-Entry— 

Kirk II. H 

Kierulff, T C 

Sperry H B 

Lane. Geo. W 

Huyek. Chas 

Kenniif, C R 

Sperry, Austin 











a 




b 




C 




84 


96 


8-12 


96 


4-12 


H 


4-12 


h? 


4-12 


89 


101 


93 




W 




98 


4-12 


9.1 


4-12 




91 


85 


4-12 


85 


4-12 


95 




90 


2-12 




80 


88 


8-12 


90 




89 


2-12 


89 


7-12 




75 


70 


4-12 


83 


4-12 


84 


2-12 


83 


9- IV 






91 


4-12 


(8 


8-li 


85 


10-12 


87 


3-12 




io?" 


94 


8-12 


95 




100 


!I7 


6-12 






90 




92 


4-12 


92 


6-12 


92 


5-12 




94" 


85 


4-12 


93 


8-12 


97 


6-12 


95 


T 12 92 


89 


89 


4-12 


83 




85 




84 




75 




93 


8-12 


96 


4-IS 


98 


4-12 


97 


4-12 


87 




88 




96 


8-12 


98 


4-12 


97 


6-12 






97 




86 


4-12 


88 


4-12 


87 


4-12 


6i 


74 


72 


4-12 


78 




81 


8-12 


79 


10-12 






93 


4-11 


90 


4-12 


89 


2-12 


89 


9-12 


92 


95 


90 




94 


4-12 


98 


4-12 


96 


4-12 


93 




89 


4-12 


93 




99 


2-12 


96 


1-12 




83 




















107 
85 





















4S-NOTE: Event 1— Distance ^Casting, feet. Event 2— Ac- 
curacy percentage. Event 3— Delicacy, (a) accuracy percentage 
(b) delicacy percentage; (c) net percentage. Event 4— Lure cast 
ing percentage. 
The fractions in lure casting are 15ths. 



Steelhead are about due in the Soquel and many 
anglers who have had the pleasure of fishing in that 
Santa Cruz stream know what is in store for them. 



An Immense fisb, resembling a monster rockcod in 
shape and darker in color, but many times as large, 
was caught in Monterey bay, near Santa Cruz, on 
Wednesday morning. The fish weighed 310 pounds 
and has a mouth large enough to swallow a good-sized 
boy. It was Caught by Louis Beverino, an Italian 
fisherman Local fishermen call it a jewfish, and say 
that it is many years since one of the species has been 
seen on that part of the Coast. This variety of fish is 
frequently caught at Catalina island. It was the 
center of many curious spectators on the beach where 
it was placed on exhibition. 



Santa Cruz Salmon Fishing. 

Notwithstanding that the run of salmon up to the 
present time in Monterey bay has been phenomenal, 
and that excellent catches are being made every day, 
the San Jose dailies printed anarticie deprecating the 
salmon fishing near Santa Cruz that aroused the ire, 
and justly so, of public spirited Santa Ciuz citizens 

In reply to the following paragraph, introductory 
to a letter from discouraged or unskillful fishermen: 
"Santa Cruz is undergoing a lull in the run of salmon. 
The fish have failed ttie angler pretty regularly for 
the past week, and local lovers of the sport, who are 
returning from the Surf City, bring rather discourag- 
ing reports. 

The Sentinel states: One swallow does not make a 
summer, neither does the failure of the San Jose 
anglers to catch but one salmon warrent the Mercury- 
Herald in stating that "local lovers of the sport * * * 
bring rather discouraging reports." 

Manager Fred W. Swanton of the Casino is indig- 
nant that such reports should be spread by such 
reputable papers as the Mercury and Herald. He said 
recently, "Why that is sheer nonsense. C. G. H. Mt- 
Bride, the San Jose capitalist, came in only this 
morning with 15 big salmon, a party of Denver'ladies 
and gentlemen got 37 good oneB, and Captain Jackson 
returned from the morning's outiDg with no less than 
45, Uhden's launch got 42 and Miss Ethel Hager of 
San Francisco got 20, one of them weighing 30 pounds, 
and— well, is that eDough?" The Sentinel man thought 
it was plenty aad suggested that perhaps Mr. Don- 
nelly's launch got over among the sea orange groves, 
or the forest of hotse's tails and sea ferns, v> hich the 
glass bottomed boat has just discovered near Light- 
house point. Who knows? At any rate, it would be 
ad visable for the San Jose men to see Mr. Swanton 
about the best fishing grounds, if they want to catch 
fi9h and not seaweed " 

We learn from Dr. F. B. A. Lewis of San Jose, 
whose cottage is across the river at Santa Cruz and 
who goes out two or three times each week during 
the salmon season, that wbile the fisb have been 
plentiful in the bay this year they have been unusually 
erratic. Generally, after a few days' skirmishing 
about, they settle in some one locality, where they 
may be found within certain limits and where the 
launches are able to find them each day. The season, 
thus far, has been somewhat different; they are in one 
place today and in another tomorrow. On the 5th of 
July Dr Lewis, with the boatmen of a launch, in six 
hours landed 104 fine salmon, beside other fish. On 
the 7th the doctor got 20, and so this number is con- 
stantly changing, which accounts for the contradic- 
tory reports in the newspapers. 

Without doubt the variations of temperature of the 
present season, together with the influences upon the 
constantly moving bait, regulate the catches of each 
day One thing can be said and that is, there is no 
more royal sport for a rod and reel fisherman than in 
that vicinity, and at almost any time in the summer. 
One expert fisherman, who resides in Boston but tries 
the waters of all the States where good sport is to be 
had, said to Dr Lewis, with whom he fished last sea- 
son, that if Eastern men believed that such fishing 
for salmon in the open sea was to be bad there, there 
would be scores who would cross the country to have 
a hand in it. Possibly people expect too much — a 
half-dozen fine salmon in a half day should suffice and 
are surely enough for any reasonable angler. 



LLEGAL FISHING NEAR STOCKTON. 

Stockton anglers have until recently enjoyed ex- 
cellent fishing in the slough and creeks nearby But 
of late serious complaint is made that fisb are getting 
scarcer day by day This is but a reiteration of 
similar plaints from other localitiep. The caute for 
the growing scarcity of fish is the alleged prevailing 
evil — the illegal use of nets and the non observance of 
the law which probib'ts net fishing with fixed nets, 
on Saturdays and Sundays, and the illegal netting of 
black bass. 

Fishing not lone ago was very good in North street 
canal, but of late very few bass have been caught in 
those waters. It is believed that unscrupulous fisher- 
men have placed nets in front of the mouth and have 
stopped the fish from entering the canal. 

It is said that of late many pounds of bass have been 
sold by peddletsin Stockton. The officers say there 
is only one way to prove that fish have been caught 
unlawfully and that is to catch the men at work. 

Stockton sportsmen and those of the surrounding 
country who enjoy fishing- are in sympathy with the 
efforts of the Sheriff's office in trying to apprehend 
illegal fishermen. The streams near that city were 
stocked some four or five yearo ago with black and 
striped bass, and at the present time the waters con- 
tain numerous fish. Those fishermen who have been 
successful in the past in catching the gamy fishes state 
that of late they have not been so successful. Some- 
thing has interfered with the sport. It is not that the 
supply of fish has diminished on account of lawful 
fishing, but the real cause is the result of certain un- 
lawful fishing that has prevailed lately. 

According to the fish law, fishing with fastened nets 
is prohibited. A fisherman can fish with a net, pro- 
viding he allows the net to float with the tide. He 
cannot even fasten a net to a boat. That those who 
have been breaking the law know the stand they 
have been taking is apparent by the manner in which 
they have been operating. Deputy Sheriff Edwards 
confiscated a net he found near the mouth of the 
North street canal, which had been fastened in such a 
manner as to hide it from view. A dozen or more 
nets have been found by the officers during the past 
month. As the nets raDge in value all the way from 
$150 to $300 the unlawful fishermen loses considerable, 
when an officer happens to fall upon one of them. 



Ballard's lake black oato Uauing is still worth a trip 
to Olivette. 



Over five hundred salmon were landed one day re- 
cently by Santa Cruz fishing boats. 



Strikel— If they don't give you Jackson sNapa Soda 
wber> you ask for it. 



August 5, 1905J 



(iTuc *3v£er»cr cutis ^purismcm 



9 



Poachers Punished. 

Fish and game law violaters have bad a strenuous 
time recently for various infractions of the State law. 

Deputy Fish Commissioner W. R. Welch on July 
23rd arrested a young man from Berkeley, M. God- 
dard, who wa9 exercising his skill as a marksman 
with a six-shooter at Independence Lake. He tried 
to organize a shooting match at Independence among 
the guests at the hotel but finally started out alone. 
As an evidence of his skill he brought in one wild 
duck that he had shot. Deputy Welch happening to 
be in that vicinity took Mr. Goddard and the duck in 
charge. He pleaded guilty before Justice Hill of 
Truckee who conferred upon him a medal and assessed 
him at tbe same time $25 for his fun. 

Early in the morning of July 24 th Deputy Welch 
discovered John Summers at Truckee moving around 
in a suspicious manner with a creel full of trout. It 
being known to the Fish Commissioners that trout 
less than one pound in weight were being sold in 
Truckee, Mr. Welch was on the lookout for develop- 
ments. Presently George D. Bertha, a Pullman con- 
ductor, and Summers were in close conversation. 
Welch saw seven small fi9h passed from Summers' 
basket to Bertha, and a half dollar being transferred 
from Bertha's pocket to Summers' pocket. He placed 
bjth men under arrest. Later in the day Bertha de- 
cided that the shortest way out of the difficulty was 
to plead guilty before Justice Hill, which he did and 
paid a fine of $20. Summers wants to contest the law. 
A preliminary hearing was granted him and he was 
held to answer before the Superior Court at Nevada 
City, where his trial will take place. 

Justice Clack of Visalia fined M. R. Demaree $25 for 
killing wild ducks during the close season on July 
25th. Demaree had eighteen duck9 when arrested by 
Deputy Fish Commissioner M. F. Janes, which would 
make their cost about $1.40 each, and the State con- 
fiscated the birds besides. 

Chas. Sutro, prominent in sportsmen circles, con 
fessed an error of judgment in shipping more than 25 
pounds of trout in one day. Mr. Sutro had been at 
Lake Tahoe and wanted to remind his friends of that 
fact, but out of the goodness of his heart he ran 
against one of the laws and a deputy fish commis- 
sioner, who was watching affairs. While it was plainly 
evident that Mr. Sutro did not intend to be in conflict 
with the law, he realized his mistake and was too 
much of a gentleman and sportsman to avoid the con- 
sequences of his error, and cheerfully made of himself 
a martyr to the cau»e of fish and game preservation 
and contributed $20 to tbe State Fish Commission 
Fund, before Justice Haley at Tahoe City last week. 

In the court of Justice Atchinson of Santa Rosa, 
Chris M. Anderson, one of a gang of three who at- 
tacked Deputy Fish Commissioner Ralph, was on 
Thursday last fined $100 on a charge of assault and 
$25 for killing a quail during the close season. His 
partner in mischief, W. H. Nolan, i9 out of jail on 
$1000 cash bail. The charge against him is for u sing 
a firearm in a threatening manner. The date of his 
trial has Dot been set. These men had bean languish- 
ing in the county jail at Santa Rosa for the past three 
weeks, since July 5th, when in resisting arrest, for 
killing quail out of season, at the hands of Deputy 
Ralph, they caused a -'rough house" on the train 
near Geyserville. One of the gang escaped by jump- 
ing from the train, and Anderson and Nolan were 
taken into custody only after a hard tight in which 
the officer was roughly handled. In the prosecution 
of these cases the officers of Sonoma county have 
spared no efforts in the work of punishing the guilty 
men. 

Thomas Hill was fined $40 by Justice Baldwin of 
Eureka for having deer hides in his possession, and 
E. A Jenke paid $25 fine in Justice Delghan's court 
at Rio Dell for a like offense. C. A. Divoll was fined 
$25 at Sonora for killing deer out of season. 



TItOUT ANGLING. 

Mid-summer trout angling days are hereand the 
knowing fishermen are taking advantage of the 
situation. 

Reports from the various fishing resorts on the 
Upper Sacramento — Lemoine, Castella, Shasta, etc. — 
are to the effect that fly-fishiDg is at its best Trout 
are more in evidence than they have been for years 
past, great sport has been had and splendid catches 
made. The weather has been favorable and the in- 
dications are for a continuance of good weather. 

Floyd Judah was at Shasta Springs last week and 
made limit catches for several days He s-ys the 
killing flies are the royal governor, Yosemite, royal 
coachman and gray and brown hackles. The spoon • 
may also be used there with good success. 

On the Truckee the fly-fishing has been sd good 
that anglers are jubilant over the great sport now to 
be had on that grand trouting water. A number of 
local rodsters have been stopping at Boca for the past 
few weeks. The best fishing is to be found about 
four mile9 up river, where the water is clear. 



Striped bass angling isnot what it was this time la- 
year by any long odds. Fishermen who have repeat" 
edly tried all of their favorite resorts and generally 
with but meagre results are gradually coming to the 
conclusion tbat the bass are getting scarcer and 
scarcer. Id fact, some anglers contend tbat tbe fish 
are going as did the sturgeon and tbe shad. Open 
season all the year, incessant fishing by tbe net men 
and the wholesale taking of email and under-sized fish 
with illegal sized mesh nets and also set nets will in 
the near future make striped bass but a memory. 

As an instance, there was about a dozen fishermen 
on San Antone slougb last Sunday, tbe fish caught did 
not average one to the rod. Al M. dimming got one 
small fish on Sunday and nothing on Saturday. This 
creek was a splendid bass fishing resort four and five 
years ago, even up to two years ago, but the net men 
have about cleaned it out. 



AT THE TRAPS. 



The Golden Gate Gun Club shoot at Ingleside will 
be the local trap shooting feature tomorrow. 



The Millwood Gun Club shoot at Mill Valley last 
Sunday was a notable meet in one respect and that 
was the shooting of Mr. Van Norden, who ran up a 
score of over 50 consecutive breaks and was high gun 
throughout the day. He started in by winning the 
opening event, a freeze out shoot, breaking 9 targets, 
Haas and Newlands broke 8 each. Event 2, the medal 
race, was won by R. Haas, who scored 20 breaka, Van 
Norden was a tie for second place in this race. 

In the cup event Van Norden broke 23 out of 27 and 
won the race, Lockwood was second high gun. In 
event 4, sealed conditions, at 20 targets, he was tied 
by Price on 18 breaks. In the shoot off he won with a 
10 straight. In the final race of the day, a continuous 
break shoot, he rolled up a run of 31 breaks. The 
prior score of Haas, 13 breaks, stood for all of the 
past season, and was believed would win out but the 
run of 31 eclipsed everything else and will no doubt 
remain unbeaten for the club season of 1905. Van also 
received the club cash prize of $10 for a straight of 25 
targets or better. 

A summary of scores shot follows: 

Medal event, 25 targets— R. Haas 20. R Van Norden 
18, W. Johnson 18, Mr. Lockwood 17, G. Collins, Sr. 
15, B Patrick 15, G.Collins, Jr. 14, C. Ashlin 12, G. 
T. Waymanl2, Mr. Mastick 12, H. Wagner 9. 

Cup event, target handicap, 25 possible — Van 
Norden shot at 27, broke 23; Lockwood 30-21; Haas 
27-19. Johnson 28-19; Collins, Sr. 28-17; Newlands 30- 
16; W Price 25-16; Ashlin 25-15; Wayman 27-15; 
Wagner 28-15; Johns 25-15; Mastick 25-15; Patrick 
25-13; Collins, Jr. 28-12. 

Sealed conditions, 20 targets— Van Norden 18, Price 
18, Collins, Jr. 17, Haas 16, Collins, Sr. 15, Lockwood 
15, Ashlin 15, Johnson 14, Wagner 13, Wayman 9. 

Sealed conditions, 10 targets — Johnson 8, Lockwod 
8, Price 8, Van Norden 7, Wayman 7, Collins, Jr. 6, 
Wagner 6, Patrick 6, Mastick 4, Johns 4. 

Cuff button event, continuous break — Van Norden 
31, Haas 13, Ashlin 10, Price 9, Collins, Sr. 9, Johnson 
8, Newlands 8, Lockwood 8, Collins, Jr. 8, Wayman 7, 
Wagner 7. 



The Petaluma Blue Rock Gun Club held a shoot at 
Kenliworth Park on July 23d. The following scores 
at 20 targets were made: E. E. Drees 18, J. Doss 13, 
J. Lopus 12, J.Clark 1. T. Mego 17, Northrup 14, Dr. 
Hall 10, E. O. Webb 8, T. Jarvis 16 B. Chapman 13, 
Bert Ayers 9, Frank Doss 8, M. Frederickson 11, L. 
Solomani 8, A. Solamini 7, J. Stieger 11, Potter 7. 



The open to all shoot at the Hunters' Inn near San 
Leandro on August 13th will probably draw a large 
attendance of shooters. 

The merchandise shoot will be the main feature of 
the day. Shooters will be handicapped according to 
ability, limit 25 targets. High guns will take choice 
of prizes One re-entry will be allowed, best score to 
count. In case of ties, shooters will shoot off at the 
original handicap for gun only, and if still tie, miss 
and out All other ties will be decided by lot. En- 
trance $1, including price of targets, 16 yards rise. 
Other events will ba arranged. All targets will be 
trapped at one cent per target. 

In the merchandise shoot the principal prize is a 
Remington hammerless shotgun. A variety of articles 
valued at over $75 and about $50 in cash will also be 
distributed among the winning guns. 

Thos. L. Lewis, Secretary of the Union Gun Club 
will manage the shoot. 



A. E. McKenzie, president of the Denver Gun Club 
and W. D. Burges9, a prominent trap shot of Omaha 
were in Salt Lake recently. When the two cracks 
got together theydecided to have a little fun at the 
traps. Soon several congenial fellows were hunted up 
and the bunch adjourned to the trap grounds to shoot 
for the ''championship of the universe." 

McKenzie reoresented Colorado, Burgess, Nebraska; 
Jack Sharp, Nevada, and Uncle John Sharp, Utah. 
He>-e are the results: 

Practice shoot, 25 targets- 
John F. Sharp 11100 11111 Mill 11111 11111-23 

Swem 01011 00011 01 1 1 1 11111 11111-19 

Parker 11111 01110 11111 11101 limO-lSl 

"Harry" 01010 01010 10000 0011 1 11011—12 

Match shoot, 25 targets- 
John N Sharp, Jr 11110 11110 00111 11111 11011-20 

McKenzie II 111 1110101111 11111 11111—23 

Burgess HIM 1111100111 lllll 11111-23 

' Uncle John" Sharp 1 tool lllll lllll lllll 11111—23 



Most of the shooters, and particularly the California 
contigent, who were present at the recent Northwest 
Tournament at Portland, Or., say many kind things 
about the members of tho Multnomah Rod and Gun 
Club, and praise and commend their hospitality and 
good fellowship generally. 

The efforts of a monthly publication to belittle the 
Portland shoot by imaginary and frivolous dialogue, 
attributed to several local sportsmen, are uncalled 
for anri tend to placo the alleged speakers in a false 
position. 

Whatever the writer's opinion of affairs at Portland, 
he could have expressed the same legitimately with- 
out prejudice to third parties. 

While it is conceded that there was a hitch, here 
and there, In the Portland shoot, the Webfooters 
more than made amends for a few drawbacks and 
these were not any greater than has been the ex- 
perience of every trapshooter of several seasons at- 
tention to the sport. 

The officers of the Grants Pass Gun Club are R L 
Bartlett, president; Thomas Harvey, secretary; A C 
Hough, treasurer and T J Armstrong, captain, and 
there Is a membership of 20. The club has fine 
grounds leased In the Tuffs grove, on whloh they 
have recently erected a comfortable club house 14x36 



feet. A fine well of water is in the grove and it is a 
delightful place for an outing. The arrangement for 
trap shooting is perfect, with good ligbt and back- 
ground. Tbe club intends to bold another big tour- 
nament on their grounds in October. 



The Blue Rock Gun Club of Alameda will shoot on 
the High Street grounds to-morrow. 



The last clay-pigeon match of the Honolulu Gun 
Club for the season was held June 25th at the gun 
club quarters in Manoa valley. A large crowd of 
gun enthusiasts was present and some fairly good 
shooting was done, so writes an Island sportsman. 

At noon the order to cease tiring was given by the 
general in command, or at least the board of strategy 
comprising H. E. Gares, K. B. Porter and Irwin 
Spalding, and an excellent lunch was partaken of 
There was fine chowder, potato salad, ham. sausage, 
pickles, bread and butter and cold beer. Mrs. J. w! 
Harvey acted as hostess for the club. 

Keen interest was displayed in all the events, and 
there was a prodigious amount of ammunition dis- 
charged at the targets, and much of it wasted. Even 
some of the best shots of the club were not at their 
best, failing to score when it was expected of them. 
There was one interesting shoot -off between W. E. 
Hall and H. E. Gares. They had tied in the general 
match and then decided to shoot off for five birds. 
Each broke four and tied again. The next five gave 
each three, the next two, the next one, and finally 
Mr. Wall made one bird after Mr. Gares had scored 
goose eggs in his five shots. 

J. W. Harvey and K. B. Porter were, is usual, up 
toward the head. In fact, it is hard to beat Harvey. 
E. I. Spalding made6ome fine records, and Mr. Lanz, 
in spite of some waste of ammunition, did fine 
shooting at times. 

On J uly 1, the dove season opened, and the members 
of the gun club will temporarily desert the traps for 
the keener sport of shooting at real birds on the wiDg. 
Large shooting parties were expected to hunt over 
the island on Saturday and Sunday, July 1st and 2nd. 



Mrs. W. F. Sheard of Tacoma. won marked honors 
at the twenty-first annual tournament of the Sports- 
men's Association of the Northwest. Mrs. Sheard 
was one of several lady shooters in the tournament, 
she won tne women's championship of the association, 
defeating all competitors in her class. She also took 
the women's high average and by her performance is 
the champion feminine trap shot of the Northwest. 

Mrs. Sheard shares with her husband his distinction 
a9 a champion shot. She is known as the best woman 
shot in the Northwest. She has participated in many 
tournaments throughout that territory and like Mr. 
Sheard is the holder of many medals. 



There was not a very large attendance at the 
regular shoot of the Santa Rosa Gun Club held at 
Leddy station, July 30th. The Laflin & Rand cup 
event was won by Guiltnan for tbe day as well as on 
a back score for July. The scores were as follows: 

Laflin & Rand cup race, target handicap, 25 possible, 
16 yards— Monrce. 28 targets, broke 19; GuiltDaD, 29- 
24; Elmonds, 28-15; Morrow, 28-19; Fehrman, 27-17; 
Hesse, 26-22. Back scores: Fehi man, 27-21 ; Guilt- 
nan, 30-23; Monroe, 28-19. 

The medal shoot followed and was won by Hesse 
while Guiltnan won for July 9 on a back score. The 
scores were: 

Monroe, 18 yards, 28 targets, broke 18; Fehtmnn, 20 
yards, 25-1 1 ; Monroe, 18 yards, 28-16; Hesse, 18 yards, 
28-26. Back scores: Monroe, 16 yards, 30-22. 



The Interstate shoot to bo held at Ingleside, Sep- 
tember 15, 16and 17, it is safe to say, will be the big- 
gest blue rock tournament ever held west of the 
Mississippi river. 

The meeting will be under the auspices of the In- 
terstate Association, of which Mr. Irby C. Bennett, a 
popular and prominent Eastern sportsman, is Presi- 
dent. Elmer E. Shaner of Pittsburg, Pa., a gentle- 
man of notable experience in trap shooting lunctions 
and eseeemed by the Eastern shotgun fraternity for 
his genial personality and executive abilities will 
manage the shoot — and this selection argues a suc- 
cessfully conducted teap shoot that will be attended 
by 200 or more shooters. 

The programmed events for each day will bo open 
to amateurs only. About $1500 added money has al- 
ready been subscribed. The division of moneys will 
bo determined by the number of entries. The regular 
events, will probably, be 15 and 20 target races. The 
Preliminary Handicap will be at 100 targets as will 
the Pacific Coast Handicap. The handicaps will be 
in yards and arranged by a committee, appointed by 
President Bennett, composed of: M. J. Iverson, San 
Francisco; Guy Lovelace, Los Angeles; W. H. Varien, 
Pacific Grove; Maurlco Abrahams, Portland and W. 
H. McBroom, Spokane. 

The Preliminary Handicap trophy will be worth 
$50, the Pacific Coast Handicap trophy is valued at 
$100. The program is now with the printers and will 
probably be out and ready for distribution by the 
14th inst. 

Ingleside grounds will hi arranged to accommodate 
as largo a gathering of trap shooters as anticipated 
may attend. The Eastern representation will be a 
strong one, as will that from the Northwest, with a 
fair number from British Columbia. 

Five sets of traps will be put in at Ingleside, Includ- 
ing a straight bulkhead, and these will also be In 
readiness for tbo shooters. The regular events will 
be shot on the Sargeant system. Targets will cost 2J 
cents each and will be deducted from the purses. 

Arrangements have been made to have large and 
handsome electric cars ready for shooters each day at 
Market and Second streets. Cars will leave at 8, 8:30 
and 9 a. m.; returning at Intervals during the after- 
noon. Round trip tickets will be 25 cents. The trip of 
the shooters' cars to the grounds, or return, will take 
about 35 minutes. 

Sportsmen Intending to participate, we are in- 



10 



[August 5, 1905 



formed, can send, express prepaid, their guns and am- 
munition to either of the fol lowing sporting goods 
dealers— Clabrougb, Golcher& Co., 538 Market street; 
Shreve, Barber Co., 739 Market street or the Olympic 
Arms Co., 801 Market street— who will send their guns, 
etc., to the trap grounds, free of charge. 

This shoot, we feel assured will be one of the best 
ever arranged for, a gathering of Coast trap shooters 

The Santa Clara County Fish and Game Protective 
Association trap shots closed the club season with 
their final shoot last Sunday morning. Owing to the 
nearness of the deer and dove season, the attendance 
was somewhat small. The shoot was held on the 
association grounds, Odd Fellow tract, at the mouth 
of Alum Rock Canyon. 

Each entrant was privileged to shoot at 50 targets, 
Scores made at the eleven previous shoots wore not 
taken into consideration in the prize awards as the 
scorers had lost track of several shoots. The six 
prizes competed for were won by V. H. Owen, W. L. 
B. Cushing, J oa Delmas, E. Klein, E. Wastie and A. 
A. Brown. 

County Laws Knocked Out. 

According to a decision handed down by the Couit 
of Appeals July 29th, the sportsmen of Los Angeles 
county have won a sweeping victory over the county 
supervisors. The court has decided that all other 
laws than the State game laws are unconstitutional; 
in other words, that county supervisors have no right 
or authority to enact special laws to suit the local 
conditions, the State law being the only recognized 
law for every county of the State. Instead of having 
only one day for dove shooting, August 15th, accord- 
ing to an ordinance passed by the supervisors when 
the question of game laws came up for consideration 
several weeks ago, Los Angeles sportsmen will now be 
allowed to shoot doves from July 1st to February 15th. 
Ttie open season of last year was from July loth to 
October 1st. 

The decision was the result of the Los Angeles 
Supervisors passing an ordinance limiting dove shoot- 
ing to one day, August 15tb. A test case was made 
of the matter and taken into court with the result 
that sportsmen will now have the full season. 

The exact rights of County Supervisors In the 
matter of "monkeying" with the State game laws is 
now probably defined. 

Last month Lyman D. Prindle of Los Angeles was 
arrested by Game Warden Morgan in the San Fer- 
nando valley and charged with having violated the 
county game law by shooting doves in the closed 
season. The State law opened up sport July 1st. 
He was convicted by a Justice of the Peace. 

There has been much sentiment among southern 
sportsmen over the county game law changes, which 
have been characterized variously as ill-advised and 
unnecessary. As nearly every county in Southern 
California has a different set of laws, sportsmen are 
completely at sea, and in most cases cannot find out 
the law even by writing to the county officials, as a 
result of the frequent changes. 

Believing, therefore, that only evil could come of a 
continuance of these periodical county game law 
changes, and feeling: tliat the State has taken very 
good care of the game, the Los Angeles County Pro- 
tective Association instructed its attorneys to defend 
Mr. Prindle as a legal form for establishing and de- 
fining the rights of the Supervisors to pass game laws. 
Convicted, Mr. Prindle's case came up before the 
District Court of Appeals in due course of law, and by 
hab jis corpus proceedings it would have been brought 
to the immediate attention of the State Supreme 
Court, so that shooters m ght know their fate before 
the "sooners," of which there seems an abnormal 
crop, have killed off all the doves while the law- 
abiding sportsmen are sweltering in the city. 

The Prindle case affects every county in California. 
Theie has always been much doubt in good lawyers' 
minds as to the validity of the county ordinances if 
vigorously fought by competent legal talent, and the 
Prindle case will now probably establish their status 
beyond furtherquibble. 

The rather paradoxical spectacle of a game and fish 
protective association attacking a game law is ex- 
plained by the belief of most conservative protection- 
ists that incalculable harm has been done thecause by 
ill-advised and incompetent legislation, inflicting 
undeserved hardships on sportsmen in some sections, 
and placing a premium upon violations by keeping 
the law-abiding: ones home when the country is full of 
sporting material as at present. One good game law, 
and that enforced, is the slogan of the protectionists. 

Season Opens for Deer Hunters. 

The open season for hunting and killing bucks be* 
gan on Tuesday last. The outlook for a successful 
hunt in nearby hills was favorable, so far as the deer 
were concerned, for they were reported to be plentiful 
in Marin county. Weather conditions prevailed In 
that section, however, that were not conducive to 
sucoess. On Tuesday and Wednesday a heavy fog 
hung over the Marin hills, on Thursday it rained. 
The coast fog made hunting both difficult and 
dangerous. 

Results, however, were by no means nil. On the 
Country Club preserve Mr. Van Slcklen dropped a 
buok that scaled 115 pounds dressed. He got the 
deer on the run with a long shot. Andrew Jackson 
bagged a buck that weighed 150 pounds, one of the 
finest shot on the preserve for years. 

Sheriff Taylor two of his sons and three friends 
hunted over the Codonl, Cheda and Jewell ranches. 
They bagged a fine forked horn. The huut was 
brought to a close when the dogs refused to run by 
reason of the bad weather. A two pointer was killed 
on the Point Reyes Sportsmen's Club preserve.! 



The turnont in Marin county will be a large one 
today and tomorrow many of the different club mem- 
bers having postponed their hunt from the first until 

todav. 

The deer season in Mendocino county closes Septem- 
ber 15th. 

New A. K. C. Rules. 



of the Executive Comrrittee, by two thirds vote of the 
member present, or at any sDecial meeting on notice. 
Provided, however, that Sections 3 and 4 can only be 
altered or amended after notice of such alteration or 
amendment has been published in the Gazttte prior to 
being acted upon, and by a two-thirds vote of the 
members represented. 



On August 1st the following new A. K. O. rules and 
changes took effect and are now in force. They are 
of importance and in view of the coming Coast shows 
in the near future, we deem it of interest to the fancy 
to give them in this issue: 

VI. If a dog has been entered without being iden- 
tified, as directed in liults IV. and V., it Bball be dis- 
qualified and forfeit any prize which may be awarded 
to it. except in the case of technical errors where 
fraud is not shown, in which case the Secretary shall 
impose a fine of $2 for each entry. 

CLASSES. 

2. The novice class shall be for Americanbred dogs 
only, never having won a first prize at any recognized 
show, wins in the puppy classes excepted. 

5. The Winners' Class shall be open only to the 
winners of first prizes in any class at the show, giving 
at least three of the before-mentioned classes, one of 
which must be the Open Class Winners' Classes can 
not be allowed where two or more breeds are com- 
bined. The judge shall withhold the award of ''first" 
in this class should he be of the opinion that there is 
no dog of sufficient merit to justify such award, and 
the winner of ten points in this class, "under three 
different judges, excepting, however, at five-point 
shows, when two wins under different judges will be 
sufficient, " will thereby become a champion of record, 
be so registered by the American Kennel Club, and if 
registered in the Stud Book will be entitled to an 
American Kennel Club champion medal. Duplicate 
medals for champions cannot be issued. Before 
awarding "reserve" in this class, the dog or dogs 
having been placed second to the winner in any of 
the classes must be brought before the judge for com- 
petition with the remaining dogs in said Winners' 
Class. No class winner can be withd rawn or withheld 
from competition in the Winners' Class, and no entry 
fee shall be charged for said competition in this class. 
A dog that, prior to June 1, 1904, may have won in 
the Winners' Class under the ten-point rule shall 
qualify as a champion upon the completion of ten 
points. The Winners' Class can be divided by sex, 
provided the r«quired three classes announced in the 
premium list are also divided by sex. 

XXIV. The Superintendent of any show cannot 
exhibit or officiate as a judge at that show. 

NEW RULES AND CHANGES GOVERNING CLUUS 
HOLDING SHOWS. 

XVI. The Secretary of the American Kennel Club 
must enforce the following penalties for violations of 
the foregoing rules, the same to be reservtd from the 
deposit made with application for dates, after having 
satisfied himself that said violations were cue to the 
carelessness or negligence of the managers of the 
show: 

For accepting entries after the advertised date of 
the closing of entries— $5 for each entry. 

For accepting special or regular prizes from persons 
or clubs under suspension of disqualification— $5 

For accepting entries for puppy classes under six 
months of age, or without date of birth, breeder, sire 
or dam— $5 for each entry. 

For accepting entries signed with the agent's name 
only— $2 

For failure to file a copy of the premium list with 
the American Kennel Club as soon as published — $1 
for each day. 

For failure to file a marked catalogue with the 
American Kennel Club, certified to by the Secretary 
or Superintendent, and making a return of all listings 
and fees for same within seven days after the closing 
of the show — $1 for each day. 

For transferring a dog, as published in the catalo- 
gue, that has been wronglv entered by the exhibitor 
— $5. 

For all errors in the entry forms at shows where 
fraud is not shown— $2 for each entry. 

Section 5— Any person or persons acting in any 
official capacity, paid or unpaid, including that of 
Judge, Secretary, Superintendent, Steward, Clerk of 
a show or as an officer or member of a Bench Show 
Committee of any Club holding a show In the L'nited 
States of America, under any rules antagonistic to 
the American Kennel Club, shall be disqualified and 
debarred from all privileges of the American Kennel 
Club. 

Section 6 — With the exception of routine business, 
no matters shall be brought up for discussion at any 
meeting unless due notice has been given to the Secre- 
tary of the American Kennel Club and by him sent to 
each delegate at least twenty days prior to the said 
meeting or unless a majority of the delegates present 
at a meeting consent to the consideration of a new 
subject. 

Section 7 — That between the dates of December 1 
and December 31 of each year, nominations for the 
offices of President and Vice President and the Chair- 
man of each standing committee of this Association 
may be filed with the Secretary of this Association by 
any delegate whose club Is In good standing, and the 
said Secretary must publish said nominations for the 
above named offices in the January Issue of the 
American Kennel Qwette of each year. And at each 
succeeding annual meeting only such names as may 
have been nominated and whose nominations have 
been published In the preceding January issue of the 
American Kennel Gazette, In the manner above set 
forth, can be nominated and no other pomlnation 
shall be permitted nor can any candidates other than 
such as have been announced be nominated. 

Section 8 — These By-Laws may be altered, amended 
or suspended without notice, at any regular meeting 



DOINGS IN D0GD0M. 



STOCKTON SHOW. 

A three day show for the Stockton Kennel Club and 
the dates the club will apply for are October 19th, 
20th and 21st. It is safe to venture the statement 
that the Santa Cruz judge, Harry W. Lacv, we are 
told, will do most of the judging at Stockton. It is 
also within the possibilities that George A. Cranfield 
will judge Greyhuonds. Mr. Cranfield judged tbe 
breed at the S F. K. C show 1902, when there was 
about 150 entries— the largest class of Greyhounds 
ever shown on this side of the Atlantic. Further 
there is a strong sentiment to have one breed judged 
by a lady "who is regarded as one of the experts of 
the Coast" in the particular breed, Cockers it is 
rumored. 

The Stockton Club and the bench show proposition 
are getting along swiminglj. Letters have been re- 
ceived f-om mary fanciers outside of Stockton and 
San Joaquin county. Entries are promised frtm 
'Frisco, San Jose, Santa Cruz, Sacramento and other 
points. 

A drawback, but only a temporary one it is to be 
hoped, is the lack of a suitable building or ball in 
Stockton at present. This problem may be solved by 
showing the dogs in a tent or under a canvass covereb 
framework erected for the purpose. Whatever the 
difficulty for the preient, it is an assurance that the 
Stockton fanciers will overcome it in a satisfactory 
manner. 

George E. McLeod, who has done so much for the 
new club has resigned the club presidency. Absence 
from Stockton and urgent business affairs prompted a 
step that was not entertained favorably by the club 
members. Mr. F. N Vail wassele :ted to fill the office 
made vacant by Mr. McLeod Mr. Vail is an enthus- 
iastic fancier and a gentleman of strong- executive 
abilities and is well able to pilot the club into smooth 
sailing waters 

The list of specials will be a large one, many hand- 
some and valuable trophies having been already of- 
fered. The premium list is in the hands of the bench 
show committee and the prospect for a fine show at 
Stockton in October, we are pleased to state, is a most 
propitious one. 

'FRISCO SHOW CANCELLATIONS 

The perusal of the following cancellations will 
demonstrate to the fancy the importance of ad hcriog 
strictly to the new rules and changes. Technical 
errors and carelessness in making out entries are 
mainly responsible for the loss of wins at the May 
show. 

The following awards have been cancelled and the 
following dogs moved up: 

Class 15, Great Danes, Nero, not eligible, 1st limit, 
San Francisco, 1902; Rex takes 2d, Rex II, 3d. 

Class 16 and 17, Great Danes, Ruy Bias, registered 
Cunningham's Ruy Bias. 

Class 16, Nero takes 1st, Rex 2d. 

Class 17, Nero takes 1st, Rex 2d. 

Class 18. Prince F. takes 1st. 

Classes 41, 42. 43. 44 and 47, Pointers, Oyama, Com- 
bination Boy, Cuba Jr and Stella entered in unregit- 
tered kennel name. 

Class 41, Tick takes 1st, Dick A. 2d. 

Class 43, Dictator takes 2d. 

Class 47, Topsy II takes 1st, Sally Ewlng 2d, Bee 3d. 

Classes 65 and 66, Irish Setters, Mike Swiveller 
registered as Mike Swiveller T. ; Toronto Pat takes 1st. 

Class 103, Cocker Spaniels, Sosoma Girl, not eligible, 
1st novice. San Francisco, 1904; Ramona takes 1st, Vi 
2d, Buff Beauty 3d. 

Class 110, Cocker Spaniels, Lansdown Ada H., not 
eligible, 4 limits; Little Maid takes 1st. 

Class 123, Collies, Astrologer Grace, registered 
Ellwyn Astrologer Grace. 

Classes 143, 144 and 145, Bulldogs, Eva, particulars 
not given; Queen II takes 3d. 

Class 148, Bull Terriers, Edgecote Baron, registered 
number not given; Rex takes 1st, Edgecote Al 2d, 
Jasper 3d. 

Classes 170 and 173, Boston Terriers, Glenwood 
Nancy, wrong p digree. 
Class 170, Cricket takes 1st. 

Class 190, Fox Terriers, Norfolk Huntsman, not 
eligible, 4 limits; Tallac Chuck takes 1st. 

Class 127, Irish Terriers, Edgecote Madge, not 
eligible, 1st novice, Seattle; Tyrone Lass takes 1st. 



KNOLISH SETTER KENNELS. 

The Grangers' Inn Kennels has been established at 
Crockett by John M. Golobeck and Wm. Phillips. 
Mr. Golobeck Is the owner of that sterling good bench 
show and field Setter Ch. Cato, Jr., and his handsome 
winning son Cato's Judge, both dogs are not un- 
familiar to the Setter fancy. The new kennels have 
been reinforced with several stylish and high class 
brood bitches, It is the purpose of the owners to 
breed and break high class dogs. Mr. Phillips is a 
thorough and competent trainer and has wonderful 
command over young dogs. We recommend tbe 
Grangers' Inn Kennels to the attention of sportsmen 
who desire well bred and properly broken field dogs. 



W. W. Smlth'B Bull Terrier bitch Alameda (New. 
market Duke-Edgewood Jean) whelped eleven pup- 
pies (7 dogs), July 29tb, to J. I. Sparrow's Croydon 
Czar (Woodcote Bersac-Brassle). 

J. I. Sparrow's Sllkwood Daisy Belle (Newmarket 
Duke II. -Woodcote Venus) whelped seven puppies (4 
dogs), July 17th, to Croydon Czar. 



AUGUST 5, 1905J 



11 



TRADE NOTES. 



AVERAGES REPORTED. 

Eufaula. Ala., July 11th and 12th, Walter HulT. of 
Macon, Ga., first general average, 375 out of 400, 
snooting 'DuPont." Harry N. Hall, second general 
average, 371 out of 400, shootiug "DuPont." J.N. 
Hightower, third general average, 364 out of 400, 
shooting '-DuPont." H. S. McClesky, of Amencus, 
Ga , and E J. Joaes, of Eufaula, Ala ., ties for drat 
amateur average, 351 out of 400, shooting '•DuPont." 
Gray Vaughn, of Selma, Ala , second amateur aver .ge, 
344 out of 401), shooting 'DuPont " J. W. Huff, of 
WalJen, Ga , third amateur average, 340 out of 400, 
Shooting - DuPont." 

Betterton, Ma., July 12, 13. 14, E. H. Storr, first 
general average, 480 out of 500, shooting "Du Pont 
L S. German, of Aberdeen. Md., first amateur and 
second general average, 4156 out of 5u0, shooting 
'•DuPont " J- Mowell HawKlus, third general aver- 
age, 463 out of 500 sho.ting --DuPont " W. M. 
Foord.of Wilmington, Del .second amalt ur average, 
458 out of 500. shooting "DuPont " 

Manning, Iowa, July 14tb, H. G Taylor, of Meck- 
ling, S. I)., ttrot general and first amateur averages, 
301 out of 400, sbooiirg "New E. C." (Improved) K 
K. Barber, of Paulliuc Iowa, second general and 
second amateur averages. 386 out of 400, shooing 
"DuPoat." Russell Klein, o! Spirit Lake, la., third 
amateur average, 370 out of 400, shooting - DuPont " 
Menominee. Mich , July 12ih and 13-,b, W. R. 
Crosby, shooting "New E C "(Improved) and H. C. 
Hirschy, shooiiug "Du Pont," first general average, 
3'Jl out of 400. C. Youog, second geueral average, 387 
out of 400, shooting "Du Pont." R )lla Heik. s, third 
gener»l average, 386 out of 400, shooting, "Du Pont.' 
G. Deringof Columbus, Wis., first amateur average, 
380 out of 400, shooting "Scbulize.'-' W. H Schultze 
..f Toma, Wis., second smateur average, 374 out of 
400, shooting ' Du Pont." A. Molle of Anligo, Wis., 
third amateur average. 371 out of 400, snooting ' In- 
fallible." H. C. Hirschy. shooting "Du Pont" had 
th- lone run of the to-> rnament. 159 sttaight. 

Milwaukee, Wis.. July 10. h. C. W. BuJd, first 
general Hverage. 186 out of 195, shooting 'New 
SnhullZ)." Fi. C. Hirschv, second general average, 
181 out of 195. shooting "Du Pont " W D Standard 
third general average, 182 out of 195, shooiirg "Du 
Pont " F. Kaufman of Two Pivers, Wis , first amateur 
averoge, 155 out of 170, shooiing "Du Pont." I._Hal- 
veroon of EUo, Wis , second amateur average, 147 out 
of 170, shooiirg "Du Pont." Fred Wolf (.Capt. Jack) 
of M lwauker, third amateur average. 146 out of 170, 
shooting "Du Pont" and "Infallible." The pro- 
fessionals shot at 195, but the amateurs at 170, it 
being very late before tbev finished. 

At Millwood Gun Club shoot Mill ValUy, July 30nb, 
R. Van Norden 50 straight; won cup race; won miss 
and out, 31 straight, won freeze-out 9 straight, won 
. sealed condition race, 18 and tie, 10 straight and won 
shoot-off, using "New E. C." 



PETERS' POINTS. 

At Lonaconing, Md., July 4th and 5th, Mr. R S. 
Deniker of Ruffsdale, Pa., took first average, and Mr. 
Warren Smith of Osterburg, Pa., secoud average, 
both using Peters' Ideal factory loaded shells. 

At Fort Worth, Texas, July 12th, 13th and 14th tho 
ma jority of the 55 contestants including tho winners 
of second and third professional averages, and second 
amateur average, used Peters' Loaded Shells. The 
Ithaca gun was won by Otto Sens, who broke 25 
sttaight with Peters' Ideals. Tr>o Mitchell gold medal 
was won by M. E. Atchison, of Giddiogs, Texas, with 
a score ot 50 straight. Mr. Atchison tied with three 
others on 25 straight, then shot 25 in the shoot-off, 
u-ing Ideals. He also made a run of 112 straight on 
the last day of the tonmament, 

At Betterton, Md , July 12th, 13th and 14tb, E. H. 
Storr, using Peters' Target Shells, won high average, 
breaking 480 out of 5(K) with a sliding handicap Mr. 
Storr made a run of 97 straight, 89 from 20 yards and 
8 from 19 yards At Cambridge, Md .July 7th, Mr. 
Storr was high average losing only 3 targets out of 
165. Peters' Target shells are well named, for they 
certainly do smash tht m up. 

Mr. C. A. Young, representing the Peters' Cart- 
ridge Co , won high avora>;e in tho shoot at Degraff, 
Ohio, July 20th, losing only !ii out of 275 targets. 
Mr. C. A. Young also won high average at Dayton, 
Ohio, July 221, 97%, using Peters' Ideal shells. 

High average at Decatur, Ills , shoot, J uly 18th and 
19th, was won by H. W. Cadwa'lader, the Peters' 
Cartridge Company's representative; average 96%. 

On Ju'y 21->t, Mr. John M. Pemberton of Ashvaie, 
Ark., holder of the Arkansas Flying Target Cham- 
pionship, successfully defended his title against Mr. 
S M. Piwell, of Little Rock, scoring 45 out of 50. 
Both contestants used Peters Premier shells. 

GOOO TEAM WOKK. 

In a recent trip made by Fred Gilbert and C. W. 
Pnellis, shooting as a team, the following scores were 
uiido with the Parker gun: 

GILBERT PBELT.IS. 

July 9-Grand Rapids 8S7 out of 250 2S9 out of 950 

July II— Ml. Clemens 147 " •• 150 HI " " ISO 

July U-Djt'oit (Winchester Gun 

Ulub) H7 '• " 150 145 " " 150 

July 15-Detrolt (Grove Gun piub) fc8 " " 100 97 " " iuo 
July 16— Detroit (Lakeside Gun Clb) 97 " "100 94 " "100 

728 '• " 716 716 " " 7.i0 
General averages— Gilb3rt 96 k%, Phellis 95.4%. 

At the Woodmere Gun Club tournament, held at 
Woodmere, Mich., July J9th, C. W Phellis won first 
average, with a score of 185 out of 200, at 20 yards 
In this same shoot Mr. Phellis also made a score of 20 
straight at 20 yards, winning a $25 stein, for the only 
open event, at 20 targets. 

At a t-Mit-nament held at Richmond, Va , July 4th, 
W. L. Bjyd, shooting the Parker gun, won the ama- 
teur championship of Virginia, with a score of 98 out 
of 100. having made 77 straight. 



All of this Is excellent shooting and speaks volt mes 
for the "Old Reliable" Parker gt n. 

A CONVINCING TESTIMONIAL, 

The Ithaca Gun Company receives many communi- 
cations from sportsmen who speak highly of the 
Ithaca gun. Here is a sample: 

I beg to thank yon for tne beautiful and effective 
gun which you so kindly built to my particular speci- 
fications; it is indeed a triumph of the art of modern 
gun making. Have owned guns made by the best 
gun makers of the world which cost much more, but 
have never had one to suit me so well, and have yet 
to see a gun I would exchange H for 

W. B. MOORE, M. D., Kentville, N. S. 

POWDERS AND TUE~ O A. H. 

Brooklyn, N. Y., July 21. 
Editor Forest and Stream:— 1 have teen nadiDg tie 
powder advertisements in this wnk's Forut arid 
Stream, and am somewhat at tea. My perplexity is 
caused by conflicting claims of powder perfotmances 
at tht; Grand American Handicap. I don't tee how 
different powders could have won the same pi izes as 
claimed , unless the pi ize winning shooters alte mated 
their powders and used first one and then another in 
their shooting, or else mixed differ ent powders when 
they loaded their shells This I* something I never 
knew a shooter to do willingly in shooiing a match of 
any sort, and certainly I shoulu not think it would 
have been done in a contest of such importance as the 
Grand American. At the same time I confess to a 
curiosity to know how we are to harmonize the con- 
flicting statements about the records of the several 
powders. Are there any official records to throw 
light on this? William Applegate. 

[The matter of the winnings relatively of the 
Du Pont and Ballistite powders at the recent Grand 
American Handicap, June 27-30, has been called 
earnestly to our attention, particulaily by the letter 
above. We have examined the Interstate Association 
ofHcial records of powders, guns, etc., pertiining to the 
point in questior, and from th«m we extract ibr fol- 
lowing statistical information: InlheGratd Ameri- 
can Handicap there were 73 men in the money , Instead 
of 61, as has bjen represented. Of the 73 winners 40, 
used Du Pont powder, or nearly 55 per cent of the 
winner s, and their total winnings were $1710 50, or 
over 53 per cent of the purse, $3200.20. Of the "3 
winners, 13 used Ballistite, or nearly 18 percent, and 
they won a total of $619 95 out of the purse of $3200 20, 
or a fr action over 19 per cent. Du Pont powder won 
the Preliminary Handicap, the Grand American 
Handicap the Consolation Handicap and the five-man 
State championship, thus winning all the trophies. 
There is no such thing as a "prize" officially known 
in the Grand American Handicap at Targets. There 
are purses, money and trophies only Of the total of 
184 winners in tbmo handicap events, Du Pont had 
about 100 and Ballistite had 26 The official records 
of the Interstate Association are the only authorita- 
tive records on uhis subject.] — Forest and Stream. 




THE FARM. 




Farm Boy Has Best Chance. 

Boys who ate growing tip on a farm are , 
very much given to envying the city boy j 
the better chance that he is supposed to 
have for getting on in the world. 

We have some evidence that such is not 
the ca e. We quote now from the 
American Farmer an editorial explaining 
the reasons and the conditions that give 
the farmer boy the best chance. 

Indiana State Superintendent of Public 
Instruction, Fassett A. Cotton, addressing I 
a gathering of teachers, recently, made | 
the following sensible and well timed , 
remarks : 

'■It is just in his ability to do things' 
that the boy on the farm has a better 
chance to succeed than the town or city 
bred boy. And it is because the boy on 
the farm has work to do." 

"The country boy is well (rained in the 1 
expressive side of life. It is expression, 
too, that amounts to some thine and in it 
he gets the notion there is work to do in 
the world, that life is not all play. Now, 
if you can use these good qualities in your 
school work, well and good. And if you 
can use them, in building in the com- 
munity a larger regard for labor and a 
supreme respect for the farm and its 
problems that will keep the boys in the 
country, it will be all the better for the 
boys and the nation in tbe years to come. 

"Of courie, if a young man really 
believe*, that be will have better op- 
portunities for himself and for what he 
would do for humanity by going to tbe 
oitv.be should go. He can succeed, as 
scores who have preceded him are succeed- 
ing. But let him remember that farm 
work is as important, just as honorable, 
just as clean, that it requires just as much 



ability anil that it is just as remunerative 
aB my work he will find to do." 

The forcible point made that the farm 
boy has a better chance of success than 
the city bred youth, because of his ability 
to do things, is worth pondering over. 
"The boy on the farm has work to do," 
says Mr. Cotton, and he might have 
ad led that on the faun the boy is taught 
to respect labor. Too often the city boy 
is permitted to grow up into habits of 
indolence, if not of vice, having little 
regard for or knowledge of labor upon 
which he looks with a sort of disdain. 
Laboring not, he is incapable of taking a 
place among those who are fo bear of I' the 
prizes of the earth. Neither is hecapable 
of fully appreciating the joys of life, be- 
cause of a surfeit of pleasure. He is, of 
all persons, most unhappy. Compare his 
state with that of the farm boy who 
labors and has his wholesome joys. His 
is a healthy boJy, his woik is the noblest 
of all callings, and to his recreation he 
adds a knowledge that it has been earned. 
Self respect is the leal secret of his joys. 
He eats no other's bread but his own, 
paid for by his own brawn, by his own 
sweit sweetened. He may look about 
him and reflect that knowing the pur- 
chasing power of honest labor, his may 
he the conquest of large things. Ambi- 
tion is kindled, he enlarges his si, here, 
the world opens up before him and 
behold, soon, the boy becomes now the 
busy, successful man of action. Remem- 
ber, boys, sinca the dawn of time the 
field of agriculture has ever been the 
cradle of the greatest men. How pleased 
you should be that it bred and nutured 
y u . — Exchan g e, ^ 

Some of the best money-making farmers 
who have been in the business many 
years and are conceded to be successful 
by their neighbors, feed but very little to 
hogs or other stock on their farms besides 
that which they grow upon the farm. 
o 

To have your cows milk long, milk 
them clean. 



The Missouri Mule. 



A mule from Chulu brought $150 on 
the St. Louis market a few months ago, 
says the Chulu, Mo., News. This mu'e 
from Chulu has as many ancestors as 
anybody, but from now on, as far as he 
is concerned, there is a full stop; the lid 
is on, as Mr. Folk would say, nothing 
doing Of course, everybody knows that 
Missouri leads the world on mules, and 
Chulu town leads Missouri — that's why 
we talk. A mule colt will bring from 
$75 to $90 on the streets of Chulu, about 
$1 a pound. They are seldom offered for 
sale, however, as a mule was never 
known to get old or sick. A mule is 
always worth his fi ve year-old price. He 
can always do anything he could ever 
do. At 35 he looks the same, acts the 
same, is the same and matches his fi ve- 
year-old platonic thirty-second, twice 
removed accidental, half grandniece. 

His noble ears and mealy nose, 

His glistening coat and polished toes, 

Ills Hoe straight logs and ribs of steel. 

Ills muscles tense as when you feel 

A monster warship's Iron keel. 

His tendons of tbe strength It brings 

To twist a million catgut strings, 

Ho drags tbe battle coglnos forth 

And proud to provo on field his worth, 

He dies like one cf noble birth, 

A faith portrayed in form and face, 

To dlvoron mountains from Iholr base, 

He dies at last a giant king 

Of all the creatures earth can bring, 

And loaves no child his pralso to sing. 



It don't pay to keep cows for a side 
issue. Get tbe best and make dairying 
a business just like any branch of farm 
work. 

o 

When the butterstlcks to the worker, 
the latter was not soaled properly. Rub 
It with salt and scald again. 

Uneven salting and working makes 
streaky butter. 

o 

Keep the farm separator clean, Inside 
and outside. 



With milk as a starter, pigs soon lea' n 
to eat slops made of mill feed. 



The beds or sheds for young pijg 
should always be arranged so tie pigs 
can havo the full benefit of the sun's 
rays. 



Tho health of the ho? depends very 
largely on what is taken Into the system 
through the nose and mouth. 



Nothing tends to the thrift of a pig 
so much as to have him relish his feed at 
all times. 

o 

The pig multiplies so fast that under 
favorable eircumstanci s a shortppe can- 
not be depended upon for a very long 
time to keep up the price. 



Sale, 



Itrooil Mares. Morses In Training and Year- 
lings, Belonging to lire Estate of 
HtOhae)] B*OJC, Deceased. 

\ T OTICE IS HEUE1IY GIVEN THAT THE 
- N undersigned executor of the will of Michael 
Vox, deceased, will soli on or after MONDAY, 
AUGUST i!8, 1905, the following described brood 
mares, horses lu training and yearlings, to wit: 
AikIIiimh (4) by St. Andrew-Fanny Louise. 
Manedo (I) by Maxlo-Keiecla II. 
K« Carlo (2) by St Carlo-Keseda II 
Edna Rose (A) by Kassetla w-Keseda II 
Kldiiu pper ( 1 ) by Kenll\vor(h-p:dna Koto, 

Tbe above described animals are now at the 
Oakland Race Track. 

Said executor will also sell on or after said 
date the following brood mares and fillies, now at 
MoDonougb's Hunch. San Mateo County, Cat.: 
Fanny I.ouiie (dam of Andrlia, Cinmoro, Sister 

Jeannle) by Dareblo-Nellle Peyton. 
Reseda II by Midlothian-Marigold. 
One Hay Filly by Orslnl out of Fanny Louleo, 

foaled A prll 13. 1004 
One Hay Filly by Orslnl out of Fanny Loulie, 

foaled April SI. 1905. 
Una chMinut Filly by St. Carlo out of Hctioda 
II, foaled January 24, 1905. 

Finny Loulie was bred to St Cirlo, 1905. 

Reseda II wn bred to Orslnl, 1905. 

Bids or offer* for all of the above denorlbed 
stock, as a whole or separately, must be In writ- 
Ing and will bi received any time after the first 
publication of this notice at tbe orrloe of Sullivan 
A Sullivan, attorneys for said exeoutor, Room 
810, Parrott B inding. San Franolsco, California. 

Terms— Cash In U. S. gold coin. 

MATTHEW I. SULLIVAN, 
Executor of the Will of Mlohael Fox, Deoeased, 



12 



[August 5, 1905 



Common Goat is Sold as Lamb and 
Mutton. 



Goat, says the Department of Agricul- 
ture, in a bulletin recently issued— goat, 
common garden goat, supplies a consid- 
erable part of the "lamb" and "mutton" 
handled by the great packing houses and 
sold by the wholesalers and retailers all 
over the country. Expert Thompson, 
who has conducted the goat investigation, 
reflects as follows in his report upon goat 
as a table delicacy : 

It is generally agreed upon by those 
who speak from experience that the kids 
of all breeds of goats are a table delicacy. 
It is true that among the great masses of 
the people of this country there is a re- 
markable and well-grounded prejudice 
againBt anything bearing the name of 
goat. 

Within the environments of the larger 
cities are found many kids, and it is evi- 
dent that only a few of them ever grow 
to muturity. What heconies of the rest? 
Butchers and meat dealers answer this 
question by saying that they are sold as 
lamb. No meat denier has ever heard a 
complaint against the quality of such 
lamb. 

A considerable number of middle-aged 
and old mongrel goats are purchased by 
the packing-houses of the large cities. 
They are purchased as goat, but are sold 
as mutton, and many of those who so 
strenuously condemn goat have eaten it 
a score of times. 

Mr. Thompson adds that the elderly 
goat is not as good as good mutton, hut 
that it is not any worse than bad mutton. 
He insists that the prejudice against it 
would disappear if people would only 
make a test and eat goat as goat instead 
of as lamb. He is not very hopeful, how- 
ever, of such a result. He started upon 
his goat leport with the purpose of 
answering the numerous inquiries which 
have reached the bureau as to the possi- 
bility of creating a goat industry in the 
United States. It was while incidentally 
remarking upon the present size of the 
industry that he made the startling state- 
ments which confound our morning lamb 
with goat chops. 

Mr. Thompson says that the inquiries 
as to the possible creation of a new in- 
dustry in the United States came princi- 
pally from persons with considerable 
capital, a good deal of worthless land and 
plenty of time to think. He believes 
that when these people learn that the 
United States imports 820,000,COO worth 
of goat skins annually and that conditions 
in this country are extremely favorable 
for goat-raising, they will surely sit up 
and take notice. 

The bulletin devotes considerable space 
to explaining that the term "common 
goat" does not indicate any special breed 
and is not meant to be contemptuous, but 
that it covers all sorts of mongrel goats, 
without regard to size, c nfirmation, color 
or character. According to Mr. Thomp- 
son there are about 2,000,000 goats in the 
United States, 700,000 of which can recog- 
nize their parents. New York has 1316 
within its borders, as compared with 700,- 
000 for Texas. Rhode Island can boast 
of only 23. They are all common goats, 
but '2.2 of them Mr. Thompson says, have 
risen in the social scale and now furnish 
the motive power for a similar number of 
go-carts. The twenty-third has a bad 
reputation. 

Mr. Thompson further reports that after 
an exhaustive study he is able to say that 
a common goat can eat as many different 
.thinge within a given space of time as an 
Angora goat, and that it is certainly 
foolish to employ a force of men to clear a 
tract of land at a cost of from $5 to $40 
an acre when a goat will do it for nothing 
and be glad of the chance. In regard to 
breeding, the Angora is given to triplets, 
while the common goat sticks to twins. 
The twins usually arrive a good deal 
oftener, however, and consequently the 
more common kids than the Angora or 
other registered stock enter the lamb and 
mutton markets every year. 



Correct Way of Milking. 



It would be better for the reputatian of 
dairymen could the milkers be induced 
to milk with clean bands, declares H. 
O. Curtis in writing to the Jersey Bui- 
kt'in. Sour and tainted milk is too com- 
mon with us during the summer and 
autumn months, and it is a difficult task, 
under the most favorable conditions, to 
have the milk free from taint. Not only 
has the dairyman to combat taints from 
feeds in the fall, but the cows will get 
dirt on their udders and teats, and from 
these it gets into the milk pail because 
most men milk with wet hands. What- 
ever the milker has been handling before 
milking leaves a taint and bacteria on 
the hands, and, of course, it is washed off 
into the milk ; the result is that one day's 
cream, or one day's churning, is different 
in bouquet and flavor from another. 

The buttermaker will tell us be con- 
trols the flavor with another kind of bac- 
teria, but there is something more potent 
than the buttermaker's special specie9 of 
butter culture, and it is what gets into 
tbe nrlk ahead of the man at the churn. 
As already stated, it is the dirt on the 
cow's udder that is causing a riot among 
the different kinds of living organisms in 
the milk. When a scientific buttermaker 
gets on his ear about some taint that is 
puzzling him he makes a fermentation 
test and locates it nine times out of ten, 
but that iB no reason whv carelessness 
should be practiced all the time in milk- 
ing. The consumer of milk in the city 
gets hold of some of this tainted and 
impure milk, and he blames the dairy 
from which it came. The city man does 
not care one iota whether the milk came 
from John, Jacob or Isaac, so long as it is 
good and rich. Eut, what is "good and 
rich" milk? There is going to be a dif- 
ferent definition as to what is "good" for 
the human family and what is not good, 
according to some modern medical authori- 
ties. 

But, whatever that may amount to, it 
is not what we want. The crying need is 
plenty o! clean, wholesome milk, and it 
cannot be had unless milkers milk with 
dry hands. 

Poor Fowls Do Not Pay. 

It does not pay to keep mongrel fowls. 
No one can afford to keep puor fowls 
when there are better ones to be had. 
The business in co9t is a mere bagatelle 
when compared with the profits during 
the season. Some barnyard fowls are all 
right, but they are sadly in the minority. 

One reason v by the thoroughbreds pay 
so much better is that they are uniform. 
Their habits are similar and a flock may 
be treated more as a unit. To get the 
most from fowls it is necessary to study 
their individuality. This cannot he done 
with mongrels because each one is dif- 
ferent, but it can be done easily in a 
collective manner with thoroughbred 
fowls" because they feed alike and their 
habits are much in the same families, 
but the difference is along certain pre- 
scribed lines and easily adjusted. 

There are three general classes of fowls. 
Asiatics are especially valuable for meat, 
they correspond with beef breeds of cattle 
for beef. For eggs the Mediterraneans are 
especially valuable for they have been 
bred along lines of production in this 
especial class, until their capacity for 
converting food into eggs is almost mar- 
velous. 

The American fowls fit in between the 
Mediterranean and Asiatics. The Ameri- 
can breeds are good layers and they are 
all large enough to furnish suitable meat 
for the table. They are active in summer 
time and for this reason are classed among 
the most valuable fowle for the farm. 
They may be termed general purpose 
fowls and classed very much as general 
pui poBe cows. Under certain conditions 
they are more valuable than especial 
breedB that require careful 'ooking after 
to develop their greatest production along 
prescribed lines. 

For farmers' use probably one of the 



American breeds of solid color gives the 
best general satisfaction. That is, on nine 
farms out of ten a good medium white 
hen will forage for herself and lay more 
eggs than a carefully bred laying strain. 
This does not necessarily mean that a 
thoroughbred American fowl will do well 
under a system of neglect, but she will 
give good results with lees care than 
some of the great layers or great meat 
producers. 

The Leghorns cannot be classed as 
general purpose fowls, because they do 
not hatch their own eggs. A general 
purpose fowl must be good for everything 
that is required of the hen. She must 
lay agoodly number of eggs, take on flesh 
when wanted for the proper season. In 
addition to this they are valuable when 
the motherly instinct prompts them to 
take good care of the small fry. — Stockman 
Journal. 

Regulations for Shipping Live Stock. 

Washington, July 28— Regulations for 
the shipment of live stock under the 
twenty-eight-hour law in the matter of 
feed and rest of stock in transit were com- 
pleted today by the Department of Agri- 
culture. The recommendations as to the 
department's attitude on the question 
were prepared by Dr. D. E. Salmon, chief 
of the Bureau of Animal Industry, and 
approved by Sectetary Wilson, are as 
follows : 

"The statute provides for the shipment 
of live stock without unloading en-roate 
under certain conditions. I have in- 
vestigated the subject and would re- 
spectfully recommend that the depart- 
ment approve as being in compliance 
with the statute all shipments of cattle 
in transit for more than twenty-eight 
consecutive hours made under the follow- 
ing conditions : 

"First, that the cars containing the 
cattle shall be equipped with hay racks, 
each lineal foot of which shall have a 
capacity of not less than one cubic foot 
extending along the sides of the cars from 
the doors to the end, and that the cars 
shall be so arranged that the racks may be 
readily filled with hay through openings 
in the car roof. 

"Second, that the cars shall be fitted 
with semi-cylindrical watering troughs of 
galvanized iron not less than fifteen 
inches deep by not less than twelve inches 
wide across the top, inside measurement, 
with the inner edge curved to retain the 
water and facilitate filling. The trough 
is to be placed in proper position along 
the side of the errs and extend from the 
doors to the end. All troughs are to be 
so arranged that they can be readily filled 
with water and emptied on the outside of 
the car, and the troughs be kept free from 
all litter and filth. 

"Third, food and water to be supplied 
at intervals not exceeding twenty-eight 
hours, while the shipments are in transit, 
and in supplying water each car to be 
stopped for at least five minutes, during 
which time the troughs shall be kept 
filled with clear water, and all animals 
given an opportunity to drink. 

"Fourth, in order that the cattle may 
have sufficient Bpace and opportunity to 
rest the cars shall not be overloaded, and 
in all shipments there Bhall be room in 
each car for at least one-third of the cattle 
to lie down at the same time. The num- 
ber of head of cattle that may be carried 
in a thirty-six-foot car ia shown in the 
following table, according to the live 
weight: 

Average live weight and head for thirty- 
six-foot car respectively: 700, 23; 800, 22; 
900, 21 ; 1000, 20 ; 1100, 10 ; 1200, 18 : 1300, 
17; 1400, 16; 1500, 16; 1600, 14; 1700, 13; 
1800, 12. _ 

What Prime Butchers Are. 



must show marked evidence of ripeness 
and maturity. The two must go hand in 
hand. A hog may be mature without 
having being fed so as to show that bloom 
of condition that is necessary for a prime 
hog, or he may have been fed as well as 
possible and not be sufficiently mature. 
Maturity may be reached at different ages 
and weights. 

The quality of a prime hog is indicated 
by a medium size, fine, clean cut head, 
without surplus fat or wrinkles of shin, 
medium sized ears of fine texture, hair 
that is fine, straight, silky, and lies close 
to body. Skin smooth, pliable and free 
from wrinkles. Smooth, nicely tapering 
tail, medium size. No undue coarseness 
at joints. The form should be broad 
across the back, wide and well filled hams 
and shoulders, short, heavy neck, heavy 
jowls and short legs. He must be sym- 
metrical, smooth and compact. 

He must be well covered with a thick 
layer of fat on the outside of the carcass, 
be well rounded out at the rump, thus 
making a socket in which the tail is set, 
be well filled out on the neck up to the 
face, have a broad, fat hack, with much 
fat on sides and belly and be well filled in 
flanks and twist. He must, however, be 
free from flahbiness. 



Breed to the Right Stallion. 

Horses and mules of the right sort are 
bringing paying prices on the markets. 
The undersized, scrubby ones bring the 
bottom prices. Many farmers are dis- 
gusted with raising horses because they 
unfortunately pay little attention to 
breed or conformation of sire or dam, 
and the result is disappointment in nine 
cases out of ten. There has never been 
a much better demand for good shaped, 
active, fair-sized horsss and mules. 
Breed the right sort and then let the 
colts have all the grain and bright hay 
they will eat up clean. Do not stint 
them. There is a great future for the 
judicious horse and mule breeder. 



We hear a great deal now about breed 
type and characteristics, and it is right 
that breeders should pay attention to 
these things. But first and foremost the 
form and function that produces the most 
profit must be observed. We have seen 
breeders, in looking over pure bred 
animate — hoga for instance— when they 
would evidently entirely ignore a broad 
back, well-filled hams, good length of 
body and strong, clean bone, and talk 
long and loud against the animal because 
one hind foot was black when they would 
rather have had it white to conform to 
the ideal marking We agree that for a 
pure bred animal it would haye been a 
good thing to have had it just right, but 
of the two— a white foot or a profitable 
meat making form— we would certainly 
have greater admiration for the form. 
Usefulness must be the first requirement. 



The term "prime'' in a general way 
means the best of the class, but in a 
more specific way in stockyards vernacu- 
lar it has a meaning of its own. says 
William Dietrich of the Illinois Experi- 
ment Station. To grade as prime a hog 



Warranted to Give Satisfaction. 

GombauH's 

Caustic Balsam 




Has Imitators But No Competitors. 

A Safe, Speedy and Positive Cure for 
Curb, Splint. Sweeny, Capped Hock, 
Strained Tendons, Founder, Wind 
tuts.', and all lameness from Spavin, 
Ringbone and other bony tumors. 
Cures all skin diseases or Parasites, 
Thrush, Diphtheri". Removes ail 
Bunches from Horseo or Cattle, 
As a Human Remedy for Rheumatism, 
Sprains, Sore Throat, etc.. It Is Invaluable. 

l.v, i v bottle or Caustie Balsam sold Is 
Warranted to (rive satisfaction. J'rlce $1 60 
per bottle. Sold by druciri^W, or sent by ex- 
press, charges paid, witn full directions for 
its u«e twsend for descriptive jirculaxs, 
testimonials, etc. Address 

The Lawrence-Williams Co., Cleveland. 



August 5, 1905] 



13 



Choosing a Breed. 



One of the most difficult questions to 
decide in the commencement of poultry 
keeping is the selection of a breed from 
which the best results can be obtained, 

says American Poultry Advocate. Many 
a beginner has spent money, labor and 
time trying different breeds before the 
one has been found that was beet adapted 
to his situation and requirements. 

It is known that certain breeds have 
qualities peculiar to themselves, as for 
instance Wyandottes excel as broilere ; 
Leghorns as egg producers; Brahmas in 
liesh and weight ; white Plymouth Rocks 
approach nearest to the best all purpose 
fowls, and so on. Besides this, however, 
it would appear that every man or woman 
who has a liking for poultry keeping has 
some one breed with which they would be 
more successful than with any other. 
They seem to understand this breed 
better, push it to the beet advantage and 
from it obtain the best results. Even 
when two or more breeds are kept, one 
will usually be the favorite. There i 
ittle doubt that the poultry keepers who 
are making the most, and are the most 
successful are the ones that are specialists 
with one particular breed. 

While the situation of the place on 
which poultry is to be kept should never 
be lost sight of by the beginner, its 
adaptability to certain requirements as 
to whether eggs, broilers or market 
poultry would bring the best results, still 
after all it is in perfecting a breed that 
the most money is made in the end, and 
therefore the ta6te and liking of a beginner 
in mating a choice of a breed should play 
an important part. 

In perfecting a breed and in its right 
care, handling and management so that 
stock and eggs can be sold to other 
fanciers, one is not brought into active 
competition with every farmer or keeper 
of a few hens, as is the case in the sale 
of eggs or market poultry. Therefore in 
the lines of this special endeavor better 
results can be obtained. 

It would seem then that after the special 
requirements of the situation are taken 
into consideration, it would be best to 
choose that breed which one likes the 
best or those that approach nearest to 
these requirements. 



WESTCHESTER RACING ASSOCIATION 

Under the Auspices of The Jockey Club and National Steeplechase and Hunt Association 



Race Course. Belmont Park 
Queens. Long Island, n. y. 



Office, 571 Fifth Ave., New York 

"THEWl • DSOR ARCADE" 



1906 1907 1908 

SPECIAL NOTICE TO OWNERS AND TRAINERS 

The Bxed events tor now yearlings, to run when two years old In 1906, when three years old In 
1907, and for foals of 1935 to run in 1908 will be duly announced to olose September 15, 190.% viz : in 
1906, The Juvenile, The Fashion, Tho Eclipse 1907, The Withers, The Ladies, The 41st Belniont for 
now yearlings. 1903, The 42.1 BMmsnt for foals of 13J5. Tne Tenth National Stallion Race of 1901 
will close for stallions at the same time. 



AUTUMN MEETING, 1905. 

The following events will close and name at 
midnight of Tuesday, August 15th, as 
by their several conditions 

For Two=Year=Olds. 

THE HDRRICANA-$I500 Added. 
The Hurkicana (selling), for two-year olds, 
maidens at time of entry By subscription of $50 
each, $20 forfeit, to the winner, with 11600 added 
of wblch $250 to the second, $150 to the third. 
Fire furlongs. 

THE RANCHO DEL PASO-$I500 Added. 
The Rancbo del Paso, for two year-olds, non 
winners of $5000 at time of entry. By subscription 
of $50 eaob. $20 forfeit to the winner, with $15110 
added, of which $250 to the second. $150 to the 
third. Named weights. Six furlongs. 

WHITE PLAINS HANDICAP— $3000 Added. 
The White Plains Handicap, for two-year- 
olds By subscription of $50 each, half forfeit, $10 
only ir declared, with $3000 added, of which $100 to 
the second, $.'00 to the third. Six furlongs. 

For Three=Year=0lds. 

THE HUNTER-$1500 Added. 
The Hunter Handicap, for fillies three years 
old. By subscription of $50 each, half forfeit, $10 
only if declared, with 11500 added, of which $250 
to the second, $150 to the third. One mile. 

THE FAIRVIEW-$1500 Added. 
The Fairview (selling), for three-year-olds. 
By subscription of $50 each, $20 forfeit, with $1500 
added, of which $250 to ihe second, $150 to the 
third. One mile and a sixteenth. 

THE DIXIANA— $1500 Added. 
The Dixiana, for three-year olds, non-winners 
of $5000 in 1905 at time of entrt . By subscription 
of $50 each, $20 forfeit, with $1500 added, of which 
$250 to the second, $150 to the third. Named 
weights. One mile. 

THE RAMAPO HANDICAP— $2000 Added. 
The Ramapo Handicap, for three-year-olds. 
By subscription of $20 each, $10 only If declared 
Starters ti pay $30 additional, with $2010 added 
of which $250 to the second, $150 to the third. 
Mile and a furlong. 

For TwoYear=Olds and Upward. 

THE MANHATTAN HANDICAP — $1800 Added 
The Manhattan Handicap. By subscription 
of $20 each, $10 only if declared. Starters to pay 
$30 additional, with $1800 added, of which $250 to 
the -econd, $150 to the third. Last si.r furlongs. 
Main Course. 

AUTUMN HIGH WEIGHT SERIAL HANDI 
CAPS-$5000 Added. 
By subscription of $30 each, which shall entitle 
the entry to start in each of the three handicaps 
viz: The Bronx, the Westchester and theFordham 
Highweight Handicaps on payment of an ad 
ditional starting fee of $10 for eacli race. Also 
all entries shah be handicapped free for all over 
night handicaps during the meeting If duly 
entered, saving declaration fees. 

Conditions of the Bronx Hiqhweioht 
Handicap. $10 additional forstarters. with 11500 
added, of which $300 to the second, $200 to the 
third. Last si.r furlongs. Main Course. 

Conditions ok the Westchester High weight 
Handicap ilOadditional for starters, with $1700 
added, of which $300 to the second, $201) to tin 
third Lost six and a half furlongs, Main Course 
Conditions ok the Fordham High weight 
Handicap. 1 10 additional forstartors, »lth$l800 
added, of which $100 to tho second. $200 to the 
third. Last seven furlongs. Main Course. 

stuff is objectionable in every W ay. a For Three-Year-Olds and Upward 

srial l r 

THE NEW ROCHELLE— $1500 Added. 
The New Rochelle (selling) at 10 lbs. above 
the scale. By subscription of $50 each $.'0 forfeit 
with $1500 added, of which $i50 to the second, $150 
to the third One mile. Main Course. 

Supplementary Entries for Autumn 
Meeting, 1905. 

For Two=Year=OIds. 

THE NURSERY HANDICAP— $3000 Added. 
The N'nitsERv Handicap. Subscription of $75 
each, the only forfeit If declared by 2 P. M. of the 
day before the race. If left in after that time to 
pay $l50each, w tb $3000 added of which $6IXJ to 
the second, $100 to the third. Six furlongs. 



I McMURRAY I 



Green Bone for Fowls. 



Aa an egg producer green bone baa no 
equal. Of course, it must be fed in 
moderation and in connection with a 
sufficient supply of everything else that 
a laying hen needs. 

There is a gieat difference in green 
bone; some material from the meat mar- 
kets is permitted to remain in the heat 
until it is unlit to feed to anything. Such 



man that would feed decayed mate 
to hena is not the kind of man to deal 
with. It is liable to lead to disease in 
the poultry and it is sure to impart a 
flavor to the eggs. 

Clean cut bone varies in quality because 
sometimes there is much more meat scrap 
with it than at other times. The raw 
meat scrap probably is more valuable 
than the cut bone, but a reasonable mix- 
ture of the two should be secured if 
possible. 

It is much better to have a bone cutter 
at the poultry house and to buy the green 
waste directly from the meat market as 
needed. If necessary, owing to distance, 
to keep a supply on hand, it should 1)3 
kept in an icebox or a cool place as care- 
fully as meat is kept for the table.— New 
York Farmer. 



THE CHAMPADNE-$5000 Added. 

The Champagne (condition), at $100 each, half 
forfeit, with $5000 added of which $1000 to the 
second, $500 to the third Seven furlongs. 

For Three=Year=01ds. 

THE JEROME-J2000 Added 

The Jerome Handicap. $100 each, half forfeit, 
$25 If declared by 2 i* m of the nay before the race, 
with $2000 added, of which $100 to the second, $200 
to the third. Mile and. lire-sixteenths. 

For Three*Year=01ds and Upward. 

THE MUNICIPAL II ANDICAP-$2500 Added. 

The Municipal Handicap, at $100 each, half 
forfeit, or $25 if declared by 2 p M of the day be- 
fore the race With $2500 added, of which $500 to 
the second, $300 to the third. Mile and three- 
quarters. 

BELMONT PARK AUTUMN WEIGHT FOR 
AGE RACE-$3000 Added. 

The Belmont Park Autumn Weight for Age 
Race, atJIOOeach. half forfeit. Wlth$3000added, 
of which $600 to the second, $300 to the third. 

TVo miles and a quarter. 

Steeplechases— Open and for Hunters 

THE CORINTHIAN OPEN STEEPLECHASE 
HANDICAP-$1000 Added. 
Probably run Tuesday, October 3d. 

The Corinthian Open Steeplechase Handi 
cap, to be ridden by gentlemen riders, qualified 
under the rules of the N S. & H. A or the C H. A 
If entered by August 15, 1905, at $25, $15 forfeit, or 
$5 only if declared. If entered September nth 
$50 each, half forfeit, or $10 only If declared the 
day preoedlng the race, with $1000 added, of which 
$200 to the second, $100 to the third, and 1100 in 
p'ate to the rider of the winner. The Whitney 
Course. About iwo miles and a half. 

THE BROOK CUP HANDICAP STEEPLE- 
CHASE— $5250 Added in Plate and Money. 
Probably run Saturday, October 7th. 

The Brook Cup Handicap Steeplechase. 
By subscription of $25 each, with $75 additional 
for starters. The Brook Club to offer a Gold Cup 
of the value of $2500, to be won twice, not neces 
sarily consecutively, by the same owner before 
becoming his property, with $2500 added to each 
race by the Westchester Racing Association 
The N. S. & H A. to present to the winner each 
vear plate of the value of $250 The winner to 
receive all the subscriptions, the starting fees 
and $1500 of the added money, the second $700 
the third $300 of the added money. About t/irei 
miles. 

THE HARBOR HILL CUP STEEPLECHASE— 
Mr. Clarence H. Macltay to add $3000 and a 
Silver Cup Probably run Monday, October 9tb. 
The Hahhor Hill Cup Steeplechase for 
three-year-olds. At $25 each and $50 additional 
for starters to the winner, with $3000 and a silver 
cup, both money and plate presen'ed by Mr 
Clarence H Mackay. The cup to be won twice! 
not necessarily consecutively, before becoming 
'he winner's property The second to receive 
$500. and the third $200 of the added money. To 
carry 135 lbs Winners of a steepleohase to oarry 
5 lb* extra; of two or more 10 lbs. extra. Short 
Course, about two miles. 

AUTUMN MEADOW BROOK HANDICAP 
STEEPLECHASE — $1000 Added. Probably 
run Thursday, October 12th 
The Autumn Meadow Brook Handicap 
Steeplechase, for Hunters qualified under the 
Rules of the N S &H A.orC. H A.. Gentle 
men Riders By subscription of $10 each and III 
additional for starters. If entered Au ust 15th 
If entered by 5 P M. of Monday, October 2, 1905 
at $20 each, and $30 additional for starters, with 
$1000 added, of which $200 to the second $100 to 
the third Mr August Belmont to add plate of 
the value of $100 to t f e winner, if ridden by a 
gentleman rider. Horses ridden by professlona 
riders to carry .% lbs more than Uo Welsh's 
allotted by the handicappcr About three milrs 

THE SEVENTH CHAMPION STEEPLE 
CHASE— About $12 000. 
Probably Run SaturJay, October Mtb. 

Supplementary Entry for the Seventi 
Champion Steeplechase, at $50 each. a> d 
$100 additional for starters. If m»de on or befoie 
Tuesday. August 15. 1905. with $9nm added: to tin 
second $1500, to the third $750 of the added money 
Named weights, penalties and allowances. The 
N S. & H. A. to present to the winner plate of the 
value of 1500. About three milis and a half. 



Notice. — Entries for tho above are received only under the conditions as 
printed an 1 in all re*p3Cts subject to and in accordance with tho Rules of The 
Jockey Club and The National Steeplechase and Hunt Association. Forentry 
blanks address 

The Breeder and Sportsman, 3<> Geary St., San Francisco, Cal. 



If you raise fifty pigs, the service 
fee for each one would be 50 cents, if you 
buy a pure-bred boar that costs $25. That 
is a small cost price for the early maturity, 
symmetry and evenness a bunch of pigs 
by a good sire will have. 

Sponges. S. Adderley, 307 Market St 



STANDARD BRED COLT FOR SALE. FUTURITY CANDIDATE FOR SALE. 

'PUREE YEARS OLD, GOOD SIZE, HAND 
*• some blood bay in color; good conformatlot 



POINTS: 

Perfect Construction, 
Light Weights, 
Great Strength, 
Easy Running, 
And LOW PRICES. 
McMURRAY SULKIES 

and JOGGING C\RTS 

STANDARD THE WORLD OVER. 
49-Address, for prlDtcd matter and prloes 

W. J. KENNEY 

631 Valencia St., San Francisco, Cal. 



FOR SALE. 

"A STRATH WAY" 

A Dapple Gray Gelding by Strathway out 
of a Thoroughbred Mare. 

MR FRISCO is 8 years old and SOU N D; 

weighs 1050 lbs. He is one of the grandest roaa 
horses In America today. Fearless of all objects 
on road; a very fast walker; does not pull or lug 
on the bit; carries his head high; goes straight 
and never stumbles; will stand when tied and 
there Is no road too long for him He is a good 
feeler and a good looker at all times, either be- 
fore or after driving. His speed qualities are 
phenomenal. He never saw a race track until 
last spring, when he was sent to Mr. Al MoDonald 
at the track at Pleasanton. who drove him a mile 
In 2:22 "j, last half in 1:0854, with only thirty 
days' training Mr. McDonald says he will trot 
a mile in 2:15 with three months' handling. The 
owner of this horse has to go East and has left 
the horse, buggy and harness In charge of Mr. 
Thomas Kinney at the Fashion Stables, who will 
show the horse or outfit. 

THOMAS KINNEY, 
Fashion Stables, Ellis St., S. F. 



Daedalion 2:10 For Sale. 

Can Beat His Record Three Times 
lo a Race. 

Is entered at Fresno and ready to start. 
A high-class Race Horse and a Coming Sire. 

Sire, DIABLO 2:09 1-4. 

Dam GRACE (dam of Daedalion 

2:10, Creole 2:15, Eagle 2:19J, etc.) 

by Buccaneer. 

Owner's business will not permit him to devote 
any time to racing. For furthor particulars 
address 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN. 

PARK HORSE FOR SALE. 

I IIGH-CLASS ROADSTER, COAL BLACK, 
15V4 hands, five years old. weighs 1000 pounds. 
Is a very handsome horse, a perfect beauty: fear- 
less of all things on the road: has been driven by 
a lady. Has lots of speed, but never trained on a 
traok. Sound and all rlzht. Sire and dam both 
registered. Apply to 

E. A. GRIGSBY. Napa, Cal. 

A GOOD FILLY FOR SALE. 

I I A NDSOME TWO-YEAR-OLD FILLY BY 
LL Lochlnvar 2:20, he ")y D'.reotor H. 2:27 by 
Director 2:17: first dam Myrtle by Sterling 6223; 
second dam Theresa by Prompter; third dam 
E i press by Flaxtall: fourth dam Lady Narley 
hy Marion, son of Mambrlno Chief 1 1. This Blly 
Is well broken, perfectly sound, good galted and 
a first-class prospect. For further particulars 
address J D BLAMEY, 

Box 715. Grass Valley Cal. 



on 

and a Urst-class Individual in every respect. 
With little work as a two-year-old he easily 
showed a 2:40 gait. Is perfeolly sound and good 
gaitcd. Sired by Iran Alto 2:I2H. dam Alma 
Wllkswood by Alcantara. For price and particu- 
lars address Breeder and Sportsman, 3fl Geary 
.Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



l^OR SALE— ATHENE BY DEXTER PRINCE; 
' first dam Athona 2:15 by Electioneer Bay 
mare, live years old, bred at Palo Alto. With 
partial training she has trottod quarters In .31 
She has a beautiful colt by Klnnev Lou foaled In 
April, 1905, and ontercd In tho Futurity stakes 
Both will bo sold at a very reasonable figure. 
Inquire of JNO. S. PHIPPEN, Trainer, 
Mayfleld, Cal. 



P^Hio-r^C TjlhlllattpH and »yP ewrl " 8n ready for framing 
rCUl^ICCS IdUUiaiCU Write for price*. Breeder and 
SPORTSMAN, 36 Geary Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



McClellan Saddles 



U.S. 
Army 

Sold to us at Government Arsenal 
change of regulation fmrn black CO 
russet leather coverinn. Strongest. BeBt 
nnil Easiest riding Saddle ever made. 
Fine serviceable order— used only a short 
time. Complete with Hair or Won Girth, 
Hooded stirrups. Coat straps. Cost V. S. 
Govt. tKi.li Our Bargain Price $4.90 — 
discount to dealers. V . s. Arniv Undies 
complete, serviceable, $1.00. 176 Page 
large illustrated catalogue. Regular 
Military Cyclopedia until. ■! I0o stamps. 
HUM IS lUSiNKItlUSi. SJ1I «'«»jr. Slew Vorl 
largest shxk In the world Mllll 
go, ni A... tton. i j \. m n en 



„fre.l f... 




TRAINING STABLE. 

1 1 AVING OPENED A TRAINING STABLE 
I 1 at tho Pleasanton Track, I am propared to 
handle four or tlvo more horses. Have trained 
and driven to reoord Rey Direct 2:10, Dlctatress 
2:08^, etc, etc. Can rofer to Geo. A. Davis and 
other owners Terms, etc., on application. Ad- 
dress • ED. S PARKER, Pleasanton, Cal. 



(172-680 Uth Avo. 
Hack of The Chutes. 



All kinds of Horses 
bought and sold. 



THE ZIBBELL STABLE 

/ 1 1 : 1 : 1 ; 1. 1 . & SON, Proprietors. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Hoarding, Training and Ifendllng all kinds of 
Fancy Horses. A few Nice Rigs on hand. Take 
any car going to the Chutes. Tel.: West 269. 



14 



{The gxsebj&c anb &pa*teman 



[August 5, 1905 




THE BAYWOOD STUD 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAL 

(Property of John Parrott, Esq.) 
Devoted Exclusively to the Breeding and Training of 

High Stepping 
Hackney Bred 
Harness Horses 

WALTER SEALI. Manager. 



Oleo Scandal Exposed. 



Dairy and Food Commissioner Warren 
of Pennsylvania informs President Roose- 
velt that oleo colored with azo, a poison- 
ous coal tar dye, has been sold for the 
best dairy butter to all the United States 
ships, the camp, marine barracks and 
hospital at League Island for many 
months. He also charged that the United 
States officers had knowledge of this oleo 
traffic as far back as March 25th. Two 
samples of supposed butter taken on 
board the receiving ship Lancaster, and 
one on the battleship Massachusetts were 
found to be colored oleomargarine, as also 
were the samples taken from the bar- 
racks and theeurboat Scorpion. 

It is understood that the contract with 
the federal government, under which 
this oleomargarine is furnished, expressly 
stipulates for fresh butter, "extra cream- 
ery." If this is bo the government is not 
getting under this contract what it has 
a right to get, and what the contractor 
agreed to furnish, but a much cheaper 
and inferior article, and is thus being 
defrauded. Not only that, but an unfair 
advantage is being taken of honestbidderb 
for this contract. 

Mr. Warren, in a detailed letter to the 
President, said: "Our department in this 
matter is acting with the single purpose 
of protecting the public from fraud, and 
to protect the dairy interests of the state, 
and we cannot proceed ourselves, aa it is 
a violation of the United States statute, 
and the only effective way to accomplish 
the purpose we have in mind is through 
a prosecution by the federal government." 

The President at once called a confer- 
ence at which were Commissioner War- 
ren and the attorney for the dairy and 
food commission of Pennsylvania. The 
meeting was presided over by President 
Roosevelt, who assured the dairymen 
that the matter would receive prompt 
consideration by the proper officials of 
the federal government, a ter which an 
order for a complete investigation by the 
navy department was made. — Exchange. 
o 

Quality in Native Steers. 

The principal cause of lack of quality 
among home-bred steers is not due so 
much to lack of infusion of pure blood aB 
to the indiscriminate admixture of the 
blood of breeds of both beef and fatty 
types. 

The practice of shifting frequently from 
one line of meat production to another, 
or from meat making to dairying, with 
the ups and downs of the markets, has 
brought with it disastrous results. It is 
this practice which has led to more or lees 
breeding back and forth of the same 
females to beef or dairy sires and the con- 
sequent production of mixed types. In 
shifting from one line of meat production 
to another while the few may make so- 
called lucky hits, in general the practice 
is disastrous, if we are to succeed we 
mirst adhere tenaciously to fixed lines of 
production. 

The individual who can speedily and 
successfully adapt himself to radical 
changes is extremely rare. We desire to 
issue a word of warning concerning the 
purchase of young cattle for grazing or 
feeding from dealers who occasionally 
pick up so-called bargains in stock. 
o 

Sober up on Jackson's Napa Soda. 



PRIVILEGES! 

FOR SALE. 

Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders 
Association Race Meeting at 

SANTA ROSA 

AUGUST 16, 17, J8 and 19, 1905 

IJlDS FOR THE FOLLOWING PRIVILEGES 
" will be received up to Monday noon, Aug. 7th: 

BETTING (Auction and Mutuel or 
Totalization Pools) 

FRUIT, CANDY, NUTS and 

ICE CREAM 
PROGRAMMES 

A certified check for 50 per cent should accom- 
pany all bids Right reserved to reject any or 
all bids. 

MUSIC 

Estimates will be received for furnishing 
Music— 8 or 10 men to play one hour each day for 
four days in band wagon on street and from 2 to 
J:.30 o'clock at the track. 



Address 



F. W. KELLEY, Secretary, 
36 Geary 8treet. San Francisco. 



J\/v 



California Safe Deposit 
and Trust Company 



Receives Savings Deposits of 
Ten Dollars and Upwards 



IT PAYS INTEREST 

TWICE A YEAR 

Rate— 

3H per cent on ordinary accounts 
3 6-10 per cent on term accounts 



CAPITAL AND SURPLUS ••■ $1,500,399 46 
TOTAL ASSETS 7,665,839 38 



Deposits may be made by P. O. Order, 
Wells-Fargo Money Order or Bank Draft 
Send for Pamphlets Descriptive of Our 
Business 



OFFICES 
Cor California and Montgomery StB. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



■n/vt 



Absorbine 

REMOVES 
BPRSAL ENLARGEMENTS, 
THICKENED TISSl ES. 
INFILTRATED PARTS, and any 
PIFF OR SWELLING, CURES 
LAMENESS, ALLAYS PAIN 
without laving the horse up. Does not 
blister, stain or remove the hair. ,«2.00 a 
bottle, delivered. Pamphlet IB free. 
A1$SORI5INE,.TR.,f(>rmank!nil.i?l.no 
Bottle. Cures Synovitis, weeping sinew, strains, 
Gouty or Rheumatic Deposits. Allays Pain. Hook 
Iree. Manufactured only by 

W. F. YOUNG, P. D. V., 
64 Monmouth Street. Springfield, Mass. 

Forsaleby Maclt&Co Langiey &MlchaelsCo. 
aldington & Co., J. O'Kane and J. A. McKerron, 
all of San Francisco 



Deposit Your 
Idle Funds 



WITH THE 




Central Trust Company 
of California 



42 Montgomery I St, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



You can open a Savings Account 
by mail with any sum 
large or small. 

INTEREST PAID SEMI-ANNUALLY 

3 1-4% on Ordinary Savings 
3 6-10% on Term Savings 

Send for Booklet, 
••THE SURE WAY TO WEALTH." 



COMPRESSED PIIRE^ALT BRICKS 
f PATENT FEEDERS 

Handy No Waste. No Neglect 
^Refined Dairy 5alt tells. 

W ASK YOUR DEALER. 

H B WE LL 5END B00K FREE 
■&KLMOIUSMMY(0 

PATENTEES ■ MANUFACTURERS 

B R O OKLVIM^ N .Y. 



HEALDS 



BUSINESS COLLEGE 
24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal, 



The oldest, the largest, the most popular com- 
nerclal school on the Pacific Coast. 2fl,U00 gradu 
ates; 30 teachers; TO typewriters; over 300 students 
annually placed In positions. Send (or catalogue 



K. P. HKALD. President. 



O. F. WILLEY CO. 

(Established 1855) 

Carriage Builders and Dealers 
Harness, Robes and Whips. 

AGENTS FOR 

Itrewster & Co . New York, of ISroonie St. 
KaofTman Buggy Co, Miamisburg, Ohio 
<!. s, CafTrey Co , Camden, N. J 

Cotin«-rt*ville Itupgy Co , ( r-Mile Ind. 

Watertown Carriage Co.. Watertown. N. Y. 
Walborn <S Klker Pony Vehiclts, St Paris, O. 

23-27 Hayes and 1 622-28 Market St. 

(Under St. Nicholas Hotel) 
Pbone South 1063 SAN FRANCISCO 




QOCOANUT OIL CAKE 

THE BEST FEED FOK 

STOCK, CHICKENS AND PldS 

FOR SALE IN LOTS TO SUIT BY 

EL DORADO LINSEED OIL WORKS CO. 

308 California Street, San Francisco, Cal, 



CALIFORNIA 

NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY 

Through Picturesque California. 

The Ideal Route for 

TIib ADgler and Ontina Trips 

One day's ride from San Francisco will take 
you to some of the finest Trout Streams In the 
State. Along the lino and within easy distance 
are many of the best Springs and Summer Resorts 
in the State. The Company maintains a Fish 
Hatchery and annually stocks the many streams 
reached by its road One million Trout Fry were 
planted last year In these streams. 

Black Bass Fishing can be enjoyed in Russian 
River near Guerneville, Guernewood Park and 
Camp Vacation, in season. 

The best Striped Bass Fishing waters on the 
Coast reached by the Tlburon Ferry. 

VACATION FOR 190B 

Issued annually by the Company, Is now ready. 
This Is the standard publication on the Coast for 
information regarding Mineral Springs, Resorts, 
Country Homes and Farms where summer board- 
ers are taken, and Select Camping Spots. 

Beautifully Illustrated, 150 pp and can be had 
In response to mail request or at ticket offices. 

Ticket Offices-650 Market Street (Chronicle 
Bldg) and Tiburon Ferry, foot of Market Street. 

General Office— Mutual Life Ins Bldg., cor. 
Sansome and California Sib., San Francisco. 
JAS. 1. FRAZIER, R, X. RYAN, 

Gen. Mgr. Gen. Pass. Agt. 



PHENOL SODIQUE 





lioals 

CUTS, BURNS 
and SORES. 

THE BEST 
Antiseptic 
Dressing 
for 

feoL somaiffi Man or Beast - 

Ke p handy for emer- 
• gencles in home 
and stable. 

5 Equally good for dogs 
■-■ 7 ir7Hii ancl a " animals. 

"ANCC BROTHE RS > WHITE- 1 j f nQt a , yQUr druR . 

' gists, small size sent 
to any address upon 
receipt of 10c 



HANCE BROTHERS & WHITE 

Pharmaceutical Chemists 
PHILADELPHIA CHICAGO 





TRAINING AND BOARDING STABLES 

DEVISADERO AND FULTON STREETS. 

(1308 Fulton Street) 

Business Horses For Hire. 

I have opened a new Boarding and Training 
Stable near the above corner, and will board and 
train for racing, road use or matinee driving a 
limited number of first-class horses at reasonable 
rates Have good location, brand-new stable and 
everything first-class. All horses In my care will 
receive the best of attention. 

T. C. CABNEY. 
Telephone: Page 4147. 



Chronic Bronchitis and Catarrh of the Bladder 
Cored In 48 Honrs. 



CAPSULES 



r 



Superior to Copaiba, Cnb»tM or Inleotlcn 



Photo Engraving Company 

HIGH CLASS ART 
IN 

Half Tones and Line Engraving 

Artistic Designing. 
606 Mission St., cor. First, San Francisco 



AUGUST 5, 1905| 



15 



THE CONSOLATION HANDICAP 



Held at Indlauapolls, June 27-30, 1905. was won by Mr. Jas. T. Atkinson of Newcastle, Pa., score 99 out of 100 from the 18-yard mark, using 

PETERS FACTORY LOADED SHELLS 

This was the Only Event During the Entire Grand American which was won from Kehlnd the 
16-yard Line. Many other Notable Scores were made with Peters Shells, among them the following: 
l ?t on Practice Day, F. M See (tie), 99 out of 100. 1st on First Day, L. H. Reid (tie), 99 out of 100. 2d In Preliminary, Wm Veach (tie), 9" out of 100. 3d In Grand American, M. Arle (tie), 97 out of 100. 

In the Consolation Handicap, 2 soores of 98, 5 of 97, 4 of 9G and 25 others above 90 were made with Peters Shells 

All of which merely goes to prove that Peters Shells are WINNERS. 

THE PETERS CARTRIDGE CO., Cincinnati, Ohio 

New York: 98 Chambers Street, T. H, KELLER, Manager. 




YOUR 
GUN 



YOU may need a new one this fall; DO NOT wait until yon want 
It. OKDER NOW. REMEMBER It takes time to make a gun and 
make one RIGHT. We do not care to make one any other way. 
If yon DON'T know all about a gnn write to us; we may be able 
to serve JUST YOIT. We have had over forty years' experience, and it's yours for the 
asking. Tell us what you want Write to-day. 



32 Warren St., New York City. 



30 Cherry St., Meriden, Conn. 



The Hunter 

Is Absolutely 
Perfect 



One-Trigger 

Put on Any L. C. SMITH 
GUN, New or Old. 




HUNTER ARMS CO., FULTON, NEW YORK 

SMITH GUNS SHOOT WELL. 





NEW MODEL 
AUTOMATIC 
EJECTOR 




We Make 16 Qrades, $17 75 to $300. 



Write for ART CATALOQ to 



THE ITHACA GUN CO., Ithaca, N. Y. 

°tl Coast Branch. PHIL B. BEKEART C0..JI4 Second_St., San Francisco 

SHREVE & BARBER CO. 



PIONEER DEALERS 



739 
Market St. 

Send tor 
Catalogue 




521 
Kearny St. 

Mailorders 
a Specialty 



GUNS, AMMUNITION, FISHING [TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS 



SAN FBAJNCJ9CO, 



CALIFORNIA. 



Ballistite Wins! 

Both the High Amateur and General Average 

AND ALSO THE 

Phil B. Bekeart Challenge Trophy--100 Birds- 

At the Second Annual Tournament of the Pacific Coast Trap 
Shooters Association, Ingleside, May 28, 29, 30, were won with 



If You Have Not Yet Tried It, Do So. You Will Like It. 

BAKER & HAMILTON 



SAN 



PACIFIC COAST AGENTS 
FRANCISCO SACRAMENTO 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

IMPROVED 

STALLION SERVICE BOOKS 

(POCKET SIZE) 

100 Pages. Price $1, postpaid. 

Most Complete Book 
ol the kind published. 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 
3G Geary St.. San Francisco. 



BREEDERS' DIRECTORY. 



"HOWARD SHORTHORNS' — QUINTO 
HERD— 77 premiums. California State Fairs 
190&-3-4. Registered cattle of beef and milking 
families for sale. Write us what you want. 
Howard Cattle Co , 206 Sansome Street, San 
Franolsco. 



PETER SAXK & SON. Llok House, S. F..Cal. 
Importers, Breeders and Dealers for past 30 years. 
All varieties Cattle, Horses, Sheep, Hogs. High- 
class breeding stock. Correspondence solicited. 



HOLSTEINS— BUTTER BRED FAMILIES. 
Work herd; 90% winners at State and county fairs, 
show ring, and every butter content slnoe 1885 in 
California. No reservations. Stock near S. F. 
F. H. Burke, 30 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

JERSEYS, HOLSTEIN8 AND DCRHAM8. 
Dairy Stock speolally. Hogs, Poultry. Estab- 
lished 1876. William Ntles St. Co.. Irfw Angeles 
Oal. 



VETERINARY. 



ID i*. W zxl, F. Bgan, 

M. R. O. V. S., F. E. V. M. S. 

VETERINARY SURGEON. 

Member of the Royal College of Veterinary 
Surgeons, England; Fellow of the Edlnburg 
Veterinary Medical Soolety ; Graduate of the New 
Veterinary College, Edinburgh; Veterinary Sur- 
geon to the S. F. Fire Department; Live Stock 
Inspector forNew Zealand and Australian Colonlet 
at the port of San Francisco; Professor of Equina 
Medicine, Veterinary Surgery, Veterinary Depart- 
ment University of California: Ex-President oi 
the California State Veterinary Medical Associa- 
tion; Veterinary Infirmary, Residence and Office, 
San Franolsco Veterinary Hospital, 1117 Golden 
Gate Avenue, near Webster St., San Francisco: 
Telephone Park 128. 



IF YOU WISH TO ADVERTISE^ 

IN NEWSPAPERS) 
ANYWHERE AT ANYTIME 
Call on or Write 

!!E.C.DAKE'S ADVERTISING AGEBCI 

124 Sansome Street 

6AN FRANCI8CO, CALIF, f 



AT STUD. 



Ch. CUBA OF KENWOOD 

(Glenbeigh Jr.— Stella) 
CUBA JR. 

(Ch. Cuba of Kenwood- Florida) 
One of the highest class Field Trial winners In 
America. Seven wins in nine Trials before he 
was two years old. 

STOCKDALE KENNELS 

R. BE. DODGE, Manager, 
Kakerafleld, Kern Co., 

Boarding. Pointer Puppies and well-broken 
Dogs for sale. 

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 



Advertltements under this head one cent per word 
per insertion. Cash to accompany order. 



COLLIES 



rpREMENDOUS BARGAINS IN COLLIES. 

Send in order and get the very best at bottom 
price. GLEN TANA COLLIE KENNELS. P. 
O. Box 1907 Spokane, Wash. 



T he Cocker Spaniel 

Its History, Points, 
Standard, Care, 
Training, Etc. 

PRICE, POSTPAID, 50 CENTS 

The instructions on Care, Training, etc., apply 
to other breeds as well as to Cockers, and it is a 
useful book for the dog owner. Tells how to 
teach them to perform tricks. 

FOR SALE BY THE 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 



-DEALERS IN- 



55-57-59-61 First Street, S. F. 
Telephone Main 199 

CALIFORNIA 



PEDIGREES TABULATED 

And type written 
Ready for framing, 
WrUe for prloes. 

Bkebder and Sportsman, 36 Geary Street 
San Franoisoo, Oal. 



16 



f August 5, 1905 




'i ne Harness 

'ORSE BOOTS 



DEER 
HUNTING 

AUG. 1 to OCT. 15 

You'll Need a 



Write for Illustrated catalog 

PACIFIC COAST DEPOT \ 

86-88 FIRST ST., S. F. 




DEER 
HUNTING 

AUG. 1 to OCT. It 

Be Sure to Use 




AMMUNITION 

Write fo* Illustrated Catalog. 

PACIFIC COAST depot: 



E. E. DRAKE, 



Manager 



A^rT^EXJTXriTIOTXT, RIFLBS, SHOTGrTJNS 

WERE AWARDED THE 

ONLY GRAND PRIZE 



BY THE SUPERIOR JURY AT THE ST. LOUIS EXPOSITION, 1904. 



The Official RecorJs Show 

tbat at tbe 
GRAND AMERICAN HANDICAP 
Indianapolis, Ind., June 27-30, 

Du PONT SMOKELESS 

won everyone of the 

EIGHT PRIZES 

(Grand American Handicap, Preliminary 
Handicap, Consolation Handicap and 
the Five Men State Team 
Championship) 

and 

MORE THAN FIFTY PER CENT OF 
THE TOTAL PURSES 



C. P. W. BR ANDS. 

SMOKELESS SHOTGUN SHELLS. 

PATTERN 

PERFECTION 

INVINCIBLE 

Loaded with Any Standard Brand of 
Smokeless Powder. 

When ordering from your dealer mention OUR BRANDS 
and kind of Powder wanted. 

We guarantee our loading. 

California Powder Works 

Wells-Fargo Bldg,, 49 Second St 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



General Average 

For the Tournament at Indianapolis 
won by 
W. R. Crosby 
with a score of 298 ex 300, using 

New E, C. Improved 

"Fred A. Stone Scarescrow Trophy" 
which was awarded the 
High Professional 
in the 

Grand American Handicap 
won by 
W. G. Hearne 
using 

"INFALLIBLE" Smokeless 

LAFLIN & RAND POWDER CO. 



Clabrough, Golcher & Co, 



GUNS 
Gun Goods 

JWSend for Catalogue. 




FISHING 
Tackle 



538 MARKET STREET, S. F. 



These are the Brands of 

factory ... eun I o 

LOADED OPILL L- W 

PACIFIC 

CHALLENGE 

SUPERIOR 

EXCELSIOR 



[August 12, 1906 



WESTCHESTER RACING ASSOCIATION 

Under the Auspices of The Jockey Club and National Steeplechase and Hunt Association 

race Course, Belmont park Office, 571 Fifth Ave.. New York 



Queens, long island, N. Y. 



"THE WUDSOR ARCADE" 



1906 1907 1908 

SPECIAL NOTICE TO OWNERS AND TRAINERS 

The fixed events for now yearlings, to run when two years old In 1906, when three years old in 
1907, and for foals of 1905 to ran la 1908 will be duly announced to olose September IS, 1905, viz : in 
1906, The Juvenile, The Fashion, The Eclipse 1907, The Withers, The Ladies, The 41st Belmont for 
now yearlings. 1908, The Hi Bjlmont for foals of 1935. Tne Tenth National Stallion Race of 1904 
will close for stallions at the same time. 



AUTUMN MEETING. 1905, 

The following events will close and name at 
midnight of Tuesday, August 15th, as 
by their several conditions. 

For Two-Year=0lds. 

THE HURRICANA-11500 Added. 
Tni Hurricaka (selling), for two-year olds, 
maidens at time of entry By subscription of 85U 
each, $20 forfeit, to the winner, with SI500 added, 
of wbloh $250 to the second, $150 to the third. 
Fire furtongt. 

THE RANCHO DEL PASO-$!500 Added. 
The Rancbo dbl Paso, for two year-olds, non- 
winners of $5000 at time of entry. By subscription 
of $50 each. $20 forfeit to the winner, with $1500 
added, of which $250 to the second. $150 to the 
third. Named weights, six furlongs. 

WHITE PLAINS HANDICAP-$3000 Added. 

The Wbitb Plains Handicap, for two-year- 
olds By subscription of $50 each, half forfeit. $10 
only if declared, with $3000 added, of which $400 to 
the second, $.'00 to the third. Six furlongs 

For Tbree=Year=0Ids. 

THE HUNTER-$1500 Added. 
Tub Hunter Handicap, for Allies three years 
old. By subscription of $50 each, half forfeit, $10 
only if declared, with $1500 added, of which $250 
to the second, $150 to the third. One mite. 

THE FAIRVIEW-$I500 Added. 
The Fairview (selling), for three-year-olds 
By subscription of $50 each, $20 forfeit, with $1500 
added, of which $250 to ihe second, $150 to the 
third. One milt and a sixteenth. 

THE DIXIANA-$1500 Added. 
The Dixiana, for three-year olds, non-winners 
of $5000 In 1905 at time of entrj By subscription 
of $50 each, $20 forfeit, with $1500 added, of which 
$250 to the second, $150 to the third. Named 
weights. One mile. 

THE RAMAPO HANDICAP— $2000 Added. 
The Rahapo Handicap, for three-year-olds. 
By subscription of $20 each, $10 only if declared. 
Starters 1 i pay $30 additional, with $20(10 added, 
of which $250 to the second, $150 to the third. 
Mile and a furlong. 

For Two=Year=01ds and Upward. 

THE MANHATTAN HANDICAP— $1800 Added. 

The Manhattan Handicap. By subscription 
of $20 each, $10 only if declared. Starters to pay 
$30 additional, with $1800 added, of which $250 to 
the »econd, $150 to the third. Last sir furlongs, 
Main Course. 

AUTUMN HIGHWEIGHT SERIAL HANDI- 
CAPS— $5000 Added. 

By subscription of $30 each, which shall entitle 
the entry to start In each of the three handicaps, 
viz: The Bronx, the Westchester and theFordham 
Htghweight Handicaps on payment of an ad 
dltional starting fee of $10 for each race. Also 
all entries shall be handicapped free for all over 
night handicaps during the meeting if duly 
entered, saving declaration fees. 

Conditions of the Bronx Hk;hwei<;ht 
Handicap. $10 additional forstarters. with $1500 
added, of which $300 to the second. $200 to the 
third. Last six furlongs, Main Course. 

Conditions okthe Westchester Hiuhweight 
Handicap. SIO additional for starters, with $1700 
added, of which $300 to the second, $200 to the 
third Last six and a half furlongs, Main Course. 

Conditions of the Fordham High weight 
Handicap. $10 additional for starters. with$1800 
added, of which $W0 to the second. $200 to the 
third. Last seren furlongs. Main Course. 

For Three=Year=01ds and Upward 

THE NEW ROCH ELLE — $1500 Added. 
The New Rochelle (selling) at 10 lbs. above 
the scale. By subscription of $50 each $20 forfeit, 
with $1500 added. of which $250 to the second, $150 
to the third One mile, Main Course. 

Supplementary Entries for Autumn 
Meeting, 1905. 

For Two=Year=01ds. 

THE NURSERY HANDICAP-$30O0 Added. 

The Ndrsery Handicap. Subscription of $75 
each, the only forfeit If declared by 2 p m of the 
day before the race If left in after that time to 
pay $l50each. w th $3XK) added of which $600 to 
the second, $100 to the third. Six furlongs. 



THE CHAMPAGNE-$5000 Added. 

The Champagve (condition), at $100 each, half 
forfeit, with $5000 added of which $1000 to the 
second, $500 to tho third. Am furlongs. 

For Three-Year=0lds. 

THE JEROME-$2000 Added. 

The Jerome Handicap. $100 each, half forfeit, 
$25 if declared by 2 p. m of the day before the race, 
with $2000 added, of which $400 to the second, $200 
to the third. Mile and fire-sixteenths. 

For Three-Year=0lds and Upward. 

THE MUNICIPAL HANDICAP — $2500 Added. 

The Municipal Handicap, at $100 each, half 
forfeit, or $25 if declared by 2 p M of the day be- 
fore the race. With $2500 added, or which $500 to 
the second, $300 to the third. Mile and three- 
quarters. 

BELMONT PARK AUTUMN WEIGHT FOR 
AGE RACE-$3000 Added. 

The Belmont Park Autumn Weight for Age 
Race, at $100 each, half forfeit. With $3o00added, 
of which $600 to the second, $300 to the third. 

7Vo miles and 11 quarter. 

Steeplechases— Open and for Hunters 

THE CORINTHIAN OPEN STEEPLECHASE 
HANDICAP-$1000 Added. 
Probably run Tuesday, October 3d. 

The Corinthian Open Steeplechase Handi- 
cap, to be ridden by gentlemen riders, qualified 
under the rules of the N S. & H. A. or the C H. A. 
If entered by August 15, 1905. at $25, $15 forfeit, or 
$5 only if declared. If entered September 14th, 
$50 each, half forfeit, or $10 only if deolared the 
day preeedlng the race, with $1000 added, of which 
$200 to the second, $100 to the third, and $100 in 
plate to the rider of the winner. The Whitney 
Course. About two miles and a half. 

THE BROOK CUP HANDICAP STEEPLE- 
CHASE— $5250 Added In Plate and Money. 
Probably run Saturday, October 7th. 

The Brook Cup Handicap Steeplechase. 
By subscription of $25 each, with $75 additional 
for starters. The Brook Club to offer a Gold Cup 
of the value of $.'500, to be won twice, not neces- 
sarily consecutively, by the same owner before 
becoming bis property, with $2500 added to each 
race by the Westchester Racing Association 
The N. S. & H. A. to present to the winner each 
year plate of the value of $250 The winner to 
receive all the subscriptions, the starting fees 
and $1500 of the added money, Ihe second $700 
the third $300 of the added money. About three 
miles. 

THE HARBOR HILL CUP STEEPLECHASE — 
Mr. Clarenee H. Mackay to add $3000 and a 
Silver Cup. Probably run Monday, October 9th. 
The Harbor Hill Cup Steeplechase for 
three-year-olds. At $25 each and $50 additional 
for starters to the winner, wiih $3000 and a silver 
cup, both money and plate presented by Mr 
Clarence H Mackay. The cup to be won twice, 
not necessarily consecutively, before becoming 
the winner's property The seoond to receive 
$500. and the third $200 of the added money. To 
carry 135 lbs Winners of a steeplechase to carry 
5 lbs. extra: of two or more 10 lbs. extra. Short 
Course, about two miles. 

AUTUMN MEADOW BROOK HANDICAP 
STEEPLECHASE — $1000 Added. Probably 
run Thursday, October 12tb. 
The Autumn Meadow Brook Handicap 
Steeplechase, for Hunters, quallfled under the 
Rules of the N. S & H. A. or C. H A., Gentle- 
men Riders. By subscription ot $10 each and $15 
additional for starters, if entered August 15th 
If entered by 5 p. m. of Monday. October 2, 1905. 
at $20 each, and $30 additional for starters, with 
$1000 added, of which $200 to the second $100 to 
the third Mr August Belmont to add plate of 
the value of $100 to the winner. If ridden by a 
gentleman rider. Horses ridden by professional 
riders to carry 5 lbs. more than the weights 
allotted by the handicapper. About three miles. 

THE SEVENTH CHAMPION STEEPLE- 
CHASE— About $12 000. 
Probably Run Saturday, October 14 lb. 

Supplementary Entry for the Seventh 
Champion Steeplechase, at $50 each, and 
$100 additional for starters, if made on or before 
Tuesday. August 15, 1905. with $9000 added: to the 
second $1500, to the third $750 of the added money. 
Named weights, penalties and allowances. The 
N. S. & H. A. to present to the winner plate of the 
value of $500. About three miles and a half. 



Notice — Entries for the above are received only under the conditions as 
printed an i in all raspjots subject to and in accordance with the Rule9 of The 
Jockey Club and The NitioDal Steeplechase and Hunt Association. For entry 
blanks address 

Thk Breeder and Sportsman, 36 Geary St., San Francisco, Cal. 



PHONE PARK 102 



A. J. MARTIN, Prop, 

HULDA STABLES 

BOARDING AND LIVERY 

15QO FEII1I1 STB.BJBT 



BEST OF ACCOMMODATIONS. 
CALL ANU 8KK FOR YOURSELF. 



BET. LYON AND CENTRL AVE. 

Hayes St Cars Fass the Door 



Pp»H i 0*rP»<aC T«hlllfltl?H atd typ9 written rea(J y for Naming 
rCUlgrCCa ldUUiaiCU Write for prices. Breeder and 

Sportsman, 36 Geary Street, San Francisco, Cal. 





Special Light,£Low 
Seat, Pneumatic 
Speed Cart, No. 1, 
Especially adapted 
for track use. 



It Is the Lightest Long-Shaft 
Track Cart In the World. 



TOOMBY 

TWO WHEELERS 

ARE THE LEADERS. 

Sulkies In All Sizes. 

Pneumatic 
Road and Track Carts. 

Pneumatic Pole Carts 

for Team Work on both Road 
and Traok. 

High Wheel Jog Carts, 

Long Shaft Breaking Carts. 

Send for latest Catalogue to 

S. TOOMEY & GO. 

Canal Dover, Ohio, V. S. A. 

O'BRIEN & SONS 

coast agents 

Golden Gatb Ave. & Polk St. 
SAN FRANCHCO, CAL. 



75 PER CENT 

USE AND RECOMMEND 



OF ALL HORSE OWNERS 
AND TRAINERS 



Campbell'sHorse Foot Remedy 

SOLD BY ... 

SAYRE & SON Sacramento, Cal 

R. T. FRAZIER Pueblo, Colo 

J. G. READ & BRO Ogden, Utah 

JUBINVILLE & NANCE Butte, Mont 

& 1 Wwi A ' A- KRAFT co Spokane, Wash 

l[& BPiPw A - F - HOSKA HARNESS CO. . . . Tacoma, Wash 
WlDEil WmiMffl MCSORLEY & HENDERSON.... Seattle, Wash 

mKl mfwSt JBIPr C ' RODDER StocktOD, Cal 

WM. E. DETELS Pleasanton, Cal 

iwSk W - C - TOPPING San Diego, Cal 

H§lpj» JEPSEN SADDLERY CO Los Angeles, Cal 

'ixi&r? MPZffffli H - THOR WALDSON Fresno, Cal 

1 JOS. McTIGCJE San Francisco, Cal 

BRYDON BROS. HARNESS MFG CO 

Los Angeles, Cal 

JAS. B. CAHPBELL&CO.. Manufacturers, 4 12 W.fladlson St., CHICAGO , ILL 





Cut=Under Truck 



This Truck Is the result of years of endeavor to produce a wagon that has great 
carrying capacity, ample strength without superfluous weight, low 
enough to the ground to minimize the labor of loading. 
Can turn short among trees, and can be used on 
the roads as well as on the farm. 
The "Jersey" Is a pronounced success, not only for the transportation of fruit, 
but as a general purpose dray In villages and small oitles. 



HOOKER dtb 

16-18 DEUMM ST., SAN FKANCISCC 



DEXTER PRINCE STABLES "=«r 

TRAINING, BOARDING AND SALE 

Cor. of Grove and Baker Streets, just at the Panhandle Entrance to Golden Gate Park 

(Take Hayes, McAllister or Devlsadero Street Cars) 

Best located and healthiest Stable in San Franelsoo. Always a good roadster on hand for 
sale. Careful and experienced men to oare for and exerolse park roadsters and prepare bones for 
track use. Ladles can go and return to stable d not have their horses frightened by automobiles 
or cars. 



MANHAJtan 



[Awarded Gold Medal 
At California State 
Fair 1898. 

[Every horse owner who 
lvalues his stock should 
(constantly have a sup- 
ply of It on hand. It 
(improves and keeps 
|stock In the pink of 
•ondltlon. 

flanhatian Pood Co 

1 253 Folsom St., San FrancUoo 
Ask your grocers or dealers for It. 



RED BALL BRAND. 

Positively Cures Colic, Scouring and Indigestion. 

C. P. KKKTKI.L, Manager 



August 12 1905] 



f&hc gvccbcv ditto gtptfvtsmcm 



3 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

F. W. KELLEY, PBOPRUTOB. 

Turf and Sporting Authority ot the Pacific Coast. 

— omci— 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

BOX 2300. 



bench of San Joaquin County, whore he served until 
1874. Judge Greene resigned and went to Oakland 
in 1875, where he followed his profession until 1879, 
when he was elected Superior Judge. Election after 
election followed with Judge Greene always returned 



HOOF BEATS 

See Zolock pace at Santa Rosa. 



The meeling opens on Wednesday next. 



by a large vote. A year or so ago^hls health began The tmck record will sure | y be broken. 



Telephone: 



P. O. 
Black 586. 



ermi- One Tear 83, Six Months S1.7S, Three Months SI 
STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 
^.Money snould be sent by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
Iddressed to F. W. Kelley, 38 Geary St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Communications mast be acoompanled by the writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee 
of good faith. 

San Francisco, Saturday, August 12, 1905 

A RACING LAW is needed in California and the 
owners, breeders and trainers of harness horses should 
unite in an effort to have a reasonable statute gov- 
erning racing passed at the next session of the Legis- 
lature. One has only to read the dally press to know 
that all over this country, except in those States 
where such laws are in force, the harness meetings 
are being interfered with, and will continue so to be, 
unless horsemen organize for the protection of their 
interests. It is perfectly plain to all that this fight 
against betting on speed contests was not inaugurated 
to suppress harness racing, but has been instigated 
on account of the long continued running meetings 
and the presence of pool rooms. Ohio, Illinois, Mis- 
souri, Indiana, New Jersey and many other States 
have laws prohibiting betting on horse races, and 
these laws were passed with the sole purpose of clos- 
ing the pool rooms and stopping the running meet- 
ings which had fallen into the hands of, and were 
being conducted by race track gamblers. We do not 
believe there is a community in the United States 
where a week of clean racing would not be welcome, 
as nine-tenths of the people love good horses and 
enjoy seeing them race, but if the pool rooms and 
bookmakers' meetings can be suppressed in no other 
way than by prohibiting all betting, then these com- 
munities will willingly agree to such prohibition, as 
the sentiment of the majority of the people in this 
country is that race track gambling is, an evil that 
must be checked. The time has passed for argument 
that betting on horse races is no greater evil than 
gambling in wheat or other futures. The thing for 



to fail and he slowly declined. At times a serious 
throat trouble gave his family cause for grave alarm, 
but he resisted the encroachment of the disease with 
the strong will that was characteristic of the man. 
Judge Greene married Isabelle Webster in I860. He 
lost his wife In 1893, and his high devotion to his 
family has been one of his chief characteristics. Four 
children survive him — Mrs. J. B. R. Cooper of Mon- 
terey. Mrs. Lathrop W. Jewett of San Francisco, Carl- 
ton W. Greene, also of this city, and Laurence L. 
Greene, deputy prosecuting attorney of Oakland. 

Cherishing a great love for the trotting horse. Judge 
Greene had been a breeder of fine stock since his 
boyhood. He brought the stallion Winthrop 505 to 
this State in 1S70, and always owned a few well bred 
trotting mares that he mated to the best stallions 
in the State. He was a close friend of the late Count 
Valensin and acted as one of the executors of that 
gentleman's estate, sending the stallion Sidney and a 
number of other horses from the Valensin farm to 
New York, where they were sold by the lat'e Peter 
C. Kellogg. Among- the horses bred by Judge Greene 
was that good winner and fast trotter Judge Greene 
2:09 which East View Farm leased and raced, and 
was named by Monroe Salisbury for his owner when 
making the entries. Many other horses with records, 
and stallions and mares that have produced standard 
speed were bred by Judge Greene. He was a grand 
character—one of those straightforward, dignified, yet 
approachable, men who attracted men to him by his 
cordial manner, and commanded their respect by his 
unswerving rectitude. His death is a loss to Cali- 
fornia. 



WHILE WE BELIEVE that wagering on speed con- 
tests is no crime, and when indulged in, as it is at 
county fairs and short meetings, is a clean, legitimate 
sport, we take no stock in the argument raised by 
some that harness racing cannot be conducted without 
it. For proof of this the following from that reliable 
journal.' the Western Horseman, is good testimony: 

"That one's loss is another's gain was never truer 
than is the case in the present situation in harness 
horse racing. The anti-pool selling crusade is hard 
on many trotting associations, but it will prove a har- 
vest for the county, district and State fair associa- 
tions, most of which never have pool selling in con- 
nection with their races. The inevitable effect of the 
interference with the strictly racing meetings will be 
a great rush of horses to the fair meetings at which 
horse owners and breeders to do is to recognize the .good purses are offered in the speed department. 



situation. A bill that would limit racing in any 
county in the State to thirty days in the year, and 
make auction and mutual pools the only system, of 
betting, with a certain percentage on the amount 
wagered to go to charity or the support of agricul- 
tural fairs, would meet with favor among the people. 
There would be strong opposition to it in certain cir- 
cles but with the united aid of the harness horsemen 
and others, there would be little trouble in making it 
a law. 



This will draw greater crowds to the fairs, and hence 
greatly help the fair associations financially." 



THE DEATH of Hon. William Ellsworth Greene, 
Superior Judge of Alameda County, California, which 
occurred in this city early Monday evening of this 
week, has removed from this earthly sphere one of 
the leading jurists of California, and one who had 
devoted much time and thought to the breeding of 
the trotting horse, a love for that noble animal having 
been acquired by him when a boy In the State of 
Maine, of which he was a naitve. Judge Greene was 
Superior Judge of Alameda County at the time of his 
death and had occupied a place on the bench there 
for twenty-five years. He was born in Farmington, 
Me., November 14. 183G. He was educated in the 
public schools and was graduated from Bowdoin Col- 
lege, one of New England's famous Institutions. In 
1863 he came to California and taught in the public 
schools of Stoctkon for a short time, following that 
experience by entering the legal profession. During 
the Presidential campaign of 1864 Judge Greene took 
an active part In this State, touring San Joaquin 
County for the re-election of Abraham Lincoln. From 
the birth of the Republican party he was an ardent 
partisan, although his subsequent elevation to the 
bench precluded much' further public effort in that 
direction. In 1865 he was eleeted to the Assembly 
from San Joaquin County and in the Legislature voted 
on the amendment to the constitution of the United 
States abolishing slavery. For two years afterward 
he practiced law and in 1863 took his seat on the 



HORSES SHOULD BE EDUCATED to meet an 
automobile on the road or elsewhere without fright. 
The devil wagons have come to stay, and the horse 
owner who is wise will see that his horses are accus- 
tomed to the noise and smell of the machines, and 
idoes not fear them in the daylight or when they are 
approaching him at night with headlights looking 
iike the glaring eyeballs of the fierce Numidian lion. 
The motors have come to stay and every intelligent 
horse breeder will recognize this fact and also the 
one that they have not nor will not lessen the de- 
mand for good horses. As horses in the city are of 
little value that are afraid of motor vehicles of any 
kind, so horses in the country will nut find ready sale 
If they are afraid of steam or electric cars or the 
benzine buggies. Electricity Is moving car lines all 
through the country where steam cars cannot go 
except at great expense, and the country horse, to 
be of value, must now be "city broke and fearless of 
all objects." The wise owner, who cares for his own 
safety and that of his family, or who expects to real- 
ize the worth of a horse when offering him for sale, 
will see that he Is made familiar with automobiles 
in all their various speeds, colors and sizes, as well 
as odoriferous variety. It Is the condition of their 
presence and not the theory of their being a nuisance 
that confronts the horse owner at the present time. 



I Ed Geers bred and still owns waiter D'rect 2:05-y,, 
and he Is thought to be faster than his famous sire. 
Direct Hal. which won more money in a single sea- 
son than any harness horse that ever raced. Going 
slow, Walter has a rolling, tumbling, nodding way of 
going thai makes one think he Is lame; but such Is 
not the case. Many of the best pacers have had the 
same characteristic. Joe Patchen, old Hal Pointer, 
Direct Hal and John M. were not the "oll-iii-the-can" 
sort, going slow; but, oh my. when they got straight- 
ened out, how they could slip along! 



Railroad tickets can be had at reduced rates. 



Winning speed is worth money. An offer of $30,000 
has been refused for Sadie Mac 2:06*4. 



Well. Brother Griffin, Sweet Marie "bears the ban- 
ner of recuperation" all right, doesn't she? 



Mr. Pickering of Pittsburg, owner of Dr. Strong 
2:06 refused an offer of $12,000 for him last week. 



Trainer Stlnson, who drives Sadie Mac 2.06 '4 in all 
her races, is a brother of Dr. J. C. Stinson of this 
city. 



A syndicate of Detroit horsemen made Ed Geers an 
offer of $20,000 for Walter Direct, but the silent man 
declined the offer. 



A finely matched pair of geldings 15.3 hands high 
Is advertised for sale by T. C. Cabney. The adver- 
tisement apears in this issue. 



Stiletto by Steinway, dam Nola by Nutwood, re- 
duced his record to 2:14% in the second heat of a race 
which he won in straight heats at Readville, Mass., 
August 5th. 



A. Mastin of Sacramento advertises two fine stal- 
lions for sale — John A. 2:12% and Guy Carlton, one 
of the best bred colts in America and paid up in the 
Occident Stake. 



A standard bred son of Mendocino is offered for 
sale at a reasonable figure. Weighs close to 1100 
pounds and has trotted in 2:18%. See M. M. Don- 
nelly's ad in this issue. 



A San Francisco man who owns a trotting mare 
has decided to call her Reciprocity. He says he has 
spent a lot of money to make her go, and she recipro- 
cates by making his money go. 



McKinney stallions are in demand more and more. 
A well-bred and fine individual by this great sire 
is advertised in our columns for sale at a low price 
by Dan Redmond at San Jose. 



All the open classes advertised by the Readville 
association have been declared off, but the regular 
stakes already closed will be decided. The meeting 
will only last two days, as poolselling is not to be 
permitted. 



One of the big events of the season 'will be a 
match race between Dr. Strong 2:06, and Tom Ax- 
worthy 2:07% for $5000 a side. The race is to take 
place at Pittsburg at a date to be set, and will be 
best three heats in five 



Nathan Straus of New York City has leased the 
property at Edgewood Park, Alexandria Bay, N. T.* 
formerly known as the Alexandria Bay Driving Park, 
from I. P. Lamson of Cleveland, O.. for a series of 
years, and will immediately have it put in shape by a 
professional track builder, after which he will take 
his horses from Brooklyn there. Mr. Strauss will join 
the National Trotting Association, and will conduct a 
series of meetings during the summer. 



Many temporary stalls are to be built at the new 
State Fair grounds at Sacramento to accommodate 
the live stock that will be exhibited during the fair, 
but these temporary quarters will be more comfort- 
able and more sanitary than those which housed live 
stock at the old grounds. 



The Eureka, Humboldt county, fair, will open 
September 13th and continue four days. A program 
of harness and running races has been provided, 
with purses ranging from $100 to $400. The Eureka 
Fair is one of the best attended fairs held In Cali- 
fornia. W. D. Lambert Is secretary, and will be 
pleased to furnish any information to parties address- 
ing him at Eureka. 

o 

All the Way From Pike. 

Thousands o[ the best friends of Absorblne reside In tho small 
towns and villages throughout this country. They are horsemen 
who layclalm to noneof that superiority of knowledge concerning 
horse remedies that many of the residents of our large cities 
effect. They don't believe that every testimonial that appears 
In tholr favorite horse paper was purchased with a price They 
know that Iho price of i. bottle of Absorblne Is no more than the 
veterinary would charge to just look at a horse and tell them what 
Is the matter. They like to get tho practical experience of cur- 
ing tho ailment thomselves Thoy get tho best results because 
they itso the medicine with tholr own hands and they use It »-oo- 
nomloally and follow directions faithfully. Here Is a Fpeclmen 
letter from one of this class of people: 

Somerset, Pike Co., Miss., July 3, 1902. 
W W Young. Springfield, Mass 

Dear Sir: — I used your Absorblne about three years ago on my 
horse for bog spavin and found It did everything you claimed for 
ft, I must admit that. I was surprised at the results, as no one 
could ever tell now wLlch leg was hurt. Yours truly, 

J. B. R.YAS. 

Absorblne $2 por bottle, express prepaid. 

Address W. F.. YOUNG, P. D F., Springfield, Mass. 



New Mexico Pleased With Caustic Balsam. 

FAi.tviEW, N. M., Jan. 28, 1905. 
The Lawrence-Williams Co , Cleveland. O. 

Our Mr. Jacob M. Blun has used Uombault's Caustic Balsam 
on a horse that had sweeny of long standing, with excellent 
results. Blun Bros. 



4 



(The gveebet mib grpirctem«*t 



[August 12, 1CO6 



Notes and News, m 



They are already calling Sadie Mac the Sweet 

Marie of 1005. 

An offer of $15,000 is said to have been refused for 
Tom Axworthy 2:07 recently. 

Ed Geer's horses won $6425 at Detroit, he being 
the leading money winner of the meeting. 

There will be one harness race and three running 
races each day at the Spokane, Wash., fair. 



Burnut, a bay gelding by Neernut 2:12'/4. was sec- 
ond every heat in a. race at Kalamazoo last week. 
The best time was 2:19. 

Only two of the pacers starting in this year's 
Chamber of Commerce stake wore hopples and both 
were outside the money. 

Stanley Dillon 2:07%, winner of the 1904 M. & M.. 
will be used for road driving in the future by his 
owner, J. H. Brown of Detroit. 



Bonnie Russell 2:10% is good this year. He worked 
a mile at Readville two weeks ago In 2:10%, the last 
quarter of the mile in 31% seconds. 



Delilah 2:14 is the fastest three-year-old pacer, and 
Ambush 2: 14V* the fastest three-year-old trotter of 
the year. Both are by Zolock 2:05%. 



Sadie Mac 2:06% is the fastest trotter ever bred by 
the late J. Malcom Forbes. She is by Peter the Great 
2:07%, dam Fanella 2:13, by Arion 2:07%. 



The practice is pretty general over east and through 
the middle west to give a horse that lowers the track 
record an extra prize of from $25 to $100. 



Chas. DeRyder thinks Judge Green 2:09 will not be 
able to race again. Entirely sound, this horse should 
have trotted to a record of 2:06 or better. 



Schwartz & Chase have secured the betting privi- 
leges for the Breeders' meeting at Santa Rosa. Only 
auction pools and mutual pools will be sold. 



El Milagro 2.11V4 by McKinney, won the first heat 
of the 2:12 trot at Readville. August 2d. and was only 
beaten a. head in 2:12% by Lady Gail Hamilton in the 
second heat. 



Glenwood M. 2:08%. a winner at Detroit, is de- 
scribed as a strikingly handsome horse of the coach 
type. He promises to be one of the sensational trot- 
ters of the year. 



The gray gelding Jim Ferry was started at the 
driving club matinee at Denver July 22d against the 
track record for a half mile this year, Which was 1:10. 
He made it In 1:03%. 



I lozema n opens first among the Montana meetings 
and a good meeting is promised. Reports from there 
say that a number of horses are in trailing and that 
everybody is feeling right for the fall contests. 



The Great Western Circuit opened at Freeport. 111., 
last week. Davenport, Iowa, comes next, and then 
the towns of Decatur, Galesburg, Hamline. Milwaukee. 
Libert yvllle and Springfield will follow in the order 
named. 



Mr. Isaac Morehouse intends starting his fast trot- 
ter Silver Bow for a record during the Santa, Rosa 
meeting. This horse should have had a record below 
2:10, but a bad leg has made it impossible to /ace 
him this year. 



Rey del Diablo has been racing way across the 
continent at Saugus, Mass. He started in the 2:12. 
pace there July 26th, and got fourth money. The 
race was won by Ginger in straight heats, the best 
time being 2:11%. 



The three-year-olds will furnish some great racing 
at Santa Rosa next week. The Breeders' Futurity is 
one of the big features of the California Circuit every 
summer and is looked forward to with great interest 
by the breeders of harness horses. 



California should have two $5000 stakes every year — 
one for trotters and one for pacers. If there were a 
good trotting track in San Francisco or Oakland, two 
such stakes could be given, and they would do much 
to keep up the interest in harness horses. 



The Pacific Slope Stakes, $1500 for 2:20 class pacers 
will be the feature of the day at Santa Rosa next 
Wednesday, when the Breeders' meeting will open. 
The class of the race by this year's form are Glen. 
Nellie R., Fearnot. Bessie Barnes and Argyle. 



A song of bygone generations repri. ched the 
French with calling their mothers "mares ' and all 
their daughters "fillies," and it is easy to imagine that 
"filly" is connected with "fille " As a matter of (Bet. 
the word "filly" is of Scandinavian origin and is really 
a diminutive of "foal." Shakespeare makes Puck dis- 
guise himself in "likeness of a filly foal." "Mare" is 
the Anglo-Saxon "mere," feminine of "mearh." a 
horse, a trace of which remains in "marshal," which 
properly signifies master of the horse. 



The Broncho, Charlie Dean's pacing mare by Storm- 
cliff, is hot stuff, and is winning very fast races on the 
half mile tracks this year for little money. Last week 
she won at Streator, Illinois, in straight heats in 
2:06%. 2:07%, and 2:07%. The purse was only $300. 



The well known drivers, Al Thomas, Ed Geers, W. 
L. Snow and Charley DeRyder, who raced at Detroit, 
all spoke in praise of the three-heat plan under which 
the races were contested. The old followers of the 
circuit who patronize the pool box did not . like it, 
however. 



Robert Lee, the Indiana pacer by Gene Lee, out of 
an untraced dam, took a record of 2:06% in the 
fourth heat of a race at Kalamazoo, August 2d. Gene 
Lee is a son of Gambetta Wilkes, the son of George 
Wilkes that is putting so many new ones in the list 
in recent years. 



Adam G 2:14% is entered in the 2:27 class trot at 
Santa Rosa, which is the first race on the program 
of Wednesday, the opening day of the meeting. He 
will be driven by J. W. Zibbell. father of Willard 
Zihhell, who trained the horse and drove him to his 
record at Los Angeles. 



Racing associations in New York last year paid 
$190,253 to the State, which is five per cent of the 
gross receipts during the season. In Illinois, Mis- 
souri. California and other states that have no law 
regulating betting, the State treasuries get nothing 
from the racing associations. 



Directe, a brown three-year-old filly by Direct 
2:05% out of Bessie R 2:25% by France, recently 
trotted a mile over the Empire track, driven by John 
Daly, in 2.15%. the last half in 1:04%. This (illy is 
owned by Mr. F. T. Steinway of New York, and is 
entered in the Kentucky Futurity. 



Mack Mack beat 2:10 at Detroit in the second heat 
of the 2:12 trot won by Sadie Mac in 2:08% The 
McKinney gelding was second in that heat, about 
three lengths back. The eastern horsemen say he will 
get a record of 2:10 or better the first time he wins a 
heat. 



Mr. A. B. Gwathmey will match his gelding Tiver- 
ton 2:04% against any trotter in the world for $10,000 
a side, and he don't bar Lou Dillon, Major Delmar or 
Sweet Marie. Mr. Gwathmey has a great trotter, one 
of the fastest ever hooked up, but the trotter's speed 
cannot equal his owner's faith and gameness. 



The trotting stallion Starboul by StambouT 2:07%, 
owned by C. W H. Doublet - , Warren, 111., dropped dead 
recently from heart disease. He was bred by the late 
L. J. Rose and foaled the property of Owens Bros, 
of Fresno. His dam was Madam Harding by Over- 
land, son of Bald Chief, second dam Kate Taber by 
Mambrino Messenger. 



I! is very likely that a fair and race meeting will be 
held during the latter part of September at the Con- 
cord, Contra Costa county, track. The parties who 
hold a mortgage on the property are negotiating for 
its purchase, and their intention is to make manv im- 
provements in the buildings, etc. should the grounds 
come into their possession. 

Bert Horton, the brown pacing gelding owned hy a 
man named Oorbett. is racing through the North Da- 
kota circuit under the name of Brett, and winning 
about everything he goes after. He was entered in 
some of the Montana races last year, but some of 
the boys got on to him and ho was not started. It 
Vnav be that Brett is the notorious Fred Wilton 
2:09%. mentioned elsewhere in this issue. 



.1. M. Herbert of Denver, owns a filly sired by Wal- 
ter Direct 2:05%, winner of this year's Chamber of 
Commerce stake. Walter Direct served a few mares 
before he was put in training and Mr. Herbert was 
one of the fortunate ones to send a mare to him The 
mare is by Directly 2:03% and her dam by Star 
Pointer 1.59%,. The filly is pacing bred with a ven- 
geance. 



By winning the Chamber of Commerce Slakes with 
Walter Direct, (leers made a number of records. He 
is the only driver who has won the stake three times. 
Fach time he won he made a new record for the stake. 
The record up to 1902 was 2:08%; this he reduced to 
2:06% when he won with Direct Hal. the sire of this 
year's winner. With Baron Grattan last year he re- 
duced the record to 2:06%, and on July 24 to 2:05% 
with Walter Direct. 



Some months ago Sam Casto, the well-known Ore- 
gon trainer and horseman, sued Mrs. Emma Murray 
for the possession of the stallion Diablo 2:09%, which 
he claimed he was entitled to under a lease. The 
County Court wherein the suit was commenced de- 
cided in favor of Mrs. Murray. Mr. Casto's lawyers 
took an appeal to the Supreme Court, which last 
month handed down a decision affirming the judgment 
of the lower tribunal. Diablo is now at Fresno. 



It is proposed by the directors of the California 
State Agricultural Society to sow the infield at the 
track in alfalfa. If a good stand is secured next 
spring, the soft green of the clover will be very 
restful to the eye during the bright sunny after- 
noons of September when the races are held, and 
will add much to the attractiveness of the new fair 
grounds, as well as furnishing much feed for show 
stock. 



Auget Baron, the very fast gelding by Baron Wilkes 
out of Lady Wilton, has been taken to the home of his 
owner, I. Morehouse of Milpitas. and turned out. This 
gelding dotted very fast in his work at San Jose 
this year, but received an injury in the way of a 
sprain Or something similar, and will not start this 
year. Since Mr. Morehouse took him home he has 
been improving, and it is to be hoped he will entirely 
recover, as he Is the promise of a 2:10 horse. 



Vision SlQS, the hay gelding by Vanquish, whose 
picture adorns our title page this week, is an entry 
in the 2:13 class pace which is on the program for 
the opening day of the Breeders' meeting at Santa 
Rosa His record of 2:09% was made at Los Angeles 
last month, where he won one race and was second 
in another. He is in Fred Ward's string and is the 
first 2:10 performer bred by the Witch Hazel Stock 
Farm, owned by Van De Lashmut of Portland, Ore. 



The track at the new State Fair grounds at Sacra- 
mento has been completed. It was constructed under 
the supervision of A. M. Allen, who laid out the Tan- 
foran. Oakland, Ingleside and Ascot Park tracks, and 
is considered the leading race track builder in Amer- 
ica. William Fieldwick. superintendent of .the Cali- 
fornia Jockey Club, will put the new track in shape 
for the races to be held fair week, which will begin 
September 2d The soil of the track is yellow clay, 
the very best for the purpose, and trotters and pacers 
should go very fast over it if it is properly worked. 



At tlie conclusion of the Chamber of Commerce 
Walter Direct was presented with a superb floral 
trophy by the Detroit Association, while both the 
horse and Geers received ovations from the crowd. 
The victory was especially popular on account of Wal- 
ter Direct being the personal property of Geers him- 
self. The "Silent Man" has now won the C. of C. 
in three of the last four renewals. Last year he 
piloted Baron Grattan, and in 1902 he was behind Di- 
rect Hal, who is the sire of Walter Direct. Direct 
Hal never lost a race that season, and it is predicted 
that the son will eclipse the record of the sire Geers 
considers him a better horse, and so do all the critics. 



Mrs. L. J. Hastings of Los Angeles offers her 
grandly bred stallion Sky Pointer Jr. for sale. This 
horse is by Sky Pointer, an own brother to the for- 
mer champion Star Pointer 1:59%, and his dam is 
the McKinney mare Juliet D. 2:13%, dam of last 
year's four-year-old champion, Irish 2:08%. Sky 
Pointer died while a young horse and left but few 
colts. One of his get. Sally Pointer, took a record of 
2:13% recently on one of the eastern tracks and is 
expected to lower this mark several seconds before 
the year is out. Sky Pointer Jr. is a handsome stal- 
lion and his colts are a very promising lot He will 
be sold reasonable. See advertisement. 



The law which provided an appropriation for the 
California State Fair prohibits the directors from 
permitting betting or gambling of any kind on the 
State Fair grounds. It is said that parties have se- 
cured a place on the opposite side of the road from 
the main entrance ami will sell pools and make books 
on the result of all the races. All the patrons of the 
fair who desire to bet will have to do will be to secure 
a return check and step across the street, where they 
can back the horses to their hearts' content. There 
are more ways than one to remove the external mem- 
branous integument from a feline. 



Can any horse named in the 2:09 pace make Zolock 
beat his record of 2.05% to win at Santa Rosa? This 
question is asked every day where California horse- 
men meet. If Daedalion is all right, the first heat will 
he faster than 2:06, and Kelly Briggs is known to be 
able to beat 2:07 three t'mes when he is fit. Rita 
H. can beat any horse that can't show better than 
2:09 three times, while Miss Idaho must be reckoned 
with where the heats are around 2: OS. It will be a 
horse race at all events, and with good day and track 
Zolock will have to stretch his neck to win. This 
race will be paced on Friday, the third day of the 
meeting. 



The noted ringer Fred Wilton 2:09% that has per- 
formed and been expelled under the names of Ornus. 
Finley Ross. Frank Derby, Rock Wilkes, Brooklyn 
Boy, Noah R., Elzaged. Wilkes Jim, Combine, etc., 
tried to start at Salt Lake City recently under the 
name of Ben J., but was recognized by Magnus Flaws, 
who was acting as presiding judge. The horse was 
in charge of a driver by the name of Bob Crawford, 
who hails from Oklahoma, and they are supposed to 
be heading for the Pacific Coast. The noted ringer is 
a pacer, a bay or brown gelding, nine years old. stands 
about fifteen hands high, has no white marks, goes in 
hopples, is smooth gaited, and can pace close to or 
better than his record; in summer bleaches out to a 
light bay. Horsemen and managers of meetings 
should keep their eyes open for this fellow. 



There is a great deal of ink wasted every year over 
the suggestion of new plans on which to race harness 
horses, but the old three-in-five seems to best suit 
those who make entries, and it is the entrance money 
that makes harness racing go. Nearly all the asso- 
ciations Comprising the Grand Circuit get more than 
enough entrance money to pay their purses, and the 
gate receipts and other resources are large enough 
to pay a profit to the promoters. It Is all very well 
for those who are not horsemen to talk about short- 
ening races, and giving the public quick action, but 
the man who puts up $500 for the privilege of starting 
in a $10,000 purse agianst a big field of horses, likes 
to have as many chances as possible to get. some of 
the money, and naturally the entries fall off when any 
conditions are made that will lessen the number of 
heats to three In every race. 



August 12, 1905] 



b 



|| OTHER PEOPLE'S OPINIONS. || 

"Volunteer" in Horse Review: Four great trotters 
beat 2:10 at the meeting. Dr. Strong took a record of 
2:06, Sadie Mac one of 2:06%, Tom Axworthy one of 
2:07 and Glenwood M. one of 2:0S%. Among these it 
was the performance of Sadie Mac that was most im- 
pressive. She scored so fast that it was hard for the 
others to get up with her, and when the word was 
given she burst away at a 2:02 gait and took the 
track in an instant — and it was all over. She came 
home in 2.06% with her head swinging and her ears 
pricked and it seemed impossible at first that the mile 
could be so fast so easily was it trotted. From her 
manner of finishing — she literally romped all the last 
eighth — it was not illogical to believe that a mile in 
2:05 would not have been beyond her. 

The five-year-old daughter of Peter the Great 2:07% 
is, veritably, a trotting wonder. Her unbeaten three- 
year-old career stamped her such, but she is today, 
aside from her matureness in point of speed, a far 
superior trotting machine. It must be placed une- 
quivocally to Harry Stinson's credit that he has im- 
proved her in every way. As a three-year-old she 
had a sort of stubby-going gait that led more than 
one critic to say that she would not train on to the 
low notch that others predicted. Stinson has eradi- 
cated this. She is still low-headed and low-gaited — 
but there is, at the same time, a snap and elasticity 
about her action that is new. She also takes more 
Interest in the game. She was as staid as a brood 
mare in former days. Now she is full of gimp, her 
eyes flash, her ears play back and forth in the liveli- 
est possible fashion, she is not only willing, but 
eager. And bodily she looks good enough to eat. 
She was always robust, with a big place for her din- 
ner. Now she caries a lot of flesh, but it is hard and 
firm, and she sweats out as clear as spring water. The 
good horsemen simply stared, open-mouthed, at that 
2:06% heat and remarked, with a sort of comical 
unanimity: "There is the Sweet Marie of 1905." 

Ever since her owner. Miss Wilks of the Cruick- 
ston Park Farm, at Gait, Ont., began investing so lib- 
erally in trotters, two years ago, every one has been 
hoping to see her get a "crackerjack." In Sadie Mac 
she has surely got one. 



H. M. Hanna. president of the Cleveland Driving 
Park Company, says': "About September 1, when I 
have returned from my vacation, I will call a meeting 
of the board of directors to discuss future plans. The 
situation will be carefully gone over, including the 
advisability of again asking the legislature for a law 
l>ermitting pool selling for a few days of the year 
on the grounds of the racing track companies: Just 
what will be decided on I can not say, nor have I 
made up my mind yet as to just what will be best for 
the company to do; whatever is done will be sub- 
mitted to the stockholders for a vote. If it is decided 
to ask for another pool selling law, the horsemen of 
the State will aid us in pushing the legislation. Gov- 
ernor Herrick, I believe, will be defeated this fall, 
not only through the influence of horsemen, but 
through the influence of other interests. The legis- 
lature will represent the people as it did two years 
ago. Then we had a two-to-one majority on the 
pool bill in the house, and a safe majority in the sen- 
ate. John M. Patison, the Democratic candidate, who 
drill be elected, I consider a safe man, and I do not 
think that he will veto any pool selling bill that can 
be gotten through the legislature, notwithstanding 
his alliance with the temperance people. As the peo- 
ple will demand a pool selling bill, and Pattison will 
recognize the wishes of the people, there is still hope 
for us." 



Spirit of the West: The horse "man's best friend" 
has been a great factor in the growth of civilization 
in all nations, as far back as the history of man can 
be traced. likewise, the horse has always been the 
most important factor in the growth and develop- 
ment of commercial life in all countries. Many inven- 
tions the past half century, such as railroads and 
new and improved farm machinery, has not in the least 
diminished the necessity of increasing the horse 
product of the country. In fact, at no time within the 
past twenty-five years has the production of horses 
been as remunerative to the producer as at the present 
time. About fifteen years ago, when the bicycle man- 
ufacturers reaped a rich harvest, and, in due time, 
tost millions of dollars on account of the discarding 
if the bicycle, the daily newspapers and some of the 
ieading magazines were filled with articles on the 
"passing of the horse." But the noble horse did not 
pass out of use. Instead, he continued to move in good 
society, wore tailor-made wearing apparel and dined 
on pedigreed oats, corn and hay. After the bicycle 
craze died away, the manufacturers of the lifeless 
two-wheeled vehicle turned their attention to the au- 
tomobile, and, like the bicycle, they have spent mil- 
lions in manufacturing and advertising and have suc- 
ceeded in creating no small amount of enthusiasm 
and many sales. t However, already in the want and 
for sale columns of all the leading daily papers may 
be found any day 'ads" offering for sale $750 autos at 
"half price," including a half barrel of gasoline, or a 
meal ticket to pay for three feeds at the nearest elec- 
tric light plant where storage batteries are groomed 
for a forty-mile drive. When the bicycle craze was at 
its zenith city municipalities were obliged to pass 
stringent laws to govern the speed of the bicyclers and 
to protect the life of men, women and children. The 
same necessity obtains today in cities due to the 
reckless auto drivers. The auto has even Invaded tlx' 
rural districts and 1 the farmers are crying for State 
legislation to regulate the machines upon the public 



highways. Spirit of the West's candid opinion is that 
before the State has time to legislate the auto craze 
will have dropped out of sight just as the bicycle 
craze did. Old Dobbin need not fear that his useful- 
ness is over, or that he will ever fall in disfavor or 
disuse. While the inventive genius of the bicycle and 
the auto have succeeded in producing machines that 
touch the fancy and the pocketbooks of a limited num- 
ber of people, the producer of horses has kept right 
on improving the blood, the type, quality and class of 
his products, totally oblivious to the inroads of a few 
machines that in due time will augment heaps of scrap 
iron that line the byways in all cities and towns. 

Trotter and Pacer: The need of a thoroughly well 
fused and disciplined organization of horsemen was 
probably never so kenly felt in this coutnry as at the 
present time. A militant sentiment of opposition to 
the race tracks seems to be abroad, and it bids fair 
unless checked to place an interdiction upon the sport 
in every State in the Union. The suppression of the 
speculative feature of the sport is, of course, the thing 
aimed at, and it is of no consequence w r hatever to a 
class of narrow people whose own interests are not 
jeopardized to know that speculation is an Indis- 
pensable adjunct of horse racing, without which it 
could not exist except in the limitedi connection with 
CCiinty fairs. A thousand good and enthusiastic- 
horsemen have wished that horse racing might be 
maintained without betting and hardly any of them 
would hesitate to make the sacrifice so far as their 
own personal inclinations or desires are concerned, 
but there has never yet been a man of any sense 
who has stood up and maintained that horse racing, 
as an independent and exclusive diversion, can be con- 
ducted without pool selling, except at a pecuniary 
sacrifice. This just as much applies to the operation 
of trotting as running tracks. So far as an utter de- 
pendence upon this auxiliary to the sport is concerned, 
the trotters are no better off than the thoroughbreds. 
The people who are willing to destroy the whole fab- 
ric of racing for the purpose of striking at a feature 
of it which under certain circumstances may be pro- 
ductive of evil, are very intolerant and entirely un- 
amenable to reason. They are not to be denied the 
possession of a clean and lofty motive, but they are 
utterly without discretion or discrimination. They do 
not realize that their efforts, if successful, have a 
deeper significance than the mere closing of trac ks. 
They imagine that the only serious consequence of 
closing the tracks will be to deprive a few trainers 
and drivers, with their stable dependents, of an oc- 
cupation, while as a matter of truth that result would 
be only one of the least of the evils which would fol- 
low their action. The race tracks are the mainstay 
and support of the breeders of the United States, 
whose business represents an enormous investment, 
and whose efforts have given this country a distinc- 
tion possessed by no other nation in the world. There 
is justification for the pool selling that is necessary 
to keep the tracks in operation, in the prosperity and 
continued growth of the vast breeding industry, and 
if the matter could be presented to the law-makers 
of every State in this light by an organization truly 
representative of the important interests behind it, 
and directed with moderation of demand and wisdom 
of counsel, there is little doubt that it would receive 
consideration. But such an organization is something 
that has never existed and probably never will. There 
are numbers and strength in the ranks of the horse- 
men, but there are no leaders capable of fusing the 
mass into a homogenous organization for concerted 
effort. 

o v 

THE GAITS OF THE SADDLE HORSE. 



Concerning the gaits there is much misunderstand- 
ing, and some dispute. All horsemen know the walk 
and the trot, but not all' can differentiate a canter 
from a gallop. And when it comes to the rack and 
the slow gaits, most horsemen class them all as 
"easy gaits" and let it go at that. As in many other 
instances in live stock matters where a little learning 
is a dangerous thing, there is plenty of debate over the 
different gaits and we are sometimes asked to settle 
disputes concerning them. A bit of eye education is 
usually necessary; that is, an illustration of the gaits 
will give a clearer understanding than a description 
of them. Here is a sample call for information of this 
character: 

"What are the different gaits of a saddle horse? 
Describe the movements of the feet, in rotation to 
each other, in the different gaits. Give some of the 
details in training a saddle horse such as bridle, bits, 
reins." 

The natural gaits of a horse are the walk, trot and 
gallop or run. Artiflcally. that is by education, the 
gallop is made into a canter, which is a gait per- 
formed by practically the same movement of the legs, 
but slower, more restrained and easier to ride. We 
then have one kind of a saddle horse called the walk- 
trot-canter or plain-gaited horse. This horse suits 
a lot of people primarily because they do not know any 
other gait; secondarily because they are imitators of 
the English fashion of riding, and lastly, and leastly, 
because they do not like other educated gaits which 
are easier on the rider. 

These easier gaits are the running walk and t hfl 
rack. The latter is also called single-foot. Inasmuch 
as In this gait each foot has a. separate contact on 
the ground, no two of them striking It at the same 
time, as In the trot and pace. But the official name 
of this gait is the rack, and it should be used. The 
running walk Is called a slow gait, and there are two 
other gaits allied to it. the slow pace and the fox- 
trot. The slow pace is also sometimes called the step- 
ping pace. 

The name running walk defines the gait accurately 
and at once Identifies it to the understanding. It is 
faster than a. flat-foot walk, and is produced by ;i 



movement of the legs more rapid than in a walk but 
in about the same rhythm. That Is, each foot strikes 
the ground independently of the other. Most horses 
going the running walk bob or nod their heads and 
some of them even flop their ears in rhythm with their 
footfalls. It is an all-day gait, easy alike to the horse 
and the rider, and it covers ground at an astonishing 
fashion for its apparent speed. It is taught by urging 
a horse out of the walk but restraining him from a 
trot. The slow pace is a somewhat similar movement 
but borders more on the sldewheel gait or lateral pace, 
in which the two feet on one side of a horse strike 
the ground at the same instant. The true pace, how- 
ever, is in no sense a saddle gait. It is rough and un- 
comfortable. A rider can not rise to it and save him- 
self, as in a trot, and it is positively the worst gait 
a saddle horse can possess. In the slow pace this side- 
wheel motion is slightly modified so that the Impact 
on the ground of the two feet on a side is broken, thus 
avoiding the rolling motion of the harness pace. The 
slow pace is a very comfortable gait, and is very 
showy, especially when a horse throws just a bit of 
knee action into it. It has grown common in the show 
ring during recent years, as saddle horse trainers 
appreciate its catchy qualities and endeavor to teach 
their horses to go this gait. The best saddle horse 
men, however, do not look on it with favor as it is so 
easily corrupted into the abominable side-wheel pace, 
which ruins a saddle horse for comfortable and satis- 
factory work. Unless a rider is careful his mount may 
almost imperceptibly degenerate from a distinct and 
correct slow pace into a plainly-defined pace. The fox 
trot is a slow trot or a jog-trot. It is a rather pe- 
culiar gait and not so desirable as the running walk 
or the slow pace. Some horses can not acquire either 
of these two gaits and so their trainers pull them 
down into a very slow trot and seek to pass that gait 
off as a fox-trot. It is a broken-time gait in a meas- 
ure, somewhat easier than a pure trot. 

The trot is the diagonal gait. The off fore foot and 
the near hind foot strike the ground at the same 
instant and the horse bounds off them to hit the 
ground again with the near fore and the off hind. 
This gives a two-beat gait. The impact of the feet 
on the ground is one, two, one, two. The pace is 
the lateral gait. The off fore and off hind foot hit the 
ground at the same interval, and the other pair on the 
near side follow. Thid is also a two-beat gait. The 
rack is a four-beat gait. Each foot hits the ground 
at a separate interval in a one, two, three, four beat. 
The rack can be distinguished by ear as far as the 
footfalls of the horse may be heard; each foot rings 
clear its own note on the hard ground. 

In teaching the rack the horse is forced forward 
by the spur and restrained by the curb. His diagonal 
gait is thereby broken up and he flies into a four- 
beat gait. The rack is easy for the rider, hard for the 
horse. It is a showy gait and is performed at great 
speed sometimes. The trainer who has a fast-racking 
horse will generally keep him on that gait in the 
show ring, hoping to dazzle the judge by the flashi- 
ness of the performance. Unfortunately this trick 
succeeds many times, as some judges are too ignorant 
or too unbalanced to demand the other requisites of 
a saddle horse. Many a horse has racked his way to 
fame through the complacency of half-baked judges 
who proceed in the apparent belief that the rack is 
the only accomplishment demanded of a saddle horse. 

The five gaits recognized by the American Saddle 
Horse Breeders' Association are the walk, trot, can- 
ter, rack and the running walk, or slow pace, or fox- 
trot. Either one of these three slow gaits will an- 
swer. Some horses can go only one of them, some c an 
show them all. When a horse can show these five 
gaits he is called a gaited horse. 

Saddle horses are differentiated by their gaits into 
two classes — the walk-trot-canter horse and the 
gaited horse. The gaited horse can do all that the 
walk-trot horse can do and more. It is far easier to 
finish up a three-gaited horse than a five-gaited 
horse, and saddle horse educators have not been dis- 
pleased at the growing demand for three-gal ted 
horses, as it much cheaper to furnish them. 

The mouth of a saddle horse should first be made 
on a Snaffle bit. He will walk and trot on the 
snaffle, he will rack and canter on the curb. The 
gaited horse is usually ridden with curb bit and 
single-rein, and the walk-trot-canter horse is usu- 
ally ridden with bit and bridoon — that is the double 
bit or curb and snaffle with a pair of reins for each 
bit. It is easier to communicate through a horse's 
mouth by the use of the curb and the snaffle and 
two pairs of reins — and communication with a sad- 
dle horse should largely be through the mouth, as- 
sisted by the leg and heel. — Breeders' Gazette. 

o '' 

At a meeting held at Columbia, Missouri, last month 
W, < ). Foote was present with his string, and noticed 
in i he printed list that his pacer Ed C. was not down 
in the printed list as being entered in the 2:35 pace. 
He slated the fact to the program man, and the latter 
printed Ed C.'s name on the program among the 
starters In the 2.35 class. The secretary did not notice 
it, and Foote started the horse and won in straight 
heats, getting a mark of 2:16% for him. After the 
race the driver of the second horse started an In- 
vestigation with the result that it was ascertained 
Ed C. was not entered In the 2:35 but the 2:25 class| 
So the owner of the second horse got Hrst money and 
no record for his horse, while Eoote got no money 
but a record for his. 



Admiral Dewey, the brown stallion by Bingen 
2:06%, dam the famous Nancy Hanks 2:04, surprised 
the horsemen at Readville the day that Sweet Marie 
beat Tiverton, by trotting to a record of 2:09% in a 
trial against time. Admiral Dewey took a record of 
2: 14', 4 as a three-year-old in 1901. He was put in 
training again this year, but had been but one mile 
better than 2:20 prior, to his Readville performance. 



6 



[AUGCST 12, 1905 



FAST RACING AT BUFFALO. 



Grand Circuit Meeting Largely Attended and 
Many Records Lowered. 

BUFFALO, August 7. — Grand Circuit racing started 
in here to-day after a week of idleness for the horses 
at Cleveland. The excellent laws of New York State, 
under which all race meetings are held here, have 
mada harness racing very popular with the people 
and the attendance to-day was close to ten thousand. 

The 2:08 pace, for a stake of $5,000, was the opening 
race of the program and an even dozen horses scored 
for the word. Miss Willamont was the favorite, but 
the race went to Knapsack McCarthy's entry Ethel 
Mc, after the Canadian horse Geary had taken the 
first heat. The Pacific Coast horses Bolivar and 
Oregon Maid were starters in this race, but were back 
In the ruck most of the time. Bob, a handsome little 
gelding by Allie Wilkes, dropped dead in the first 
heat. 

The three-year-old trotters put up an excellent and 
a fast race for the 01,000 Liquid Veneer stake. Susie 
N. by Moko won the second heat in 2:13%, and the 
first and third heats went to Katherine L. by Liberty 
Chimes in 2:14% and 2:15. The Phantom, East View 
Farm's $10,000 colt, was last the first heat and dis- 
tanced in the second. 

Angle, winner of the M. & M. at Detroit, was the 
favorite for the 2:17 trot at $100 to $70 for the field 
of ten horses in which were Geers' Clarita W., Swift 
B. ( Grattan Boy, Fred Direct, and other good ones. 
Angle was not steady and Clarita W. made it three 
straight, with but one heat faster than 2:10. Swift B. 
got second money by being second in the first tw r o 
heats and third in the last. The fast but erratic 
Helen Norte was distanced in the first heat. The 
summaries. 

Pacing, 2:08 class, purse faOOO. 

Ethel Mc, ch. m., by Jersey Wilkes (McCarthy) 8 11 

Geary, ch. h., by Five Points (James) 18 3 

Donn Garr, blk g (Clark) 2 6 2 

Shylock, b. g (McMahon) 4 2 5 

Edwin C b. g ;...(W. Laird) 5 3 7 

Miss W'illimont, b. m (Snow) 3 11 6 

Jubilee, blk. g (Croy) 7 4 9 

Bolivar, b. g (De Kyder) 11 10 4 

Oregon Maid, br. m (Helman) 9 5 8 

Elmwood, br.-g (H. Snyder) 6 11 10 

Bald Hornet, s. g (Jolly) 10 9 d 

Baron Rogers, br. g (P.. Marvin) 12 7 d 

Bob, ch. g. (dropped dead in first heat). 
, Time — 2:06%, 2.09%, 2:08%. 

Trotting, three-year-old, purse $1000. 
Katherine L.. b. f„ by Liberty Chimes (Stinson) 12 1 

Susie N., b. f.. by Moko (Murphy) 3 12 

Bervaldo, b. c (Andrews) 2 3 3 

Miss Adbell, b. f (L. McDonald) 4 d 

The Phantom, blk. c (De Ryder) 5 d 

Time— 2:14%. 2:13%, 2:15. 

Trotting, 2:17 class, purse $2000. 

Clarita W.. ch. m.. by Grattan (Geers) 111 

Swift B., b. g (L. McDonald 2 2 3 

Angle, ch. m (Saunders) 8 6 2 

Grattan Boy Jr. (Clark) 3 5 4 

Miss Kinney, b. m (Andrews) 7 3 6 

Miss Rosedale. ch. m (Brawley) 5 4 5 

Fred Direct, blk. g (De Ryder) 4 8 7 

IOmma Hoyt, b. m (Stinson) 9 9 8 

Austin Boy, b. g (Valentine) 6 7 dr 

Helen Norte, b. m (Rutherford) d 

Missinlaw, br. m (Curry) d 

Time — 2:09%, 2:12%, 2:14. 
Tuesday, Second Day. 

The $10,000 Empire State Stake for 2:10 trotters 
was the big feature of the second day, and Peter the 
Great's handsome daughter Sadie Mac won handily 
in three straight heats, all below 2:10, while the Cali- 
fornia bred mare Zephyr by Zombro out of Zolock's 
dam took second money and trotted all her heats in 
2:10 or better. Next to Sadie Mac, Zephyr is doubt- 
less the highest class mare that is starting in the 2:10 
classes this year, and her record of 2:11 will be low- 
ered two or three seconds before the season is over. 
Mamie R. and Morosco were starters in this race but 
were outside the money, but beat the fast mare Grace 
Bond at that. Bonnie Russell was up third In the 
last heat, and is due to lower his record of 2:10% 
before long. 

In the 2:09 pace there was a field of fast ones, the 
Allerton horse Allerson winning three heats in very 
fast time, the slowest mile being 2:06%. The Mon- 
terey horse Irish 2:08% was third in the last heat of 
this race and Billy Red's sister Josie was third and 
fourth respectively in the other two, getting fourth 
money. 

In the 2.24 class trot Getaway made a good show- 
ing, being second in one heat and earning third money. 
All the heats were under 2:15, the second being in 
2:10%. Dncle Charley Cahill's mare Sister Colette, 
an own sister to Charley Herr 2:07, won second money 
and trotted a good game race. Brilliant Girl was dis- 
tanced the first heat. The summaries: 

Pacing, 2:09 class, purse $1000. 

Allerson, gr. h. by Allerton (Brady) 111 

Directum Miller, br. h (Mlllan) 5 2 2 

Peruna, b. g (Murphy) 2 5 3 

Josie, b. m (De Ryder) 4 3 4 

Irish, eh g (A. Thomas) 3 4 6 

Lady Bellbrook, b m ( Snyder 6 6 5 

Stein, b. g (Geers) 7 7 d 

Time — '2.06%, 2:05%. 2:06%. 

Trotting, 2:10' class. Empire State Stake. $10,000. 

Sadie Mac, b. m. by Peter the Great (Stinson) 111 

Zephyr, b. m. by Zombro (Geers) 3 2 2 

Miss Gay. b. m (A. P. McDonald) 2 4 7 

Brownie Wilton, b. h (Saunders) 4 3 5 

Bonnie Russell, b. h (Howell) 9 8 3 

Gray Gem, r. g (W. B. McDonald) 6 5 4 

Mamie R.. b. m (De Ryder) 7 7 6 

Morosco, br. g (Helman) 7 7 6 

Time — 2:08%, 2:08%, 2:09%. 

Pacing, three-year-olds, purse $1000. 

Mary Aldous, blk m. by Roy Wilkes. .. (Snow) 2 11 

Madam Direct, blk m (De Ryder) 12 2 

Time— 2:19%, 2:13%, 2:16. 



Trotting, 2:24 class, purse $1000. 

Hardwood, blk. g. bv Gamwood .... (Saunders) 111 

Sister Colette, b. m (Cahill) 3 2 3 

Getaway, ch. g (Hellman) 2 3 4 

Belle Isle, b. m (Lyon) 4 4 2 

Lor3 Roberts, b. s (Milan) 5 6 

Minter, b. m (De Ryder) d 

Brilliant Girl, b. m (Curry) d 

Time— 2:14, 2:10%, 2:12. 

Wednesday — Third Day. 

Four fine races were trotted and paced at Buffalo on 
the third day of the meeting, 2:10 being beaten in 
every event. Ed Geers had u close call in the 2:01 
pace. When in the third heat at the head of the 
stretch King Direct, pacing strongly, struck his hoof 
through the wheel of Locanda's sulky. There was a 
tangle of horses, sulkies and drivers, almost imme- 
diately swallowed up in a cloud of dust. When the 
scene cleared up Geers was seen prostrate on the 
ground; Driver Snow was on his feet making his way 
to the judges' stand; Locanda had been safely caught, 
and King Direct had started on a wild runaway, drag- 
ging along a somewhat shattered sulky. 

Soon stable hands and Others, including a physi- 
cian, were at Geers' side. It was found he had suf- 
fered a bad cut of. his leg and was stunned, but he 
speedily recovered his breath, and his first words 
were: "Now don't make a hurrah of this thing and 
scare everybody to death for nothing." 

To show he was all right, Geers then came out, 
and back of Turley in the 2:11 trot which followed, 
won the deciding heat, being given a tremendous ova- 
tion. Locanda had two heats in the 2:04 pace when 
the accident occurred, and as the judges found both 
drivers blameless, placed the horses in the final heat 
so the Allerton stallion got the race. Locanda was fa- 
vorite at $50 to $10 on the field before the first heat, 
and ruled favorite throughout. 

Snyder McGregor, the favorite in the 2:08 trot, 
reduced his record to 2.06% in the first heat, but was 
beaten the second heat by Norman B. in 2:06%. Di- 
rect View trotted a good race, and Tuna, though last, 
saved here distance, showing that she is improving. 

John Caldwell was a starter in the 2:11 trot and won 
the first heat in 2:09, but made a break in the second 
heat and was distanced. Nora McKinney finished in 
sixth position the first heat and got the flag in the 
next. 

The 2:17 pace went to Bolivar, as he stood best in 
the summary, although winning but one heat. Cap- 
tain Derby, son of Chas. Derby, was second. The heat 
won by Bolivar was in 2:08%. Albuta was in the 
ruck at the finish of each heat. The summaries: 

Trotting. 2:08 class, purse $1000. 
Snvder McGregor, b. g., by Gilman's McGregor 

(Hogan) 12 1 

Norman B.. blk g., by Fhallas (McCarthy) 2 12 

Direct View, br. h (De Ryder) 3 3 3 

Topsy, b. m (Lattimer) 4 4 5 

Tuna, b. m (Curry) 5 5 4 

Time— 2:06% 2:06% 2:09% . 

Pacing, 2:04 class, purse $1500. 

Locanda, br. s., by Allerton (Snow) 116 

Anidrosis. Ch. g., by St. Croix (Allen) 7 5 1 

Nervolo, b. h (A. P. McDonald) 2 2 3 

Belle M.. b. m (Laird) 3 3 2 

Hazel Patchen. blk h (Flack— Curry) 4 7 4 

King Direct, blk s (Geers) 6 4 7 

Nathan Strauss, b. g (A. Thomas) li 6 5 

Time— 2:05 2:05 2:06% V 

Trotting, 2:11 class, purse $1000. 

Turley, br. g., by French Plate (Geers) 3 i i 

Robert Mc, b. g (Jolly) 2 2 2 

John Caldwell, b. g (Thompson) Id 

Lady Gail Hamilton, blk. m (Howell) 4 3 3 

Major Greer, s. g (McCarthy) 5 4 4 

Nora McKinney. b. m (Andrews) 6 d 

Millard Saunders, b. g (Snow) d 

Time— 2:09 2:10% 2:13% 

Pacing, 2.17 class, purse $2000. 

Bolivar, b. g., by Wayland W (De Ryder) 2 1 4 

Hal T., br. s (Snow) 18 6 

Captain Derby, b. h ( HIdridge) 4 2 7 

F. J. Park. b. s (Lyon) 7 5 2 

Black Patchen, blk. h (Hogan) 6 4 3 

Bonnie Wilkes, ch. m (Howard) 3 6 5 

Albuta, b. c (Walker) 8 7 8 

Keel Nightingale, br. m (Stokes) d 

Time— 2:06% 2:08% 2:09% 
Thursday, Fourth Day. 

Tiverton beat Sweet Marie in the first two heats of 
the free-for-all trot to-day, but the mare beat him 
in the third heat and convinced those who saw the 
race that in a three in five plan she could take his 
measure almost any day. George G. trotted a very 
high class race in this event, being timed in better 
than 2:07 in the first two heats. Sweet Marie was 
favorite before the race and the betting was quite 
heavy. 

Starter Newton raised a howl when he sent the 
bunch away in the first heat with the favorite, Sweet 
Marie, two lengths behind. Despite this handicap, 
the mare trotted a good mile. George G. was only 
two lengths behind Tiverton under the wire, and 
Sweet Marie, in third place, was apparently doing 
her best. In the second heat the conditions were 
about the same, George G. giving Tiverton a good 
race throughout the stretch. 

The third heat was decidedly the best contest of 
the meeting. Sweet Marie and Tiverton went off 
in front when they were given the word. Trotting 
side by side until three-quarters was reached, the 
animals showed wonderful speed. It looked as 
though Tiverton would make it three straight heats. 
In the struggle through the stretch Sweet Marie dis- 
played remarkable gameness, and foot by foot pulled 
away from Tiverton, winning the heat by a length. 
After the race A. P. McDonald, who drove Sweet 
Marie, said that the mare was not in the best of con- 
dition, otherwise Tiverton would have been beaten. 
The summaries: 

Pacing. 2:14 class, purse $1000. 
Kruger, ch. g. by Mercury (Alonzo McDonald) 111 

Queen of Spades, blk. m (Snow) 2 2 2 

High Seven, ch. g (Stewart) 4 3 3 

Wester, blk. g (Valentine) 3 4 4 

Bedford Boy, r. g (Brawley) 5 5 6 

Roland Reed, blk. g (Day) d 

Time— 2:08, 2:08, 2:09%. 



Trotting, free-for-all class, purse $2000. 

Tiverton, b. s. by Galilee Rex (Howell) 1 

.sweet Marie, b. m (A. P. McDonald) 3 

George G„ b. g (Geers) 2 

Mckinley, b. g (Benyon) 4 

Time — 2:05%. 2:06, 2:06%» 
Pacing, 2:18 class, purse $1000. 

Maud Keswfek. b. m. by Keswick. .... (James) " 1 

Inter Ocean, br. g ( A. Thomas) 2 

'"'I? '\ m (Snow) 5 

Bertha VS.. br. m (Lambert) 4 

Kegina S . s. m nr. Stoker) 3 

lommie Hums. b. g (McCarthy) 6 

Time— 2.11%, 2:10%, 2:08%. 
Trotting, 2:15 class, purse $1000. 

Thorne Hoy. white g. by Hesperus. (Patterson) 1 

Joe N.. blk g (Dave McDonald) 2 

Jim Fentoii, b. g (McDermott I 4 

Harry J., blk. g (W. Laird) 3 

Belladi, b. m (Rutherford) 5 

Directum Lass. b. m (A. P. McDonald) 6 

Time — 2:10%. 2:12%, 2:13. > 

o 

ZIBBELL BENEFIT AT SANTA ROSA. 



Quite a crowd was present at the Santa Rosa track 
on Wednesday of this week, when a benefit was ten- 
dered Willard Zibbell, the young horseman who was 
so badly injured by being run over by three freight 
cars at Fresno. 

A good program had been arranged by the Sonoma 
County Driving Club, consisting of seven events, and 
everything passed off pleasantly. The beneficiary 
was present with his wife and other relatives and saw 
his father drive his great horse Adam G. to easy 
victory in the fourth race. 

Messrs. Springer, Sutherland and Dunbar acted as 
judges, and the timers were Messrs. Lumsden, Smith 
and Delaney. The starting was done by Schuyler 
Walton, and Walter Trefry acted as track marshal. 
The summary of the races follows: 

First race, 2.12 pace. 

Welladay, by Steinway (Cuicello) 1 1 

Miss Winn, by Demonio (Reams) 2 2 

Time— 2:17% 2:17% 

Second race, mixed. 

Friskurina, by Bayswater Wilkes (Hov) 1 1 

l.ijero (Wright) 2 2 

McKinney colt (McDonald) 3 3 

Time — 2:20 2:21% 

Third race, mixed. 
Rita II.. by McKinney. driven by Durfee. and Robizola, 
by Robin, driven by Abels, made a dead heat in 2:12%. 

Fourth race, trotting. 

Adam G.. by McKinney (j. Zcbbell) 1 

Oro Belmont, by Oro Wilkes ...(Reams) 2 

Pat Rose, by Falrose ... (Wright) 3 

Jupiter B., by Gen. Beverley ' (Durfee) 4 

Time— 2:17% 
Fifth race, trotting. 

F. S. Turner, by Vallota (Abels) 1 " 1 

Clipper W., by Linwood W (Cuicello) 2 12 

Time — 2:24 2:26% 2:25% 
Sixth race, trotting. 

Dumont S., by Linwood W (Quinn) 1 

Zambia, by McKinney (Ward) I 

Time — 2.23 
Seventh race, trotting. 

Casslan, by Mendocino (Cuicello) 1 

Wild Bell, by Wildnut (Freeman) 2 

Time — 2:29% 
o 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

H. G. HEWITT, Healdsburg— Morosco won the 2.19 
class trot at Santa Rosa in 1904, in straight heats. 
The time was 2:12%, 2:12% and 2:12. 



JAMES CROSSLY, City— The pacing mare Much 
Better 2:07% made her record at Santa Rosa, August 
27th, 1898. She started twice at that meeting, which 
was given by the Breeders' Association, and won both 
races in straight heats. The time of the miles in the 
first race, which was best three in five, was 2:10% in 
every heat. The other race was best two in three. 
The time was 2:07% and 2.09. She was driven in this 
race by Farmer Bunch. Much Better was bred at 
Oakwood Park Stock Farm. She is now owned by 
James W. Rea of San Jose. 



SUBSCRIBER, Portland— The free for all pace at 
the Portland, Oregon, meeting in June and July, 1894, 
was won by the California horse Plunkett. There 
were five heats, Del Norte taking the first two. The 
time was 2:17, 2:14%. 2.17%, 2:31 and 2:17%. The 
bay gelding Cyrus by Captain Webster, was also a 
starter, but was distanced in the second heat. The 
time of the fourth heat was slow on account of the 
repeated breaking of Del Norte, the driver of Plunkett 
not trying to shut him out. 



L.' C. R., Sacramento — The mare Sally Pointer 
2:13%, of which mention was made last week, was, 
wo think, bred by Ed. Allen of Los Angeles, and sold 
at the Potter sale there in 1901, the same time Sweet 
Marie was sold. She w r as catalogued as Sister's Baby 
and was then a two-year-old. It was stated in the 
catalogue that she had paced a quarter in 31 seconds 
that year. 

1 — o 

Gazelle 2:11% by Gossiper, the dam of Zolock 2:05% 
and Zephyr 2:11 trotting is now owned by Mr. J. C. 
McKinney of Tltusville, Pa. Gazelle was bred by Ben 
Davis of San Bernardino, and took her record in 1896 
at Woodland, when she was five years old. Her dam 
Gipsey by Gen. Booth 2.03%, is also the dam of De- 
lilah (3) 2:14%, and is out of Echo Belle, the grandam 
of Conn 2:15%, by Echo. Gen. Booth was by Geo. 
M. Patchen 30. The performances of Zolock and 
Zephyr this year have caused many inquiries to be 
made about Gazelle. Mr. Davies sold her, we believe, 
to Mr. Chas. Winship of Los Angeles, who in turn 
sold her to his cousin, A. H. Miller of Buffalo, who 
disposed of her to Mr. McKinney, her present owner. 



August 12, I905j 



A TRIBUTE TO JUDGE GREENE'S MEMORY. 

OLEMA, August 8th, 1905. 

Dear Breeder and Sportsman — I see by this morn- 
ing's Call that Judge W. E. Greene has been called by 
the grim reaper who spares neither the young nor the 
old, the dullard or the wise and good. To the last- 
named class our dear Judge belonged. For, readers 
of the Breeder and Sportsman, he was "our Judge,'' 
he loved what we love, clean out-door sports, but es- 
pecially did he love the light harness horse. Arm In 
arm with Monroe Salisbury, the iron man, or with 
Dr. Latham of honored memory, have I seen this grand 
old man going to worship St. Equus. Judge Greene 
was a close student of form and breeding. Early in 
the history of this State he imported from Maine to 
Stockton the stallion Winthrop 505. Association with 
Monroe Salisbury begot a love for the Director fam- 
ily in later years, so that the Judge bred and owned 
some fine Director, Direct and Directum colts. Be- 
fore "the dreaded warrior in sombre harness mailed, 
surnamed of man the destroyer the rampart walls 
had scaled," the Judge had seen his namesake heat all 
four-year-olds of his year and retire a champion. 

Last year at Santa Rosa, at the Breeders' meeting. 
Judge Greene, his son Carlton, and I met. Politics, 
horses and law were discussed alternately. The 
Judge insisted upon my dining with him. The meal 
was "a feast of reason and a flow of soul," as we two 
listened to the Judge as lie presented his clear-cut 
views. I then heard much of the late Tom Reed, the 
great, perhaps the greatest Speaker of the House of 
Representatives the United States ever had. Reed 
and Judge Green were schoolmates in the State of 
Maine. Both became school teachers and both became 
great. 

Before Judge Greene the lawyer or lawyers who 
tried to demur, object, delay or stay the hand of 
justice felt the majesty of the law. Six feet two 
inches in height, symmetrical, broad chested, digni- 
fied, just, learned, Judge Greene would turn to him 
who was trying to hoodwink the court or pervert the 
ends of justice, with: "Come to the point, sir — the 
issue at stake. Make a statement involving the is- 
sues; don't pettifog, sir! The court has no time to 
hear extraneous, outside matters discussed!" 

Of course, "our Judge" had enemies. What strong 
man in power has not? But his enemies as a rule 
were those who desired to bolster up a weak case and 
lead blind Justice astray. The earnest lawyer and 
upright citizen respected and loved "our Judge." To 
them his memory will be ever green. 

Judge Ogden recently said. "We" (referring to the 
Superior Court of Alameda county) "are carrying on 
Judge Greene's work, fervently hoping and anxiously 
expecting that our associate will get well." 

Let us hope that the "Supreme Court" — the court 
of last appeal before which our friend has appeared, 
has said: "Well done, good and faithful servant." 

"The crowned head and the lowly cowl, all must 
come to the narrow tomb. It is only the actions of 
the just that smell sweet and bloom in the dust." 

Judge Greene was not only an upright judge, but a 
true American, who devotedly loved his country and 
her institutions. No applicant for citizenship could 
pass muster before him, whether his sponsors were 
Republicans or Democrats, unless knowing enough to 
be of value to our country and a support to her insti- 
tutions in time of peace or war. The Superior Judges 
of Alameda county are all able, upright men, but 
they will sorely miss the dear Judge, the Nestor of 
their bench. When some new comer sits in Judge 
Greene's place, he shall often turn to his associates 
for advice and they will say: "Decide as Greene 
would have done, and in the decision the dead Judge 
will live again " 

PAYNE SHAFTER. 



GETTING READY FOR THE STATE FAIR. 



SACRAMENTO, August 10. — The race traek at the 
State Agricultural Society's new grounds is finished, 
and those who have seen it, declare it to be one 
of the finest in all the West. The soil is a reddish 
yellow clay, such as was used in the coating of the 
old State Fair course several years ago, and makes 
a course full of elasticity and springiness, and when 
it has been worked a little more it will be a remark- 
ably fast track. 

"Farmer" Bunch drove over the new track the other 
day and expressed great satisfaction with it. In 
fact, he became very enthusiastic over it, and pre- 
dicted that at fair time it will be faster than either 
the San Jose or Santa Rosa tracks. 

The work on the cottage stables for the running 
and trotting horses is nearly finished. These are 
handsome buildings, possessing considerable archi- 
tectural beauty, and have been built with the idea 
of permanency above all else. 

The several structures rest on massive concrete 
foundations and are quite a height above the ground. 
The floors are all of two-inch planking. Every stall 
is well lighted and ventilated, and particular attention 
has been paid to drainage in and about the stables. 

Work is progressing on the temporary grandstand, 
and temporary quarters for some of the livestock 
will soon be provided. The directors found it im- 
possible to erect all permanent buildings out of the 
comparatively small amount of money appropriated 
for this purpose, so have been obliged to erect tem- 
porary buildings for some of the horses and cattle. 

The harness contingent will have a try at three 
rich stakes this year, and, strange to say, these 
events are all for three-year-olds. 

The Occident Stake is worth $3880, the Stanford 
$1770, with another payment due, and the Stallion 
Stake, for foals of 1902, $3300. As is generally under- 
stood, this stake Is divided Into two divisions, one for 



trotters and the other for pacers. The trotting di- 
vision will have 60 per cent of all moneys paid in, 
and the pacing division 40 per cent. The nominator 
of the winner of either division will receive $250. 

The society feels greatly encouraged with the out- 
look for a successful State Fair. All the harness 
events have filled well, and the running contingent 
will be represented by many of the horses now racing 
at Portland, as well as those which have had a good 
rest since the close of the winter meeting at Oak- 
land. 

A platform is being constructed a few yards from 
the back stretch, where all horses shipped to the 
new track can be unloaded from the cars. This will 
prove a great convenience to horsemen. 

A suburban trolley extension has been constructed 
to carry lovers of racing to the park, which is situated 
a short distance from the city. A splendid trolley 
service is promised between the city and the park, 
and the local street railway company is planning to 
handle the traffic without discomfort or delay to 
patrons of the races. 

An item of interest is the fact that the directors 
have decided to issue a family season ticket this year 
for $5, which will admit an entire family to • the 
park mornings and afternoons. 

There will be no admission charge to the pavilion, 
the directors and the Native Sons of the Golden 
West, who are to celebrate the entire week, having 
joined hands in keeping "open house." The displays 
at the pavilion will be of varied character and high 
standard, and will embrace competitive county ex- 
hibits, a poultry show surpassing all former attempts 
in this line, agricultural, horticultural, dairy and in- 
dustrial exhibits. 

It has not yet been decided who will be engaged to 
judge the livestock. Professor W. L. Carlyle of Wis- 
consin has a prior engagement which precludes his ac- 
cepting the post he has held so satisfactorily to Cali- 
fornia breeders for several years. 

The directors of the fair are corresponding with 
several recognized authorities, and hope to announce 
at an early date that a selection has been made. 



BREEDERS' MEETING AT SANTA ROSA. 



Everything is in readiness for the big annual meet- 
ing of the Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders' As- 
sociation which will open at Santa Rosa on Wednes- 
day next, August 16th. 

The California and Northwestern Railway Company 
will run a special train each day from Tiburon, con- 
necting with the ferry boat that leaves this city at 
9 a. m. Returning the train will leave Santa Rosa at 
7 p. m. The fare will be but one dollar for the round 
trip. 

On Saturday, the last day of the meeting, a special 
excursion will be run from Ukiah to Santa Rosa and 
return, leaving Ukiah at 9 a. m. and leaving Santa 
Rosa on the return trip at 6.45 p. m. 

The program of races is the best that has been of- 
fered in California for years, and the stakes are the 
largest offered for trotters and pacers on this coast. 
There is an excellent program for each day of the 
meeting. The 2:10 horses are numerous so that fast 
racing can be expected every day. The Santa Rosa 
track record is 2:06, which it is confidently expected 
will be lowered the day Zolock starts in the 2:09 
class pace. 

The program of each day's racing is here given, 
with the list of horses eligible to start in the different 
svents: 

Wednesday — First Day. 

Trotting— 2:27 class, $800 —Adam G., Frank O'Kane, 
Dewdrop, Oro Belmont, Don M., Connors, D. E. 
Knight. Wildbell, La Correcta, Alma, Leroy O , Char- 
lie T., Suomi, Birdcatcher, Silver Bow Jr., Kinmont. 

Pacing, 2:20 class, Pacific Slope Stakes, $1500— Lit- 
tle Jib, Ruby H., Miss Winn, Welladay, Venus Derby, 
Fearnot, Little Joe, Norda, Mildred O., Joe Robin, 
Uncle John, Pearl Sinclair, Doctor J., Flora G., Nellie 
R., Anna Turner, Argyle, Bessie Barnes, Si Perkins, 
Glen. 

Pacing, 2:13 class, $800— Inferno, Cresco Wilkes, 
Doctor W., Tidal Wave, Frlskarlna, Queen Bee, Vision. 
Thursday — Second Day. 

Trotting Division Breeders' Futurity for Two-Year- 
Olds, $1450— Delia Derby. 

Trotting, 2.17 class, $800 — Cuate, Hank, Marvin 
Wilkes, Milbrae, Zambia, Talisman, Prince Ansel, 
What Is It, Oma A , Redskin, Jupiter B., Zombowette. 

Pacing Division Breeders' Futurity for three-year- 
olds, $1300— Roberta, Delilah, Mamonio, Mona Wilkes, 
Just It, Deviletta. 

Friday — Third Day. 

Pacing Division Breeders' Futurity for Two-Year- 
Olds, $950— McFayden, Magladl. 

Pacing, 2:09 class, $1000— Queen Bee, Zolock, El 
Diablo, Tom Carneal, Alone, Rajah, Kelly Briggs, 
Hilly Red or Miss Idaho, Reta H., Daedalion. 

Trotting, 2:13 class, $.800— Lady Madison, Redskin, 
Dr. Hammond, Robizola, Liege, II. D. B., Walter 
Wilkes, Princess. 

Saturday — Fourth Day. 

Trotting Division Breeders' Futurity 
Year-Olds, $2300— North Star, Ambush 
Ballemont, Still Better, Elma S., Kenneth C. 

Trotting, 2.24 class, California Stake, $2000— Sonoma 
Girl, Birdcatcher, Leroy O., Billy Dooley, D. E. Knight, 
Connors, Don M., Oro Belmont, Blanche T., Auget 
Baron, Little Babe, Homeway, The Bouquet, Charlie 
T., Modoc, Helen Dare. 

Pacing, 2:17 class, $800— Glen, SI Perkins or Queen 
Director, Pearl Sinclair, Cresco Wilkes, John R. Con- 
way, Selda, Antonlous, Little Jib, Miss Winn, Wella- I _ 
day, Mildred O., Joe Robin, Sweetheart, Penrose, 4 ' 
Economizer, Argyle, Flora G., Prince Charles. 

o 



for Three- 
Athasham, 



DEXTER PRINCE 
HIGH CLASS BOARDING STABLE 
Victou Vkhilbac, Prep. James M. MfGRA-rn. Mgr. 

Worth Oher. Trainer. 
1509 Grove Street, corter Baker. Phone: Fell 5161. 

Located one block from Panhandle of tno UoldenGale Park 
lake Hayes, McAllister or Devlsadero street cars. 

Nothing succeeds like success is true of every enter- 
prise, and Vic. Verilhac of the well known Dexter 

Prince stable, 1509 Grove street, San Francisco, has 
no reason to doubt the truth of this saying. Since 
his purchase of this stable the reputation he has 
earned for the manner in which he cares for all horses 
and vehicles in his charge has increased so that in 
order to meet requests of many horse owners he has 
been compelled to build an addition to his stable. He 
recently erected a large building and has put box 
stalls and single stalls therein besides a splendid dust- 
proof loft for vehicles. Electric lights have been 
installed and the greatest care has been taken In pro- 
viding light and air for the horses: The sanitation 
in this large stable is perfect. 

There are at present thirty-four box stalls and 
forty-five single stalls, nearly all filled by the best 
road horses in San Francisco. 

There are twelve matinee racers being prepared 
by two special trainers from Pleasanton among them 
are Gertie A., second to Tom Carneal in 2:08% in 
Santa Rosa in 1904. Also winner of many a hard 
fought race, and entered in the free-for-all on the 
4th of September at Ingleside. Also King Cadenza 
2:15%. Kitty D., winner of the two-mile free-for-all 
last Butchers' Day; Al Sandy, winner of the 2:20 
class pace the same day; Harry Hurst, 2:14; Ruby 
L. and Laurelwood, the two best trotters that go 
through the Golden Gate Park. Either can step a 
mile in 2.15, with ease. Satinwood can show a mile 
any day in 2:10 pacing. Billy Humes and Cashmont 
the property of Max Levy, of Seattle, are both good 
ones, and when ready will be heard from. Silver 
Moon, the best bred stallion in California, can trot 
over the speed track in 2:20. Wallie, the handsom- 
est road horse in San Francisco, with a record of 
2:18 as a three-year-old, and a four-year-old chest- 
nut. Derby, a full brother to Bain, and half-brother 
to King Cadenza and King V.; this is a promising 
young gelding with a world of speed. There are many 
others that will be heard about after the next matinee 
races on the 4th of September. 

Mr. Verilhac has employed a very careful man to 
handle young colts. He has already three that were 
purchased at the last Chase sale, going along the 
park roads like old horses. He employs the best 
help and uses only the choicest of hay and grain. 
Being a hard worker he gives his personal attention 
to this thriving business. 



EXCURSIONS TO BREEDERS' MEETING. 



Jackson 'a Napa Soda does not tangle the feet 



R. X. Ryan, General Passenger Agent of the Cali- 
fornia Northwestern Railway, has addressed the fol- 
lowing letter to the editor of this journal: 

"Dear Sir: For information, would advise that we 
will run on August 16th, 17th, 18th and 19th, a special 
train to Santa Rosa, leaving San Francisco at 9:00 
a. m.. and on the return leave Santa Rosa at 7:00 
p. in. Fare for the round trip. $1.00. This train will 
stop at Tiburon, San Rafael, Ignacio, Petaluma and 
Penn Grove. The fare from Tiburon, San Rafael and 
Ignacio will be $1.00, and from Petaluma and Penn 
Grove 50 cents for the round trip. 

"On Saturday. August 19th, we will run a special 
excursion from Ukiah, leaving Ukiah at 9:00 a. m., 
and on the return leave Santa Rosa at 6:45 p. m. 
Fare for the round trip will be $1 01). and train will 
stop at all intermediate points. From intermediate 
points rates graduate under $1.00. 

DEATH OF ALEX. J. McKERRON. 

We are pained to announce the death In this city 
on the 8th inst. of Alex. J. McKerron, beloved and 
only son of Mr. John A. McKerron, the well known 
manufacturer of fine harness. Alex McKerron was 
a most promising young man, aged 22 years, and since 
completing his education had been a trusted and 
gieatly esteemed employee of the large lumber firm 
Of Pope & Talbot of this city. About two weeks ago 
he was afflicted with appendicitis, for which an oper- 
ation was necessary, but he did riot survive the 
shock. The funeral took place on Thursday last, In- 
terment being at Holy Cross Cemetery. Mr. McKer- 
ron will have the sympathies of every horseman In 
California as well as hundreds of other warm friends 
in his bereavement. 

o 

Westchester Racing Association announces in our 
business columns this week, many slakes to close 
August 15th for It Autumn meeting. Belmont Park, 
where these nic es will he run, is the finest race course 
In America. The stakes announced are for two-year* 
olds, three-year-olds, two-year-olds and upwards and 
three-year-olds and upwards, besides weight for age 
races and several steeplechase events. In all the 
stakes the amount of added money is large and the 
subscriptions very small. A full list of these stakes 
with conditions will be found in the advertisement. 
We would call the attention of all owners and breed- 
ers of thoroughbreds to the statement of the West- 
chester Racing Association that the fixed events for 
now yearlings, to run when two-year-olds in 1906, 
when three-year-olds in 1907, and for foals of 1905 
to run In 1908 will be duly announced to close Sep- 
tember 16th, 1906, viz., In 1906, the Juvenile, the 
Fashion, the Eclipse; 1907, the Withers, the Ladies, 
he forty-first Belmont for now yearlings; 1908, the 
forty-second Belmont for foals of 1905. The tenth 
National Stallion race of 1904 will close for stallions 
at the same time. 



8 



LAuocst 12, 19C6 



ROD, GUN AND KENNEL. 

Conducted by J. X. De WITT. 



Coming Events. 



April l-Sept. 10. Oct. I6-Feb. I— Open season (or taking stoel- 
h >ad in tidewater. 
April l-Sept. 15— Closed season for lobsters and crawfish. 
April l-Nov. 1— Tnut Heason open. 
June ' i. u. I— Open season for black bass 

Aug 26— Saturday Fly-Casting Contest No. 10. Stow lake, 2:30 
p. m 

*ug. 27— Sunday Fly Casting Contest No. 10 Stow lake, 10 a. m 
Sept. I0-Oct. 16 -Close reason in tidewater for steelbead. 
Sept. I0-Oct. 16— Close season for catching salmon. 
Oct. 16-Nov. 15— Close season for taking salmon above tide, 
water. 

Nov. l-Sept. I — Open season for crabs. 

Nov. I5-Sept. 10 — Season open for taking salmon above tide 
I ater 

Sun. 

Feb. 15-Sept. 1— Closed season for mountain quail, grouse and 
tage ben. 

Feb. 15-Ocl. 15— Closed season for qur\ll. ducks, etc. 
April l-Oct. 15— Closed season for English snipe. 
July l-Feb. 15— Dove season open. 
Aug 1-Oet. 15— Deer season open. 

Aug Sebastopol Gun Club. Blue rocks. Every Sunday. 

Aug. Napa Quo Club Blue rocks Every Sunday. 

Aug, 6, 20— Petaluma Gun Club. Blue rocks. Kenllworth Park, 
Aug. 6, 20— Mount View Gun Club Blue rocks. Mount View. 
Cai. 

Aug 13— California Wing Club Live pigeons Ingleside. 
Aug 13-Open toall blue rock shoot Hunters' Inn, San Leandro. 
Aug. 13. 27— Santa Rosa Gun Club Blue rocks. 
Aug. 13, 27-Vallejo Gun Club. Blue rocks. Flosden Statkn. 
Aug. 20— Union Gun Club. Blue rocks. Ingleside. 
, Aug. 27— Millwood Gun Club. Blue rocks. Mill Valley 
Junction. 

Aug. 27— Lincoln Gun Club. Live birds. Reclamation Station 
Aug. 29 30— Interstate Association tournamont. Blue rocks 
Denver. Col. 

Sept 3— Golden Gate Gun Club. Blue rocks. Ingleside. 
Sept 3— Blue R >ck Gun Club High-street grounds, Alameda. 
Sept. 9, 10— Empire Gun Club. Merchandise shoot. Blue rocks 
Alameda Junction. 
Sept. 15. 16, 17— Interstate shoot. Blue rocks Ingleside. Elmer 

E. Shatter. Manager. Pacific Coast Handicap under auspices of 
S. F. Trapshooiiug Ass n., A. M. Shields, Secretary 

Sept. 30-Oct. 1— Two-day blue rock tournament. Utggs Gun 
Club Biggs, Butte county. H. Haselbusch, manager 

Bench Shows. 

Aug. 15, 18— Orange County Agricultural Society. Middletown 
N. Y. D. A. Morrison, Secretary. 

Aug 18. 19 — Lynn Kennel Cub Point of Pines, Revere Mass. 
W. H Ximines. Secretary. 

Aug. 23. 25— Rockland County Industrial Association. Bench 
show in New York City, N Y. A A. Vanderbllt, Secretary. 

Sept 4— Long Island Kennel Club. Brighton Beach, L I. Jos 
M. Dale, Secretary. 

Sept. 4— Rhode Island Kennel Club Crescent Park, East Provl 
denoe, R. I H. M. French, Secretary. 

Sept. 4, 5— Miller's River Kennel Club. Athol Mass. Wm. W 
Sutton, secretary. 

Sept. 9— San Mateo Kennel Club. 2r.d annual open air show 
Burllngamo. Irving C. <\ckerman. Secretary. 

Sept 9— Cedarhurst Kennel Club. Lawrence, L. I. John G 
Bates, Secretary. 

Sept 1 1. 13 -Newport Dog Show. Newport, R.I. Francis M 
Ware, Secretary 

Sept. Sania Cruz Kennel Club. Inaugural show. Santa 

Cruz, Cal. Warren H Porter, Secretary. 

Sept. 16— Englewood Kennel Club. Englewood. N J. M. W 
Robinson, Secretary. 

Sept. 18, 21— Genesee County Agricultural Society Kennel Club. 
Batavla, N. Y. A. E. Brown, Secretary. 

Sept. 23— Madison Athletic Association. Madison, N. J. E. L. 
Jones, Secretary. 

Sept. 25, 26-Mlami Valley Kennel Club. Plqua, Ohio. Edwin 
A. Hlatt, Secretary. 

Sept. 27, 28— Valley Fair Kennel Club. Brattleboro, Vt. 
Howard C. Rice, Secretary. 

Sept. 30-Bryn Mawr Kennel Club. Haverford.Pa Henry D. 
Riley, Secretary. 

Oct 3,6— Texas Kennel Club. Dallas, Tex. W. H. Ordway, 
Secretary. 

Oct. 3, 6— Danbury Agricultural Society, Danbury, Conn. G. 
M. Rundle, Secretary. Jas. Mortimer, Superintendent. 

Oot II. 14— Spokane Kennel Club Spokane, Wash. A. B. 
Jackson, Secretary. 

Oct 17. 20— Frederick Agricultural Society. Frederick, Md 
J. Roger McSherry, Secretary 

Oct. 19, 21 — Stockton Kennel Club F. A. Gelsea, Secretary, 
Stockton, Cal. 

Nov. 15, 18— Boston Terrier Club Specialty Club. Boston. F 
H. Osgood, Secretary. 

Nov 28-D)o. 1 -Philadelphia Dog Show Association. Phila- 
delphia. J. Sergeant Price Jr., Secretary. 

1900. 

Feb. 12. 15— Westminster Kennel Club. New York. Robt. V. 
McKim, Secretary. 

Feb. 20, 23— New Enfe ind Kennel Club Boston. Wm. B. 
Emery, Secretary. 

Feb 28-March 3— Washington Kennel Club. Washington, Pa- 

F. C. Tnomas, Secretary. 

March 7, 10— Duquesne Kennel Club. Pittsburg, Pa. F. S. 
Steadman. Secretary. 

Field Trials. 

Aug. 15— Iowa Field Trial Club. Geo. C. Cooper, Secretary, P. 
O. Box 55, Des Moines, la. 

Aug. 23— North Dakota Field Trial Club. Inaugural trials 
Grand Forks, N. D A. E. Palmer, Secretary, Grand Forks, N. D. 

Sept 4— Nebraska Field Trial Association. 4th annual trials. 
O'Neill, Neb. H. H. McCarthy, Secretary, O'Neill, Neb. 

Sept. «— Manitoba Field Trial Club, 19th annual trials. La 
Salle. Man. Eric Hamber, Secretary, Winnepeg Man. 

Sept. 11 —Northwestern Field Trial Association. Inaugural 
trials. O'Neill, Neb. C W. Buttles, Secretary , Kansas City. Mo. 

Sept. 21— British Columbia Field Trial Club, 3d annual trials. 
Ladner, B C. H. S Rolston, Secretary , Vancouver B.C. 

Oct. 12— Pacific Northwest Field Trial Club. La Conner Flats, 
Wash. Chas. L. Lundy, Secretary, Seattle, Wash 

Oct. 23— Ohio Field Trial Association. Washington Court House. 
O C T. Phillips, secretary. Columbus, O. 

Oct. 30— American Field Futurity Stake. For Pointers and 
Setters whelped on or after January I, 1904. whose dams have 
been duly qualified. Robinson, 111 , entries closed July I. Address 
Am. Field Publishing Co., Chicago. 



Oct. 31— Connecticut Field Trial Club. Hampton, Conn, F M. 
Chapin, Secretary, Pine Meadow, Conn. 

Nov. 6— Independent Field Trial Association. Huntsville Hi. 
S. H Socwull, Secretary, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Nov. 8— Dayton Pointer Club. Dayton, O. John Roihm, Secre- 
retary. Dayton, O. 

Nov 13— Illinois Field Trial Association. Robinson, 111. Wm. 
R Green, Secretary, Marshall, III. 

Nov Indiana Field Trial Club, (Week following Illinois 

Champion Stake). C. F. Young. Secretary , Clay City, lud. 

Nov. 21— International Field Trial Club. Ruthven. Ont. W. B. 
Wells, Honorary Secretary, Chatham, Ont. 

Nov. 28-Virglnla Field Trial Association. Martinsville, Va. 
Chas B Cooke, Secretary, R chmond, Va. 

Dec. 2— Continental Field Trial Club, Il'h annual trials, . 

John White, Secretary, Hempstead, Long Island. 

Dee Pointer Club of America (following the Continental 

trials). Karber, N. C. O. F. Lewis, Secretary, 126 Maiden Lane, 
New York. 

Dec' 12— Eastern Field Trial Club Waynesboro, Ga. S. C. 
Bradley, Secretary. Fairfield. Conn. 

looo. 

Jan. 8 -Georgia Field Trial Association. Waynesboro, Ga. 
P. M. Esstg. Secretary, Atlanta, Ga. 

Jan Pacific Coast Field Trials Club, 23d annual trials 

Bakers-field, Cal Albert Betz, Secretary, 201 Parrott Bldg.. San 

Francisco. 



FISH COMMISSIONER BERMINGHAM 
STRIPED BASS. 



ON 



Editor Breeder and Sportsman — Dear Sir: In your 
issue of August 5th, I notice an article on striped 
bass and from the tenor of same the average person 
would judge that the striped bass are being wiped out 
in a similar manner to the sturgeon. I note that Mr. 
Al. M. Cumming states that fishing is now very poor 
at San Antone Slough and am at a loss to under- 
stand how he can make this statement in view of 
the picture published in one of the weekly sporting 
periodicals which portrayed the catch of Mr. Kittle's 
one day's fishing on San Antone Slough. In looking 
at the picture, to the best recollection of the writer, 
there were at least 25 bass, and some of them must 
have been at least two feet long. It is hardly fair to 
presume that Mr. Kittle, who is a well known sports- 
man, would publish a picture of this kind if he did 
not catch the fish himself. From this it would seem 
that either Mr. Kittle is a more experienced fisherman 
than Mr. Cumming and the others who were not so 
fortunate, or else he selected a better time for fishing 
than they did. 

The fact of the matter is that the striped bass are 
increasing very rapidly and from the reports received 
by the Fish Commission who keep a close watch on 
the amount of fish shipped to the San Francisco mar- 
ket as well as from their regular deputies at different 
portions of the bay frequented by the striped bass, it 
would appear that there is no danger of exterminat- 
ing this popular fish. A great many of the sporting 
fraternity are prone to criticise the Fish Commission 
without justice in a good many instances and at other 
times because of the fact that they do not personally 
care for certain members of the Commission or its 
deputies. The writer has frequently seen anglers 
get on the train at San Pablo station, after a day's 
fishing near Point Richmond, with large strings of 
small striped bass. On one Sunday night, not long 
ago, the writer personally saw three anglers who had 
over 150 bass between them. Some of these bass 
would not weigh one-half a pound. The writer knows 
that these men were what is popularly termed "true 
sports," and yet they took under- weight bass in direct 
violation of the laws which they are so anxious to 
have the Fish Comission uphold. 

The law in reference to striped bass was framed to 
prevent the bass from being depleted and if the anglers 
and market fishermen would both obey the law, there 
would be no chance of wiping out the bass. It has 
not been the intention of the Fish Commission to 
bother the rod fishermen in reference to the weight 
of striped bass, but the matter has become so serious 
and so much criticism has been made against the 
overlooking of this offense by the Commission that it 
is the intention from now on to arrest the rod fisher- 
man who has under-weight striped bass in his pos- 
session in the same manner that it arrests the market 
fisherman. We have three deputies in San Francisco 
and almost all of their time is taken up on the striped 
bass violations. We have seized quantities of fish dur- 
ing the past month or six weeks and have obtained 
several convictions, and just as soon as our patrol 
boat, which has been undergoing repairs, is once more 
in commission, the Commission intends to look into 
the complaints received from the San Antone slough 
and at other portions of the bay. The anglers should 
assist the Commission in the detection of violators 
of the striped bass law and the way to do this properly 
is to supply the Commission with such data as would 
enable it and its deputies, in the event of arrests, in 
getting a conviction. The trouble has been, heretofore, 
that complaints, both verbal and written, received by 
the Fish Commission, have in a great many instances 
been utterly without foundation and of such a nature 
as would make it impossible to obtain convictions 
after arrests. A great many people lose sight of the 
fact that the Commission is liable In a like manner 
to any citizen for false arrest and unless there Is a 
strong probability to obtain conviction, our deputies 
are instructed not to make arrests. It is the duty of 
every citizen, and more especially of every angler, 
to apprehend violators of the fish and game laws, 
and if such a' course was followed out in relation to 
such matters. Instead of criticisms and unfounded 



complaints being sent to the Commission, it would 
materially assist the Commission in stamping out 
these violations. A great many anglers also lose sight 
of the fact that the Fish and Game Commission was 
not created for any one special set of men. The 
money obtained from the Legislature for the Fish 
and Game Commission work is out of public funds and 
we must treat everyone connected with the fish and 
game matters, whether he be an angler, a hunter or a 
market fisherman or M&W) with absolute equality, 
arid in addition to thhftwe wrust provide a food suppl